Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Bio/Phys Anthropology

30965-31030 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM FAC 21
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This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

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ANT 301 • Bio/Phys Anthropology-Wb

31032 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

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ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31095-31110 • Merabet, Sofian
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

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ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31035-31090 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM WEL 1.308
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This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology-Honors

31115 • Slotta, James
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SAC 4.118
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.

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ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31120-31155 • Denbow, James
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM BEL 328
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This course provides an overview of world prehistory beginning with hominin evolution and continuing through the appearance of modern humans and their expansion through the Old World. We finish by talking about the appearance of humankind in the Americas, Rock Art, and the rise of complex societies such as Cahokia.in North America.  The course begins with an introduction to archaeological methods and techniques including survey and excavation methodologies, techniques used in the analysis of floral, faunal and human remains, and common relative and absolute dating techniques.  

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ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31160-31195 • Locker, Angelina
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM FAC 21
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

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ANT 304T • Intro To Texas Archaeology

31199 • Wade, Maria
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM
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People have been in Texas since about 12,000 years ago and the evidence of their presence throughout time is fascinating.  Ever wondered how we know and can prove that? This course introduces students to Texas archaeology through lectures, interactive virtual labs and hands-on laboratory sections that emphasize experimentation. Texas geographic and environmental diversity provided prehistoric and historic peoples with unique resources and possibilities, and people used that diversity to make choices and develop specific cultural characteristics while interacting with other peoples from the surrounding regions.

Doing archaeology requires teamwork, critical thinking and multidisciplinary approaches. In archaeology, it is often more important to ask relevant questions than provide ready answers. The lectures and labs in this course aim to emphasize these requirements as well as how archaeology relates to other sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the natural science and technology (Part II) component of the common core curriculum and addresses the following four core objectives established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board: communication skills, critical thinking skills, teamwork, and empirical and quantitative skills.

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ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

31200 • Campbell, Craig
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.112
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The purpose of this class is to focus on creative acts, events, and encounters. It is to develop tools for analyzing them. What is a Mexican border Corrido? What is the importance of mountains and rivers to Tuvan Xoomei singers? Why is the Victory Lounge located in East Austin? Who is Giveup, Fail, or Banksy? What is Christeene’s album “Waist up, kneeze down” all about? We’re asking questions of this world we live in; in this class we’re gathering, developing, and honing tools and tool kits for observation and description.

 

While we will study individual artists and creators as well as audiences we will also look at larger questions of tradition, continuity, change and expression. Central to this is an inquiry into the historicization of cultural assumptions. By pursuing this line of inquiry we will be developing a tool kit for thinking critically about the world around ourselves. Locating this in broader anthropological conversations, ‘Expressive Culture’ connects to critical world- shaping processes like representation, colonialism and imperial power, race and ethnicity, gender identity, pleasure, politics, and the everyday.

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ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31205 • Handman, Courtney
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.

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ANT 310L • Introduction To South Asia

31220 • Davis, Donald
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.128
(also listed as ANS 302K)
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Description:

This course introduces students to major thinkers, ideas, histories, issues, and movements of South Asia.  While a clear set of factual information will be integral to the course, the equally important goal of the course is to learn how to engage South Asia on terms similar to other courses in the liberal arts.  Stated plainly, we want to do more than learn about South Asia; we want to learn from it as well.  The institutional and traditional obstacle to this approach stems from the simple fact that most American students, whatever their ethnic origins, are taught that “our” intellectual heritage begins with the Greeks and ends with contemporary European and American thinkers.  The intellectual and cultural histories of East and West connect much more than most people know.  Yet, most of us are simply not taught how and why to understand South Asian (or other area) literatures, art, religion, law, or other cultural expressions as sources for our own humanistic and ethical development.  Thus, the primary goal of this course is to train students in how to “read” South Asia in such a way that it can mean something to them intellectually, professionally, and personally.


ANT 310L • Mex Amer/Lat Folk Across US

31215 • Gonzalez-Martin, Rachel
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 5.190
(also listed as MAS 319)
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This is an introductory course to the field of Folklore and ethnography among U.S. Latina/o communities. Folklore is the study of artistic communication in everyday life  and gaining meaning through its connections the contemporary and  historical contexts of its artists' communities. This course will introduce students to the form and function of basic genres of folklore study that take the form of verbal and material artistry.

These genres include, but are not limited to: Folk Speech, Jokes, Riddles, Narratives, Festivals, Food Culture, Religion and Spirituality, Body Art and Material Culture.

This course examines  the use of everyday artistry  amongst regional  U.S. Latino communities. As a group, students will be asked to discuss the similarities and  variations  of Latino cultural communities across the United  States  through their expressive traditions. These will include discussions of such communities as Mexican Americans across the Southwest, Dominican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Midwestern Latinos and transnational Latino migrants in the New  South. The examination of everyday artistry will illustrate the process by which U.S. Latina/o communities express their Latino identities differently based on experiences of race, class, region  and migration  experiences. It will further shed light on larger national  (mis)understandings of U.S. Latina/a communities as socially unified, but not culturally homogenous communities of exiles, migrants, nationals, citizens and refugee Americans.

Tentative Grading Policy:

  • Minute papers: 5%
  • Field Write-Ups: 10%
  • Unit Reivew Essays: 25%
  • Writing Meeting: 5%
  • Midterm Exam: 20%
  • Final Exam: 15%
  • Final Collection Portfolio: 20%

ANT 320L • Amer Indian Langs And Culs

31230 • Webster, Anthony
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.118
(also listed as LIN 373)
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This course explores the myriad of indigenous languages of the North America and how they are intertwined with culture. The focus of this course is both descriptive and anthropological. That is, the indigenous languages of the Americas will be considered with respect to their phonologies, complex morphologies, discursive structures, and historical relations as well as their place within the sociocultural milieu of speakers. Language is made real in use. We will look to the uses and users of language.

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ANT 320L • Lang Endangerment/Rights

31225 • Slotta, James
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as LIN 373)
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The 21st century, linguists say, will see the “death or doom” of 90 percent of the world’s languages. In response, non-governmental organizations, academics, and activists have responded with campaigns to preserve and revitalize “dying” languages. At the same time, lawyers, legislators, and political theorists have built the groundwork for the
recognition of “language rights” as a tool for defending small-scale and minority language communities against the spread of national and global languages. In this course, we examine such efforts in order to ask: why does the idea of language death inspire all of this work and attention? What is “a language” – what properties are seen to inhere in language – that drives these activities? Here we will explore views of language that underpin the anxieties and efforts of the language rights and revitalization movements: from the place of language in the 19th and 20th century politics of national autonomy to the role of language as a repository of worldviews and an emblem of our shared humanity. In the process, we see how “language” and distinct “languages” are situated at the center of Western imaginations of community and moral anxieties over autonomy, with all of the political and ethical implications that result for people who are recognized as having their own language as well as those who recognize the “languagedness” of others.

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ANT 322M • Mexican Immigratn Cul Hist

31235 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WEL 2.308
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
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This course seeks to develop a student's understanding of the history of Mexican immigration to the U.S. It will provide an overview of migratory patterns dating back to the late pre-historic period through contemporary times. The focus of the course, however, will be current immigration issues dealing with: 1) causes of Mexican immigration: globalization, Mexican politics, agribusiness, 2) U.S. Law, 3) incorporation, and 4) citizenship. 

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ANT 324L • Archaeol Of African Thought

31300 • Denbow, James
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.174
(also listed as AFR 372G, ANT 380K)
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This course uses archaeological, anthropological and historical works to examine the development and transformation of African societies from the Neolithic through the slave trade and the beginning of the colonial period. The course will discuss the historic and prehistoric foundations of contemporary African societies south of the Sahara, focusing especially on equatorial and southern Africa. The intention is to develop an understanding of the cultural dynamics of African societies and traditions, and their transformations through time. This provides an interpretive framework from which to examine emerging archaeological perspectives on the Atlantic slave trade and the cultural foundations of the Diaspora in the New World. 

 

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ANT 324L • Archaeol Of Climate Change

31310 • Rosen, Arlene
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 224
(also listed as GRG 356)
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Course Description: Climate change has impacted human societies over the course of human existence on the planet. It has played a role in everything from hominin evolution to the rise and fall of civilizations through to the present day economic and ethical decision-making. In this course we will examine why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and discuss case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems. We will explore aspects of resilience and rigidity of societies and issues of environmental sustainability in the past as well as the present. Finally we will compare and contrast modern responses to climate change on a global scale with those of past societies.

Goals: To familiarize students with the evidence for climate change and methods of climate change research; to increase their understanding of the social, economic and technological issues human societies faced in the past when dealing with climate change. To understand what were adaptive and maladaptive human strategies. To help students evaluate the modern politics and social responses to climate change. On successful completion of this course a student should understand how climate change is recorded and the basic climatic record for the period of human occupation of the earth. To be familiar with current debates about how human societies adapt to climate change. To be able to think critically about issues and arguments proposed in the literature, and to write a coherent essay arguing a point of view. 

Climate change has impacted human societies over the course of human existence on the planet. It has played a role in everything from hominin evolution to the rise and fall of civilizations through to the present day economic and ethical decision-making. In this course we will examine why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and discuss case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems. We will explore aspects of resilience and rigidity of societies and issues of environmental sustainability in the past as well as the present. Finally we will compare and contrast modern responses to climate change on a global scale with those of past societies. 

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ANT 324L • Blacks/Asians: Race/Soc Movmnt

31245 • Nie, Phonshia
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM CLA 1.102
(also listed as AAS 330, AFR 374D)
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Flag: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Why or why not do Asian Americans support affirmative action? Black Lives Matter? What role did race play in community support for/against Peter Liang’s reduced conviction after killing African American Akai Gurley? What role did race play when African Americans destroyed Korean-owned property and businesses during the LA Riots? How do we explain and overcome racial tensions between African American and Asian American communities?

 

In this course, we explore answers to these questions by tracing the historical roots of Asian and Black relations in the U.S. We begin by covering topics that are foundational to understanding the racialization of Asians and Blacks in the U.S. Topics include theories of race/racialization, early Afro Asian international connections, and the impact of World War II on interracial relations. We will then navigate key points of conflict and collaboration between Asians and Blacks in history. Topics include the Third World movement/internationalism, Afro Asian feminisms, the LA Riots, the model minority myth, affirmative action, hip hop and rap, and politics. This broad survey of Asian Black relations provides students a solid understanding of the many differences that divide communities of color and encourages students to consider effective strategies for building multiracial alliances.

 

Grading Breakdown

10 x 2.5% = 25%   In-Class Written Responses/Quizzes

2 x 20% = 40%      Response Papers

35%                      Final Research Paper 


ANT 324L • Digital Dat Sys In Archaeol

31315 • Jarvis, Jonathan
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM T5D 1.102
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This course provides the basic knowledge and skills needed to operate digital equipment (e.g., GPS and Total Data Stations) commonly used for collecting location data on archaeological sites. Classroom instruction on mapping and grid systems will be translated into "hands-on" instrument operation in simulated archaeological field conditions. An introduction to GIS software and its applications in archaeology will be provided. Data collected during simulated field operations will be processed and mapped using GIS software. An overview of near-surface sensing techniques, including a field demonstration with a magnetometer, will be included. 

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ANT 324L • Ethnographic Writing

31309 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets TH 12:30PM-3:30PM SAC 5.118
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Ethnography means writing difference.

This is a writing workshop. Students will keep free-writing journals and write four essays, each of which will be built through 4 drafts. We will read one another’s writings and give useful comments. In class we will proceed through a series of exercises and workshops in doing ethnography, writing and reading. We will experiment with how to writing about objects, places, scenes and situations, characters, forms of attention, and sensibilities. 

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. 

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ANT 324L • Global Indigenous Issues

31305 • Canova, Paola
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.120
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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This course examines contemporary issues facing indigenous peoples around the world. It takes an historical and ethnographic approach to critically analyzing the ways in which indigenous peoples have been impacted and continue to respond to forces such as colonialism and capitalism in different regions. Drawing on topics such Contact and Colonial Expansion, Self Determination the Nation State, Human Rights, Gender, Ecologies, and Social Movements, the course will explore the lived realities of different cultures, examine the impact from European contact up to the present, and discuss major contemporary issues facing indigenous peoples today. 

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ANT 324L • Intro Ethnograph Meth-S F

31259 • Jones, Omi
(also listed as AFR 372E)
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Course Description

In this course, students will study ethnographic methods including observant participation, interviewing, and oral histories.  Archival research will also be conducted.   Students will apply the techniques they learn toward an investigation of Black out-migration in San Francisco giving particular emphasis to the Fillmore District, Bayview-Hunter’s Point, and the Tenderloin.  This course provides students with skills in critical ethnography by foregrounding the racial politics that shape community-building and policy-making.

 

Reading

Madison, D. Soyini. Critical Ethnography. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publishers, 2012

 

Grading

Research Proposal                            10 pts.

Interview Presentation                    5 pts.

Oral History Presentation                5 pts.

Fieldwork Notebook (I & II)             30 pts.

Research Paper                                 30 pts.

2-minute essay (5/2 pts.)                10 pts.

Participation                                      10 pts.

 

TOTAL                                                100 pts.


ANT 324L • Japan Rel & Westrn Imagination

31260 • Traphagan, John
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CMA 3.114
(also listed as ANS 340, R S 352)
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Description:

This course focuses on how Japanese religious traditions, particularly Zen, have been viewed from the perspective of people living in non-Japanese societies since the end of World War II. Using Ruth Benedict’s book The Chrysanthemum and the Sword as a starting point, we will explore different ways in which non-Japanese have imagined Japanese religious and ethical ideas and both explained Japanese behavior and adopted (often stereotyped) ideas about Japan into their writings about philosophy and life.

 

Texts:

We will discuss and deconstruct works by authors such as Alan Watts, Eugene Herrigel, (Zen in the Art of Archery), and Robert Pirsig (Zen in the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance) as a framework for thinking about how Japanese religious and ethical ideas have been imagined in the West.

 

Requirements:

  • Weekly reading reaction papers, 30%
  • Final, take home exam, 40%
  • Group project, 30% 

ANT 324L • Nature, Society, & Adaptatn

31295 • Knapp, Gregory
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.106
(also listed as GRG 331K)
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This course examines the very long-term human trajectory in gaining control over resources, impacting the environment, and transforming planet earth into a meaningful human home. This trajectory has been related to long-term changes in human integration (reciprocity, trade, and redistribution) at a variety of scales, culminating in recent globalization. These changes have been associated with great achievements in quality of life for some, but with attendant problems of violence, impoverishment, and environmental impacts including, in some extreme cases, collapse. These challenges implicate both culture (learned habitual behavior, concepts, and associated objects and landscapes) and ethics (socialy oriented decisions) as they promote or fail to promote resilience and adaptation with respect for human rights.

The course will discuss major transformations: the origins of the human species, the domestication of plants and animals, the rise of agricultural societies and urban civilizations, global mercantile colonialism, and modernization and urbanization. Attention will be paid to the theories and works of geographers, ecological anthropologists, environmental historians, and others. Lectures and student-proctored discussions examine selected strategies employed by humans to cope with the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities presented by different natural environments, with special attention to foraging, food, and farming. The course will also provide an introduction to ethical and policy issues surrounding sustainable development and alternative futures. Grading is based on attendance and participation, numerous writing assignments, oral presentations, and proctoring.

The course has a Writing Flag and an Ethics and Leadership Flag. It can be used to meet the core requirements for the Sustainability or the Cultural Geography tracks in the Geography major, and the upper division course requirements in the Anthropology major. It also can be used for the International Relations and Global Studies Major. 

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ANT 324L • Political Ecology

31270 • Cons, Jason
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.120
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Over the past three decades, Political Ecology has emerged as a powerful interdisciplinary critique of ecological change. Simply put, Political Ecology is a strategy for mapping political, economic, and social factors onto questions of environmental degradation and transformation. Political Ecology has been a powerful strategy for reinserting politics into apolitical discussions of ecology and the environment; writing disposed groups—human and non-human—back into discussions about conservation; and unsettling common sense understandings of “the environment” as separate from “the social.” This course will provide an introduction to core tenets of political ecology. Particularly focusing on ethnographic approaches, this course will introduce students to key debates in the field—such as the relationship between environment and violence, the critique of Malthusian and neo-Malthusian notions of scarcity and limits, the links between conservation and dispossession, and more. It will further explore the uses of political ecology in key contemporary debates over social and environmental change—from food production to water management. 

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ANT 324L • Science/Magic/Religion

31275 • Crosson, Jonathan
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM WEL 2.312
(also listed as AFR 372G, AMS 327, R S 373)
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Description: 

In this course, we will interrogate the concepts of magic, science, and religion as culturally and historically constructed categories.  We will critically examine how the construction of science and religion, as well as the opposition of empirical knowledge and belief, were central to both the Enlightenment and the formation of the social and natural sciences.  Drawing on recent critiques of these foundational distinctions, we will question common-sense understandings of these categories and their relations, exploring the following questions:

  • How did the experimental sciences emerge out practices of “natural magic” or evidence law?
  • How do our notions of religion and science reflect certain assumptions?  What are other ways of categorizing practices we might deem as religion or science?
  • How have the divisions between science, magic and religion, or between rationality and superstition, undergirded projects of modernity, colonization, and development?

 

Texts:

  • Danny Burton and David Grandy.  Magic, Mystery, and Science.
  • George Saliba.  Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance.
  • Helen Verran.  Science and an African Logic.
  • Karol Weaver.  Medical Revolutionaries:  The Enslaved Healers of Eighteenth Century Saint Domingue.
  • Harry West.  Ethnographic Sorcery.

 

Grading:

  • Eight Reading Quizzes (35%)
  • Topic, Research Question, and Thesis Statement (5%)
  • Revised Thesis Statement + Draft of Introduction + Outline of Paper (10 %)
  • Final Paper (30%)
  • Participation in Class Discussions (10%)
  • Oral Presentation (10%)

ANT 324L • The Two Koreas And The US

31280 • Oppenheim, Robert
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.118
(also listed as AAS 325, ANS 361, GOV 360N, HIS 364G)
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Description:

This course will examine the production, distribution, and consumption of East Asian popular culture. Specific topics include Hong Kong cinema, Japanese animation, Japanese trendy dramas, Korean television dramas, and K-pop music. Noting the “globalization” phenomenon, this course will address what has caused the increasing visibility of East Asian cultural products outside of the region. The growing recognition of East Asian pop culture around the globe, however, has also accompanied by more vibrant circulations of the cultural products and interactions among recipients within the region. Therefore, this course will take the globalization of popular culture as an analytical lens through which to reflect modernity, tensions of (trans)nationalism, urbanization, gender politics, and identity formations in East Asia.


ANT 324L • Veiling In The Muslim World

31285 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as ANS 372, ISL 372, MEL 321, R S 358, SOC 321K, WGS 340)
show description

Description:

This course will deal with the cultural significance and historical practices of veiling, “Hijab”, in the Muslim world. The issue of veiling as it relates to women has been subject to different interpretations and viewed from various perspectives, and with recent political developments and the resurgence of Islam, the debate over it and over women’s roles in Muslim countries has taken various shapes.  A number of Muslim countries are going back to their Islamic traditions and implementing a code of behavior that involves some form of veiling in Public /or segregation to various degrees for women. In some Muslim nations women are re-veiling on their own. In others, women resist the enforcement of such practices. We will examine the various perspectives, interpretations and practices relating to Hijab in the Muslim world with respect to politics, religion, feminism, culture, new wave of women converts and the phenomenon of “Islamic fashion” as a marketing tool.    

Prerequisites:  Upper Division Standing

Grading:

Active participation (assigned article with discussion questions/ is a group activity) 10%

Regular Class Attendance 5%

3 quizzes (Lowest grade will be dropped) 20%

Midterm Exam 30%

Final Research Paper (20%), and Oral Presentation %15 (This is a group activity)

Texts**

1- Reader Packet. 

Book:

 Faegheh Shirazi. The Veil Unveiled: Hijab in Modern Culture. University Press of Florida, 2001, 2003 

 ** I suggest that you to order this book as soon as possible on line from any vender that you normally purchase your books. I have been pleased with amazon.com since I am always able to find used books in good conditions. Another good book store with discount prices will be Half Price Books.

I will announce when the Reader Packet is ready for purchase. We will start with the text first.


ANT 325J • The Photographic Image

31325-31330 • Campbell, Craig
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:30PM SAC 4.118
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"The Photographic Image" applies concepts and practices from visual ethnography to the study of memory, place, and everyday life. The course aims at developing counter-intuitive and subversive approaches to practices of looking and techniques of representation. Whereas photographs are often taken to be static representations of the world, we will invert this idea and explore how images can be transient and ephemeral by focusing not only on how to produce images but how they are 'read' by others.

 

The class is planned around multiple photo-based projects. You will be required to read for these projects and undertake original photography assignments. At all points in the course students are drawn into the use of image-making as an interpretive and critical engagement with course readings. We will begin with techniques of visual inquiry established by visual anthropologists, documentarians, and artists working on the margins of documentary traditions. Students are expected to engage fully in both individual and group activities. Students are expected to have at their disposal a camera (digital or analogue).

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ANT 325L • Cultrl Heritage On Display

31340 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118
(also listed as AMS 321)
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This course is designed to take you behind the scenes in the public construction, negotiation, and display of “American culture” by focusing on a number of cultural heritage sites in the public sphere. In particular, the course will examine fairs, festivals, theme parks, history sites, and museum exhibitions as contested sites of heritage production in American history—focusing especially on those moments when defining and displaying an image or event in American history becomes an active agent in the process of nation building and ideological construction. We will focus closely on the histories and agencies of specific “exhibitionary complexes,” paying close attention to what one critic calls ‘the problematic relationship of their objects to the instruments of their display.” (Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett). Each student will have the opportunity to participate directly in creating and/or critiquing a cultural heritage site (including its methods of production, documentation, and display). Students will have an opportunity to conduct original field research, plan, design and critique a mock exhibit, heritage site or theme park, and critically analyze an historic example of cultural heritage production. 


ANT 325L • Cultures Of Sustainability

31335 • Hartigan, John
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 4.118
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This course guides students in recognizing how ecological concerns are articulated and perceived in different cultural contexts. Environmentalists in the U.S. and Europe often face challenges both in convincing peoples around the world to participate in conservation projects and in recognizing local, situated (particularly indigenous) forms of caring about ecological health and social equity. Notions of “nature” are fundamentally culture-bound, entangled with concepts of personhood and agency, power and risk, and cosmological orderings of humans and nonhumans. Beginning with an explanation of culture and its dynamics, this course will survey ecological activities in a range of settings (China, Indonesia, Brazil, and Europe), providing students a comparative framework for recognizing the criteria mobilized as people assess whether or how their environments are in peril. The analytical foundation is anthropological, emphasizing biocultural perspectives and recent work in cultural ecology, but the course will encourage interdisciplinary formulations of student research projects. Some of our case-studies will draw from science and technology studies, and students will be assisted in developing proposals that tap and mobilize various forms of expertise and knowledge claims. We will also spend time considering disciplinary debates over the Anthropocene (how to understand its dimensions and consequences) and sampling the exciting new development of “multispecies ethnography” (projects that analyze nonhumans’ roles in social and political formations).  

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ANT 325L • Jewish Cuba

31337 • Weinreb, Amelia
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174
(also listed as J S 365, LAS 324L, R S 366)
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Cuba has a small Jewish community (between 1,000-1,500) whose origins are presumed to date back to 1492. By some accounts, the contemporary community is dying, and by others, it is vibrant. No matter the assessment, it is a community that has been written about and analyzed disproportionately for its size. As noted Cuban-American Jewish anthropologist Ruth Behar has proposed, Jewish Cuba presents the challenge of focusing on a small community to understand large philosophical and cultural issues: Diaspora, preserving identity in hybridized social worlds, and the concept of home. In learning about Jewish Cuba, students of are not only exposed to a nationally-specific case study in Jewish Latin America, but have the opportunity to study the relationship between state politics and Jewish life, Judaism under communist regimes, religious and linguistic revitalization movements, migration, and cultural survival. To explore these themes and concepts, this course uses scholarly texts and ethnographic accounts, but also personal memoirs, films, photographs, and documentaries about Jewish Cuba.

Core questions we address in the course are: What is Home? What is Diaspora? What is Revolution?  How do we write about it?


ANT 326C • Native Americans In Texas

31345 • Wade, Maria
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174
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The past pursues us into the future. Archaeologists and historians learn about Native American groups in three ways: archaeological artifacts, texts written by Europeans after the latter arrived in the New World and Native American oral history accounts. This course is designed to 1) expose the students to these three sources of information, 2) familiarize students with the earliest narratives written by the European explorers who entered Texas, 3) develop skills and strategies to read, analyze, and extract information from these documents, and 4) engage in discussions of the evidence for Native American cultural behavior, resource utilization, conflict, disease, and related topics. The course uses concepts and evidence from Anthropology, History, Archaeology, Historical Geography and Native American Studies, and it is structured to provide information to students interested in those disciplines. 

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ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

31350 • Wilson, Samuel
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 2.308
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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"Cultures in Contact" is a multi-disciplinary course which combines Historical, Anthropological, Geographical and Literary analyses of the continuing "contact period" in the New World. The issues addressed span the last 500+ years of cultural interaction in the Americas, looking especially at the processes of cultural conflict, competition, cooperation, and synthesis that have taken place among people from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia. 

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ANT 330C • Theories Of Culture & Society

31353 • Keeler, Ward
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118
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The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the most important theoretical contributions made to the study of culture and society since the nineteenth century. The first half of the course is devoted largely to reading the great systems builders of the social sciences: Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Freud. All of their ideas have been under attack for decades, but their thinking still pervades the social sciences and must be reckoned with. We then turn to figures influential primarily in the history of anthropology, and finally, to recent and contemporary writers in the social sciences whose ideas fuel ongoing debates in anthropology today. The course is conceived primarily for majors but above all for students who are committed to working with difficult, influential, and fascinating texts.

The course combines both lecture, on Thursdays, and seminar discussion, on Tuesdays. Seminar discussion will be based in most cases on short written assignments submitted before class. Attending lectures and seminar discussion is required, and absences must be explained.

The course integrates an intense and demanding regime of reading and discussion with an equally intense and demanding program of writing. In order to assist students with their writing, a portion of every Tuesday class will be devoted to discussing writing. The aim is to encourage students to develop the habit of writing clear and concise prose, organized in such a way that a reader is aware of the overall structure of each sentence, paragraph, and essay.

Note that this course satisfies the criteria of a "Writing Flag" course. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. 

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ANT 340C • Ethnographic Research Methods

31360 • Sturm, Circe
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118
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Understanding human behavior is immensely challenging. Fortunately, there are tools

to help us make sense of social, cultural and political complexity. This course offers an

introduction to the various methods and techniques used in conducting ethnographic

research such as participant observation, interviewing, collecting life histories and

genealogies, archival research, working with material culture, social media-based

research, and visual ethnography. Our primary objectives will be to explore research

design, what constitutes evidence, how to analyze data, and strategies for writing up

and presenting results. We will pay particular attention to the ethical considerations

entailed in anthropological research, including questions of knowledge production,

power, location, experience, translation and representation. The course is run largely as

a “hands–on” workshop, in which students practice a variety of ethnographic methods

(both inside and outside of class), engage in ethnographic writing exercises, and actively

guide one another’s work. Students will apply what they learn during the course to

designing their own ethnographic research project, conducting independent field

research, and presenting their findings to the class. By the end of the semester, they will

have a firm grounding in ethnographic research methods and be better prepared for

more advanced work.


ANT 348 • Human Origins And Evolution

31365-31380 • Kappelman, John
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 5.172
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This course examines the evidence for the origin and evolution of humans with particular emphasis placed on reconstructing the paleobiology of extinct hominins.  Lectures will draw upon a diverse range of disciplines (anatomy, archaeology, ecology, ethology, genetics, geology, paleontology) and integrate these into a framework for understanding the origin and evolutionary history of this unusual group of primates.  Weekly laboratories provide the student with an opportunity to examine firsthand the fossil evidence for human evolution.

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ANT 349C • Human Variation

31385-31395 • Bolnick, Deborah
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 112
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This course surveys the patterns of biological variation within and between human populations.  We will examine physical, genetic, and behavioral traits, and consider both the microevolutionary and cultural processes that influence those traits.  We will also discuss how studies of human variation have impacted society in the past and present.  Topics include:  an overview of the principles of genetics and evolution, race, sex differences, human variability in behavior, eugenics and contemporary genetic issues, human plasticity, and disease.

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ANT 351E • Primate Evolution

31400 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.172
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This course is an examination of the fossil record for (nonhuman) primate evolution.  The fossil record will be examined after a basic grounding in the anatomy, ecology, and systematics of living primates.  Each of the major radiations of fossil primates will be explored with respect to adaptive diversity, functional morphology, and systematics.

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ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

31355 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174
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An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

There is a two hour lab section associated with this class.

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