Center for Asian American Studies
Center for Asian American Studies

Aarti Bhalodia


LecturerPh.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Aarti Bhalodia

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Courses


AAS 330 • Sociology Of Race And Work

36040 • Fall 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GEA 127
(also listed as SOC 321R, WGS 322)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in US

Course Description
Work is a central activity in the lives of most people. Along with providing an income, the type of work one does shapes the worker’s sense of personal identity. Social interaction in the work place provides workers with a set of skills, values, and mindset that influences how the work is done. Structure of a society determines the kind of work it does, who does what type of work, and how much people are paid for their efforts. In United States, individuals’ racial and gender characteristics deeply shape how labor markets emerge and how skills are evaluated. Jobs are often gender segregated and men and women are remunerated differently. This course is a critical examination of work through a gendered and racial lens. The purpose of this course is to examine concepts such as labor markets, globalization, racial segregation, and gendering of the work place. This course is cross-listed with Asian American Studies and Women’s Studies.
 
Course Objectives
Students will be able to sociologically identify concepts such as global markets, transnational labor, care work, service industry, gendered work, and racial segregation in the work place.  A majority of the readings, films, and class meetings will focus on contemporary work environment. Students will examine workers in the retail industry, care workers such as nannies, maids, and nurses, transnational workers in the STEM fields, and migrant labor. We will start the class with a survey of different forms of labor throughout United States’ history.  Students will be able to make historical connections between American citizenship, work, and value of one’s labor.

Readings
Selected chapters from the following:

Skhlar. Judith. American Citizenship: The Quest for Inclusion. Harvard University Press. Any Edition.
 
Lowe, Lisa. Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics. Duke University Press. 1996.

Wharton, Amy edited. Working in America: Continuity, Conflict, and Change in a New Economic Era. Routledge. 2016.
 
Ngai, Mae. Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America. Princeton University Press. 2004.
 
Wright, Melissa. Disposable Women and Other Myths of Global Capitalism. Taylor and Francis. 2013.
 
Thistle, Susan. From Marriage to the Market: The Transformation of Women’s Lives and Work. University of California Press. 2006.
 
Assignments and Grading
Attendance and participation: 20%
Two Essays: 40% (2x20)
Two Exams: 40% (2x20)

AAS F312 • Intro To Asian American Hist

81930 • Summer 2017
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GDC 4.302
(also listed as HIS F317L)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Course Description
This course covers the history of people of Asian descent in the United States from late 16th century to present day. Students will be introduced to key themes in Asian American history by exploring the crucial roles Asians have played in framing American ideas and institutions regarding citizenship, national belonging, border control, and multiracial democracy. For each Asian American ethnic and national group we will examine the causes of migration and the development of Asian American communities over time. Through the semester the course will highlight diversity within the Asian American community. Course material will also focus on shared experiences of oppression, marginalization, and political activism.
 

Course Objectives
Students will be able to identify major concepts in the field of Asian American history and connect them to broader themes in U.S. history. Through historical works, primary sources, films, and class meetings, students will study the historical changes and continuities in the lives of Asian Americans. On successful completion of the course students should be able to understand how race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality have shaped the Asian American experience. This class will compare experiences of different Asian American groups and highlight the similarities and differences. Students will also study how the Asian American story intersects with experiences of other racial and ethnic groups in American society.

Required Readings
Textbook: Erike Lee, The Making of Asian America: A History (New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 2015). PCL Reserves and Center for Asian American Studies Library Burdine Hall 556.
 
Articles on Canvas – These are mainly primary source documents.
 
Assignments and Grading
Attendance and participation: 10%
Exam 1: 30%
Exam 2: 30%
Exam 3: 30%

AAS 325 • South Asian Migration To Us

35935 • Spring 2017
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CMA 3.114
(also listed as ANS 372, HIS 365G, WGS 340)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

This course examines the South Asian diaspora in United States. We will cover migration of people from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal to United States and other parts of the world. While studying the history and culture of South Asian America, we will discuss globalization, transnationalism, migration, assimilation, formation of a diaspora, discrimination, and gender and sexuality, all major themes in Asian American Studies. The course is arranged chronologically and thematically. We will start in the nineteenth century following the journey of the first South Asian migrants to US. We will then move on to studying the Bengali and Punjabi immigrants to U.S. and the formation of Bengali-African and Punjabi-Mexican communities. We will study the effects of the 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act on South Asian migration to US. Topics covered include economic and social reasons for migration, adaptation to American life, cultural and religious assimilation, changing family structures, and discrimination and exclusion. We will end the semester by discussing South Asian American life in the twenty-first century.

 

Course Objectives

 

Through the semester we will study more than a century of South Asian American history. A primary goal of this course is to highlight the diversity in South Asian America. We will encounter a diaspora whose members belong to different religious, linguistic, economic and social groups. Many came to the United States forcibly to seek economic opportunities lacking at home. Others came enthusiastically with dreams of making it “big” in the land of abundant opportunities. We will ask ourselves how monolithic is the South Asian community? We will also examine South Asian American interactions with other Asian American groups in the fields of social activism and community development.

 

Assignments and Grading

 

15%   Attendance and participation

25%   Exam 1

25%   Exam 2

5%     Research paper topic and bibliography

5%     Research paper presentation

 

25%   Research paper

 

Textbook: Karen Isaken Leonard, The South Asian Americans (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1997). 

 

Selections from the following:

 Vivek Bald, Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2013).        

 

 Judith M. Brown, Global South Asians: Introducing the Modern Diaspora (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006).       

 

Shamita Das Gupta edited, A Patchwork Shawl: Chronicles of South Asian Women in America (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1998).        

 

Khyati Y. Joshi and Jigna Desai, Asian Americans in Dixie: Race and Migration in the South (University of Illinois Press, 2013)     

 

Susan Kosby and R. Radhakrishnan edited, Transnational South Asians: The Making of a Neo-Diaspora (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).

 

Karen  Isaken  Leonard,  Making Ethnic Choices: California’s Punjabi Mexican Americans (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992).

AAS 330 • Sociology Of Race And Work

35845 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CMA 3.114
(also listed as SOC 321R, WGS 322)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

This course is a critical examination of work through a gendered and racial lens. Individuals’ racial and gender characteristics deeply shape how labor markets emerge and how skills are evaluated. Jobs are often gender segregated and men and women are remunerated differently. The purpose of this course is to examine concepts such as labor markets, globalization, racial segregation, and gendering of the work place. This course is cross-listed with Asian American Studies and Women’s Studies.

AAS F312 • Intro To Asian American Hist

82245 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GDC 4.302
(also listed as HIS F317L)

This class introduces key themes in Asian American history by exploring the crucial roles Asian have played in framing American ideas and institutions regarding citizenship, national belonging, border control, and multiracial democracy.  Seen as inassimilable aliens and essentially foreign, Asians were the first targets of legal immigration restrictions and enforcement.  Asian Americans persevered in continuing migration to establish communities and forge ethnic identities and cultures by claiming the promise  of equality in America.  We will consider variations on Asian American history and culture through memoirs, legal documents, cultural productions, media representations, and reinterpretations of mainstream tropes of American identity.

AAS 325 • South Asian Migration To Us

34980 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CMA 3.114
(also listed as ANS 372, HIS 365G)

FLAG: CD

Description:

This course examines the South Asian diaspora in United States. We will focus on Americans who trace their descent to India, Pakistan or Bangladesh. While studying the history and culture of South Asian America, we will discuss globalization, transnationalism, migration, assimilation, formation of a diaspora, discrimination, and gender and sexuality, all major themes in Asian American Studies. The course is arranged chronologically and thematically. We will start in the early twentieth century following the journey of the first South Asian migrants to arrive in California. The second part of the course will focus on the effects of the 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act. Topics covered include economic and social reasons for immigration, adaptation to American life, cultural and religious assimilation, changing family structures, and discrimination and exclusion. We will end the semester by discussing South Asian American life in the twenty-first century.

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

AAS 325 • South Asian Migration To Us

36275 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CMA 3.114
(also listed as ANS 372, HIS 365G)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

This course examines the South Asian diaspora in United States. We will focus on Americans who trace their descent to India, Pakistan or Bangladesh. While studying the history and culture of South Asian America, we will discuss globalization, transnationalism, migration, assimilation, formation of a diaspora, discrimination, and gender and sexuality, all major themes in Asian American Studies. The course is arranged chronologically and thematically. We will start in the early twentieth century following the journey of the first South Asian migrants to arrive in California. The second part of the course will focus on the effects of the 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act. Topics covered include economic and social reasons for immigration, adaptation to American life, cultural and religious assimilation, changing family structures, and discrimination and exclusion. We will end the semester by discussing South Asian American life in the twenty-first century.

This course may be used to fulfill three hours of the U.S. history component of the university core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, personal responsibility, and social responsibility.

AAS 325 • South Asian Migration To Us

36345 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 206
(also listed as ANS 372, HIS 365G)

Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

This course examines the South Asian diaspora in United States. We will focus on Americans who trace their descent to India, Pakistan or Bangladesh. While studying the history and culture of South Asian America, we will discuss globalization, transnationalism, migration, assimilation, formation of a diaspora, discrimination, and gender and sexuality, all major themes in Asian American Studies. The course is arranged chronologically and thematically. We will start in the early twentieth century following the journey of the first South Asian migrants to arrive in California. The second part of the course will focus on the effects of the 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act. Topics covered include economic and social reasons for immigration, adaptation to American life, cultural and religious assimilation, changing family structures, and discrimination and exclusion. We will end the semester by discussing South Asian American life in the twenty-first century.

 

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