African and African Disapora Studies Department
African and African Disapora Studies Department

Ben Carrington


Associate ProfessorPh.D., 2004, Sociology, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK

Associate Professor of Sociology
Ben Carrington

Contact

Interests


Post/colonial Theory; Sociology of Race; Cultural Sociology; Sociology of Sport, Media and Popular Culture; Cultural Studies; Masculinity and Gender Studies

Biography


Ben Carrington is a sociologist who has taught at the University of Texas at Austin since 2004. Prior to that he taught at the University of Brighton in England. Professor Carrington studies a broad range of topics and areas generally concerned with mapping the circulation and reproduction of power within contemporary societies. More specifically, he is interested in how ideologies of race shape - and are themselves shaped by - cultural forms, practices and identities and how popular culture is often a key site of both cultural resistance and domination. His work examines the mass media, music and sport as way to understand key sociological dimensions of everyday life such as personal and communal identity and nationalistic identification and dis-identification. Professor Carrington also teaches various undergraduate and graduate classes on the sociology of race, culture, sport and identity. He supervises doctoral students doing interesting work on a range of politically-relevant topics whatever that topic may be. Professor Carrington currently serves on the editorial boards of Sociological Theory, Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, the Journal of Sport and Social Issues, the Sociology of Sport Journal, and the International Review for the Sociology of Sport.

Outside of his courtesy apppoinmnet with AADS and his home department of Sociology, Ben Carrington is actively engaged with a range of institutions and intellectual spaces, including the Center for European Studies and the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies.

Professor Carrington is a Carnegie Research Fellow at Leeds Metropolitan University, England and is a Research Associate of the Centre for Urban and Community Research, based at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

Courses


SOC 322S • The Sociology Of Sport

45400 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.102

Course Description:

Over the past four decades, as the social significance of sport has increased, the sociology of sport has emerged to become a significant sub-discipline of sociology.  Scholars within the sociology of sport have drawn on a wide range of theoretical perspectives to understand the enduring appeal of sporting practices, as well as the various processes of conflict, control and power in and around the institutions of sport.  The course examines the main perspectives in the sociology of sport in order to better understand the complex and contradictory relationship between sport and society.  Further, the course examines the theoretical points of conflict between the different sociological perspectives, which do not merely provide different points of view, but also present the student of sport sociology with competing analytical frameworks on how society itself is structured and works.  The course examines various topics and issues such as gender and representation, violence and deviancy, sexuality and homophobia, commercialization and college sport, race and inequality, and sport and the media. 

Grading Policy:

There are three aspects to how your final grade is reached:

30%                Midterm Exam on Sociological Theories of Sport

30%                Six to eight page book review of a book

40%                Final Exam on Social Issues in Sport

Texts:

Andrews, David L. and Carrington, Ben  (2013) A Companion to Sport, Blackwell.

EUS 346 • Sport & English Society-Gbr

35580 • Spring 2016

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Three page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten to twelve page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

Required reading: Course pack

 

KIN 350 • Soc Aspect Sport/Phys Act-Gbr

11775 • Spring 2016

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Three page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten to twelve page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

Required reading: Course pack

 

SOC 323M • Sport And English Society-Gbr

44580 • Spring 2016

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Three page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten to twelve page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

Required reading: Course pack

 

SOC 395L • Crit Thry Of Race & Racism

44800 • Fall 2015
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM CLA 0.124

Description

This course introduces students to critical, global perspectives on race, ethnicity and racism. Through a series of close readings of key texts the course examines the historical relationship between the emergence of ideas about race and Western modernity. The course is divided into two parts.

Part I examines the importance of slavery and European colonialism in producing modern understandings of race and racial difference. We look at how the social sciences themselves have been implicated in the production of racialized ways of seeing and knowing both the (Western) Self and the (abject) Other: the "West" and _the Rest_. Part I concludes by examining the interrelationships between race, gender, sexuality and nation in the colonial setting.

Part II examines contemporary racial formation in the period after the anti-colonial struggles of the mid-20th century. Key here are the ways in which social theorists have sought to understand both the continuities and discontinuities of colonial regimes in structuring societies in the West, and elsewhere.

Part II thus focuses on questions of State formation, anti-racist political struggle, and the politics of identity in relation to questions of ethnicity. A key aspect of this course is its focus on the global dimensions and manifestations of racism and ethnicity. Although historical and contemporary debates concerning the articulation of race and the ethnicity within the U.S. remain central to many of the readings and class discussions, the course aims to provide a broader, contextual understanding of the changing nature of race and ethnicity across both time and geography. While W.E.B. Du Bois famously observed that the key issue of the 20th century would be the problem of the color line, the course ends by discussing the extent to which race, ethnicity and racism still matter, both sociologically and politically, in the 21st century. The course will be relevant to those students with an interest in critical theories of race and ethnicity and contemporary social theory.

EUS 346 • Sport & English Society-Gbr

35670 • Spring 2015

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374D • Race, Sport, And Identity

30586 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.118
(also listed as SOC 322R)

Description:

This course explores the sociological significance of sport in relation to the construction of racialized identities.  Focusing primarily, although not exclusively, on the black experience in sport, the course examines the changing social meanings given to sport from the start of the 20th century through to today.  The African-American experience is used as a paradigmatic case study through which to locate the ways in which the expression of identity in sport has been used as a form of cultural resistance to racism.  The sociological and historical importance of sport within African-American life is located within the broader context of the African diaspora  in order to understand the wider political significance of sport in the context of global movements of people, images and ideologies. 

Assessment criteria

There are two aspects to how your final grade is reached:

1.            40%        Book Review (6 pages)

2.            60%        End of term essay (12 pages after rewrite)

 

Required reading:

Course pack

 

SOC 322S • The Sociology Of Sport

46210 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 2.312

Course Description:

Over the past four decades, as the social significance of sport has increased, the sociology of sport has emerged to become a significant sub-discipline of sociology.  Scholars within the sociology of sport have drawn on a wide range of theoretical perspectives to understand the enduring appeal of sporting practices, as well as the various processes of conflict, control and power in and around the institutions of sport.  The course examines the main perspectives in the sociology of sport in order to better understand the complex and contradictory relationship between sport and society.  Further, the course examines the theoretical points of conflict between the different sociological perspectives, which do not merely provide different points of view, but also present the student of sport sociology with competing analytical frameworks on how society itself is structured and works.  The course examines various topics and issues such as gender and representation, violence and deviancy, sexuality and homophobia, commercialization and college sport, race and inequality, and sport and the media. 

Grading Policy:

There are three aspects to how your final grade is reached:

30%                Midterm Exam on Sociological Theories of Sport

30%                Six to eight page book review of a book

40%                Final Exam on Social Issues in Sport

Texts:

Andrews, David L. and Carrington, Ben  (2013) A Companion to Sport, Blackwell.

EUS 346 • Sport And English Society-Eng

36935 • Spring 2014
(also listed as SOC 321K)

SOC 321K • Sport and English Society

Spring 2014

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Three page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten to twelve page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

Required reading: Course pack

 

KIN 350 • Soc Aspect Sport/Phys Act-Eng

12105 • Spring 2014

SOC 321K • Sport and English Society

Spring 2014

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Three page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten to twelve page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

Required reading: Course pack

 

SOC 395L • Crit Thry Of Race & Racism

46660 • Spring 2014
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM CLA 3.214F

Description

This course introduces students to critical, global perspectives on race, ethnicity and racism. Through a series of close readings of key texts the course examines the historical relationship between the emergence of ideas about race and Western modernity. The course is divided into two parts.

Part I examines the importance of slavery and European colonialism in producing modern understandings of race and racial difference. We look at how the social sciences themselves have been implicated in the production of racialized ways of seeing and knowing both the (Western) Self and the (abject) Other: the "West" and _the Rest_. Part I concludes by examining the interrelationships between race, gender, sexuality and nation in the colonial setting.

Part II examines contemporary racial formation in the period after the anti-colonial struggles of the mid-20th century. Key here are the ways in which social theorists have sought to understand both the continuities and discontinuities of colonial regimes in structuring societies in the West, and elsewhere.

Part II thus focuses on questions of State formation, anti-racist political struggle, and the politics of identity in relation to questions of ethnicity. A key aspect of this course is its focus on the global dimensions and manifestations of racism and ethnicity. Although historical and contemporary debates concerning the articulation of race and the ethnicity within the U.S. remain central to many of the readings and class discussions, the course aims to provide a broader, contextual understanding of the changing nature of race and ethnicity across both time and geography. While W.E.B. Du Bois famously observed that the key issue of the 20th century would be the problem of the color line, the course ends by discussing the extent to which race, ethnicity and racism still matter, both sociologically and politically, in the 21st century. The course will be relevant to those students with an interest in critical theories of race and ethnicity and contemporary social theory.

EUS 346 • Sport And English Society-Eng

36465 • Spring 2013
(also listed as SOC 321K)

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Two page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

KIN 350 • Soc Aspect Sport/Phys Act-Eng

11425 • Spring 2013

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Two page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

KIN 350 • Soc Aspect Sport/Phys Act-Eng

11450 • Spring 2012

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Two page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

SOC 321K • Sport And English Society-Eng

45555 • Spring 2012

Description:

Sport occupies a significant place within English society; from the centrality of cricket in helping to shape the British empire, to the importance of soccer (“football”) in promoting the varied national identities within the UK and Northern Ireland, to the ways in which women and racial minorities have used sport to achieve social mobility and recognition, sport remains one of the most important ways to understand the changing nature of English society in the 21st century.  The course is located in Leeds, a diverse metropolis, known for its culture and sporting teams. Given this unique location, the Maymester enables students to explore the internal divisions around class and region that are central to understanding English identity, particularly the tensions between “the north” and “the south”, as well as discover the origins of American football and baseball.

Assessment criteria:

40% - Two page critical summary of each field trip (each summary will be worth 10% of final grade).

60% - Final synoptic ten page essay drawing on the lectures, field trips and readings – essay title to be agreed with Professor Ben Carrington.

SOC 394K • Crit Theories On Race & Racism

46315 • Spring 2011
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM BUR 214

Course Description

This course introduces students to critical, global perspectives on race, ethnicity and racism. Through a series of close readings of key texts the course examines the historical relationship between the emergence of ideas about race and Western modernity. The course is divided into two parts. Part I examines the importance of slavery and European colonialism in producing modern understandings of race and racial difference. We look at how the social sciences themselves have been implicated in the production of racialized ways of seeing and knowing both the (Western) Self and the (abject) Other: the "West" and _the Rest_. Part I concludes by examining the interrelationships between race, gender, sexuality and nation in the colonial setting. Part II examines contemporary racial formation in the period after the anti-colonial struggles of the mid-20th century. Key here are the ways in which social theorists have sought to understand both the continuities and discontinuities of colonial regimes in structuring societies in the West, and elsewhere. Part II thus focuses on questions of State formation, anti-racist political struggle, and the politics of identity in relation to questions of ethnicity. A key aspect of this course is its focus on the global dimensions and manifestations of racism and ethnicity. Although historical and contemporary debates concerning the articulation of race and the ethnicity within the U.S. remain central to many of the readings and class discussions, the course aims to provide a broader, contextual understanding of the changing nature of race and ethnicity across both time and geography. While W.E.B. Du Bois famously observed that the key issue of the 20th century would be the problem of the color line, the course ends by discussing the extent to which race, ethnicity and racism still matter, both sociologically and politically, in the 21st century. The course will be relevant to those students with an interest in critical theories of race and ethnicity and contemporary social theory.

 

 

 

AFR 374D • Race, Sport, And Identity

35365 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 231
(also listed as SOC 322R)

Meets with AFR 374D/35365

Carries a Writing Flag.

SOC F321K • The Sociology Of Sport

87995 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM UTC 1.102

Course Description

This course introduces students to the sociology of sport. The course is divided into two parts. Part one examines the place of sport within social theory, in particular the understanding of sport and society found in functionalist, Weberian, Marxist, and feminist accounts. Part two of the course uses this theoretical framework in order to understand key social issues in sport. These include gender and ideology, violence and deviancy, commercialization and college sport, race and inequality, and media and representation. The course will be relevant to those with an interest in both sociological theory and contemporary sporting cultures.

 

Grading Policy

Attendance 10%
Mid-semester multiple choice exam covering aspects of sport and social theory 30% 
Four page critical review of a journal article 30%
End-of-semester test covering sport and social issues 30%

 

Texts

Coakley, J. and Dunning, E. (eds.) (2000) "Handbook of Sport Studies" (Sage)
Coakley, J. (2009, 10th edition) "Sports in Society: Issues and Controversies" (McGraw-Hill)

 

SOC 394K • Crit Theories On Race & Racism

46590 • Spring 2010
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM BUR 214

 Course Description

This course introduces students to critical, global perspectives on race, ethnicity and racism. Through a series of close readings of key texts the course examines the historical relationship between the emergence of ideas about race and Western modernity. The course is divided into two parts. Part I examines the importance of slavery and European colonialism in producing modern understandings of race and racial difference. We look at how the social sciences themselves have been implicated in the production of racialized ways of seeing and knowing both the (Western) Self and the (abject) Other: the "West" and _the Rest_. Part I concludes by examining the interrelationships between race, gender, sexuality and nation in the colonial setting. Part II examines contemporary racial formation in the period after the anti-colonial struggles of the mid-20th century. Key here are the ways in which social theorists have sought to understand both the continuities and discontinuities of colonial regimes in structuring societies in the West, and elsewhere. Part II thus focuses on questions of State formation, anti-racist political struggle, and the politics of identity in relation to questions of ethnicity. A key aspect of this course is its focus on the global dimensions and manifestations of racism and ethnicity. Although historical and contemporary debates concerning the articulation of race and the ethnicity within the U.S. remain central to many of the readings and class discussions, the course aims to provide a broader, contextual understanding of the changing nature of race and ethnicity across both time and geography. While W.E.B. Du Bois famously observed that the key issue of the 20th century would be the problem of the color line, the course ends by discussing the extent to which race, ethnicity and racism still matter, both sociologically and politically, in the 21st century. The course will be relevant to those students with an interest in critical theories of race and ethnicity and contemporary social theory.

 

 

 

AFR 374D • Race, Sport, And Identity-W

35790 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 231

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374D • Race, Sport, And Identity-W

36013 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 127

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374D • Race, Sport, And Identity-W

36509 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 231

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374D • Race, Sport, And Identity-W

36025 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 2.124

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374D • Race, Sport, And Identity-W

34015 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 214

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374D • Race, Sport, And Identity-W

32953 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 231

Please check back for updates.

Publications


Andrews, D. and Carrington, B. (eds.) (2013) A Companion to Sport, Blackwell, Oxford/Malden.

Carrington, B. (2010) Race, Sport and Politics: The sporting black diaspora, Sage, London/Thousand Oaks.

Carrington, B. and McDonald, I. (eds.) (2009) Marxism, Cultural Studies and Sport, Routledge, London/New York.

Carrington, B. and McDonald, I. (eds.) (2001) “Race”, Sport and British Society, Routledge, London/New York.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links