Department of Anthropology

ANT 301 • Bio/Phys Anthropology

31115-31180 • Kirk, Edward
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM FAC 21
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This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 301 • Bio/Phys Anthropology-Wb

31185 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31220-31255 • Hartigan, John
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:00PM ART 1.102
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31190-31215 • Slotta, James
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM CLA 0.126
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 302 • Cultural Anthropology

31260 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM
show description

This course focuses on "classic" themes in anthropology such as ethnicity, language, adaptation, marriage, kinship, gender, religion, and social stratification.  We will consider anthropological theory from its 19th-century origins to the present.  The course also explores the nature of ethnographic field work, especially the relationship between the anthropologist and the field community.  
The lectures, readings, and films for this course have been selected with the objective of exploring the social meanings with which diverse groups invest their life.  By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences between "us" and "others," both within the borders of the U.S. and abroad, the anthropological perspective can expose some of our own cultural assumptions and enable us to better understand diverse cultures.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31295-31330 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:00PM JGB 2.324
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An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31265-31290 • Rosen, Arlene
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM GSB 2.124
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 304 • Intro Archl Stds: Prehist-Hon

31335 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM SAC 4.174
show description

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.


ANT 305 • Expressive Culture

31340-31355 • Keeler, Ward
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ B0.306
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the concept of culture as a crucial dimension of human life. Because we tend to think of thought and action as stemming from individual impulses, we find the notion of a shared, highly variable, but influential force in our lives hard to fathom.  Even if we speak of "society" as a familiar concept, we tend to make of it a uniform, oppressive force, some institution outside ourselves that we individually confront and oppose. Yet only if we can learn to recognize how deeply we share certain assumptions and inclinations with others--but only some others, and to varying degrees--can we appreciate the degree to which culture inheres within us and makes us who we are.


ANT 307 • Culture And Communication

31360 • Keating, Elizabeth
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JGB 2.216
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The ability to learn and use language is a quintessentially human characteristic—one that distinguishes homo sapiens from other animal species. Language is simultaneously generated through and generative of social life; the former is a primary resource that we humans use in both the structuring and accomplishment of the latter. These dynamics form the subject of study of linguistic anthropology.

This course is an introduction to linguistic anthropology. It is impossible in a single semester to provide a complete overview of all topics that linguistic anthropologists address, so this course covers selected topics, the selection of which is aimed to illustrate how linguistic anthropologists go about doing their work: the range of topics they examine, the kinds of questions they ask, the types of approaches and methods they utilize, and the sorts of conclusions they reach.


ANT 310L • Black Queer Art Worlds

31400 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GWB 1.130
(also listed as AFR 317E, WGS 301)
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Exploration of over two decades of work produced by and about black queer subjects throughout the circum-Atlantic world. Provides an introduction to various artists and intellectuals of the black queer diaspora, as well as an examination of the viability of black queer aesthetic practice as a form of theorizing.


ANT 314C • Intro Mesoamerican Archaeol

31405 • Rodriguez, Enrique
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 4.124
(also listed as LAS 315)
show description

This course is an introduction to ancient Mesoamerica, the area roughly

covering Mexico and the northern half of Central America, from the time of

emerging social inequality in the Formative Period until the Spanish conquest of

Mexico-Tenochtitlan in the sixteenth century. By studying archaeological

evidence from several sites in this region we will address a few important

theoretical issues in archaeology. These issues include: 1) the relationship

between people, the environment, and social organization 2) the study of elites

and commoners in archaeological cultures, and 3) the use of historical and

archaeological data in reconstructing the past. During the course of the

semester we will examine varied lines of evidence, including archaeological

artifacts (especially pottery, obsidian, and ceramic figurines), human remains,

architecture, murals, sculpture, and historical evidence (esp. codices and colonial

accounts) to assess the role of evidence and theory in how we conceptualize the

past in Mesoamerica. In addition, we will address issues that have captured the

general public’s imagination in recent years, including the end of the world, the

Maya collapse, human sacrifice, and others. Thus, the class will be of interest to

archaeology majors and other students as well.


ANT 320L • Ger Lang: Historical Perspec

31425 • Pierce, Marc
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 337
(also listed as C C 348, GER 369, LIN 373)
show description

Course description:

This class provides an overview of language change, language evolution, and sociolinguistics, within the particular context of the history of German. The goal is to enlarge participants’ understanding and appreciation of German and its historical and dialectal development. The course will begin with a discussion of German’s Indo-European origins, and progress from there through Germanic, West Germanic, Old, Middle, and Early New High German to the modern language. The class will also examine examples from a broad range of Germanic languages, social and regional dialects, and pidgins and creoles, with an eye to developing a better understanding of the characteristics, origins and development of language and communication systems.  No prior training in linguistics is required.  The course will be conducted in English.  This course carries a writing flag.

 

Texts/Readings:

-J.C. Salmons, The History of German: What the Past Reveals about Today's Language

[available at the University Co-Op]

-Additional texts will be distributed as necessary and/or made available on Canvas.

You are expected to print out the readings and bring them with you to class for discussion. 

 

 

Grading/Requirements:

Essays:            30%

Term paper:     40%

Quizzes:          15%

Participation:   15%


ANT 320L • Invented Languages

31410 • Handman, Courtney
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM SAC 4.118
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Although invented languages are currently associated with popular science fiction and fantasy genres, people have been inventing languages for at least the past 800 years. These invented languages have been part of religious projects of communicating with god(s), political projects of universal peace, or scientific projects of creating the language of truth. We will look at the different ways that linguists, hobbyists, or philosophers have understood language as “natural” rather than “man-made” phenomenon and how these debates have had effects on projects of linguistic planning, reform, or invention. In this class we will pay particular attention to the 19th and 20th centuries because this is when European colonialism altered and exacerbated questions of univeralisms, human communication, and radical social change that became central to projects of language invention. Topics will include: medieval Christian invented languages, Enlightenment projects of language reform, pidgin and creole languages, colonial linguistics, the International Auxiliary Language movement that advocated for global use of languages like Esperanto or Basic English, and contemporary “conlangs” associated with various science fiction and fantasy series. 


ANT 320L • Polit/Polity/Power Of Words

31415 • Slotta, James
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM SAC 4.118
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Politicians are often decried as being “all talk and no action,” a criticism that draws on a familiar view of language that contrasts “real” actions—the proper concern of politics—with “mere” words. And yet, “real” political actions, from the founding of nation-states (“We the People…”) to the transformation of polities (“I have a dream…”), rest on the power of “mere” words. In this course, we look at the place of language in a variety of different political settings—from oblique oratory in small-scale egalitarian communities to ritual “poetry” in cosmic polities to procedural prose in mass bureaucratic states—to come to a better understanding of the power of words. Working with a broad understanding of politics, we look at the varied ways language sustains and transforms power relations in different political contexts, and thereby takes on a power of its own. In the process, we explore a variety of political situations, different modes of political communication, as well as different theories of the “performative” power of words.


ANT 320L • Speech Play And Verbal Art

31420 • Webster, Anthony
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118
(also listed as LIN 373)
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This class takes an ethnographic and linguistic approach to the twin and twined concerns of speech play and verbal art. Ultimately, speech play and verbal art are social practices that are deeply embedded within and creative of linguistic structurings (call this grammar, if you like). After orienting students to the basic ideas of play, grammar, performance, and context; this class proceeds to look at a variety of examples of speech play and verbal art (from puns to lies to songs to stories to poetry) in a host of contexts and languages. Rather than being seen as a marginal pursuit, speech play and verbal art are revealed to be central features of the language, culture and individual nexus and thus essential to both ethnography (anthropology) and linguistics. Along the way, we may also find delight and wisdom in such examples of speech play and verbal art. 


ANT 322M • Mexican Amer Indig Heritage

31430 • Menchaca, Martha
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L, MAS 374)
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This course examines the cultural prehistory and racial history of Mexican Americans from 1519 to the present. The purpose of the course is to examine how policies and laws enacted by the governments of Spain, Mexico, and the U.S. impacted the ethnic and racial identities of Mexican Americans. The geographic focus of the course is Mexico and the United States Southwest. 


ANT 324L • Art & Archaeol Of Ancient Peru

31440 • Runggaldier, Astrid
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM DFA 2.204
(also listed as ARH 347K, LAS 327)
show description

The growth of civilization in South America from the earliest decorated textiles, pottery, and ceremonial buildings to the imperial Inca style


ANT 324L • Biomedicine, Ethics, & Cul

31450 • Traphagan, John
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM WCH 1.120
(also listed as ANS 361, R S 373M)
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Health-care professionals, bio-medical researchers, patients, and families in all societies are increasingly faced with ethical issues that arise because of new medical technologies and because of alternative approaches to health and illness. This course focuses on ethical questions such as allocation of medical resources, stem cell research and cloning, organ transplantation, abortion, human experimentation, prolonging life and the right to die, suicide, euthanasia, and the diagnosis and treatment of illnesses such as Alzheimer disease, AIDS, and mental disorders.

This course explores these topics from a global perspective, emphasizing how cultural values and ethical systems define moral issues and inform decision-making about medical care. We will consider ethical theories that have been used in the West to consider medical practice, and compare these with approaches in non-Western cultures such as Japan and India. The course emphasizes the use of case studies to explore issues in medical ethics and to develop the ability to apply ethical theories in ways sensitive to variations in cultural values. 

Students in this course engage in discussion and debate about difficult moral issues and it is likely that members of the class will have different, and sometimes profoundly conflicting, ideas about what is right and wrong. You should feel free to express and support your position; this is an important component of the class. 

 


ANT 324L • Contemp African Pop Culture

31455 • Livermon, Xavier
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A207A
(also listed as AFR 372G, WGS 340)
show description

The aim of this course is to introduce students to some of the most significant aspects of popular culture in contemporary sub-Saharan Africa. Manifestations of popular culture are considered as markers of modern African identities, embedded in complex and varied socio-cultural, historical and political contexts. Within the current era of global, diasporic, and transnational flows, it is neither sufficient any longer to view Africa solely from the perspective of political economies, nor to discuss contemporary African culture within the tradition-versus-modernity debate. Manifestations of popular culture in Africa show that the continent is part and parcel of the postmodern world, with cultural production simultaneously influenced by global trends and specific African contexts. The course will cover various forms of cultural expression and genres, including popular film, music, literature, dance, comics and cartoons, fashion, sport, street art, theatre, and contemporary visual arts. Attention will be paid to the production modes, audiences and sites of consumption of these different genres and aspects of popular culture. Course instruction will include extensive film and clip viewings, analysis of music, and reading fictional texts such as popular novels and comics.

Texts:

  • Marguerite Abouet Aya: Life in Yop City.
  • Nadine Dolby: Constructing Race: Youth, Identity and Popular Culture in South Africa.
  • Manthia Diawara In Search of Africa.
  • Sokari Ekine ed. SMS Uprising: Mobile Activism in Africa. 
  • Relebohile Moletsane, Claudia Mitchell, and Ann Smith eds. Was it Something I Wore? Dress, Identity, Materialitiy.
  • Mwenda Ntarangwi East African Hip-Hop: Youth Culture and Globalization.
  • Simon Weller and Garth Walker South African Township Barbershops and Salons.

Grading breakdown (percentages):

  • Attendance and Participation 20%
  • Response Papers 20%
  • Midterm 20%
  • Final 40%

ANT 324L • Ethnogrphic Theory/Practice

31475 • Sturm, Circe
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 323
show description

This course explores the complex relationship between anthropological ideas and ethnographic practice. The goals of the course are two-fold: (1) to introduce a broad spectrum of concepts, issues, and theories of culture, and (2) to critically examine how these theories and ideas shape anthropological methods and writings. To do this, we will read and critique five ethnographies on five different cultures, each with vastly different approaches to their respective subjects. In teaching, I use a combination of lecture and discussion, interspersed with various classroom exercises, films and creative writing assignments. We begin the semester by asking, “what is ethnography?” and “what is theory?” Eventually we address more complicated issues such as how the construction of an ethnographic subject is shaped by pre-existing or dominant ideas about culture and how scholarly, political and personal agendas shape research projects, fieldwork strategies and ethnographic texts. We conclude the course by assessing where the study of culture is today, and by writing our own brief, creative ethnographies.

Requirements

Because the course relies upon a blend of lecture and discussion, reading in advance is required. Students should arrive with questions and ideas, and be prepared to discuss readings in class. Students are also required to keep up with the key points presented in each class. If you are having difficulty with any of the ideas presented in class, then it is your responsibility to meet with other students or to attend my office hours to clarify course materials. Please use these opportunities to your advantage! The course also fulfills part of the writing requirements for the School of Undergraduate Studies at UT. Therefore, the course is writing-intensive and will require keeping up with writing assignments throughout the semester. 


ANT 324L • Gis/Rem Sns Archaeol/Paleo

31470 • Reed, Denne
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM CLA 1.404
(also listed as GRG 356T)
show description

Overview: This course surveys archeological and paleontological applications of GIS and remote sensing data such as digital maps, aerial photography and satellite imagery for use in locating field sites, planning field logistics and conducting landscape analysis.

The GIS component of the course builds on the remote sensing component and adds to it the analysis of map fea- tures stored in databases. The course introduces databases theory and practice, and moves through the various stages of GIS workflow: the planning and design of GIS projects, building geospatial datasets, various methods of geospa- tial analysis and a short introduction to map layouts and reports. The remote sensing component of the course covers remote sensing data acquisition, image georectification, image processing and classification.

The course covers GIS and remote sensing from an applied perspective and students are expected to invest lab time in completing tutorials on GIS and RS methods as well as applying these methods to individual projects.

Prerequisites and Expectations: The course is designed to compliment ANT 324L Digital Data Systems in Archeology, which has a greater emphasis on data acquisition and field methods. This is NOT an introductory course in GIS and remote sensing. This is an accelerated course is GIS and RS fundamentals. There are no en- forced prerequisites, but students should have a comfortable working knowledge of computers and an introductory GIS or remote sensing course is recommended but not required. 


ANT 324L • Graf/Pstr Art: Islam World

31485 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A218A
(also listed as ISL 373, MEL 321, MES 342, R S 358, WGS 340)
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Too many portrayals of Islamic societies are treated as superficially as the issues involving the hijab and veiling. Among the hip and the fashionable, the religious fronts and political systems in contemporary Muslim societies (particularly in the Middle East and North Africa), a complex and complicated phenomenon has been developing for decades:  the “art of the wall,” namely, graffiti and poster art.

Poster art and graffiti are employed by various groups within the Islamic world to project their ideas through the mediums of photography, video, the film of documentary makers, the paint and ink of professionals, anonymous or amateur designers and artists to record the political and social events within urban areas. Such visual records depicting aspects of everyday life give voice to the people living and working within the Muslim world. An observer can see acts of rebellion as the anonymous young population in Muslim societies experiments with ways to test the limits of freedom. This is done with creativity and often with courage, which may cause concern to the political systems ruling over people whose freedom of speech and action are limited.

In this course, the students are introduced to a common and general principle of Islam, followed by a study of differences in culture and linguistic background of the people in lands of a Muslim majority. The major part of the semester is devoted to analysis and studying graffiti and poster art as it relates to social and political events unfolding. It is expected that the students become interested and learn that the interpretation of today’s Muslim youth through popular culture, expressed in the art and work of talented people manifesting their identities and personal expression about the world around them, provides a valuable access to learning and getting closer to the cultures that may seem strange, illogical, or somewhat hostile to the principles of “Western democracy.” This is an opportunity for us to look at the body and soul of people of ancient civilizations and of a recent troubled history with high hopes for a bright future from the perspective of those from the inside looking out.

 


ANT 324L • Muslim Women In Politics

31460 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A303A
(also listed as ISL 372, R S 358, WGS 340)
show description

There has been a religious resurgence since the 1970s, and Islam has come to play a significant role in the world. Despite the restrictions placed on women by the religious authorities, the most unexpected effect of this religious renaissance is the overwhelming political participation of many Muslim women at different levels in their respective cultures. While a large number of Muslim women are winning elections in many countries, in general, women’s rights are still an issue in the Muslim world. Since the beginning of recorded Islamic history, Muslim women with political influence have held political offices and positions of leadership. At the same time, we know that in some Muslim nations the rights of women are limited, and their participation as public servants is almost impossible. In both of these cases, Islam is given as the key rationale for participation or lack of participation of women in their society. Both Quranic and hadith commentators vary as to whether women’s political participation is a correct interpretation of religious imperatives.

 

Debate about the religious legitimacy of Muslim women and their participation in politics are the themes of this course. We will study and discuss the historical developments and debates about both religious and cultural perspectives that affect the role of Muslim women in politics. We will study important Muslim women who have held or hold important political positions or influential positions in NGOs or as political activists and grassroot leaders. In addition, we also will study issues on gender, ethnicity, culture, and faith that impact Muslim women’s political participation and how Muslim women constitute themselves as social and political actors as a result of their interactions within the structural frameworks and political cultures. 


ANT 324L • Urban Unrest

31480 • Tang, Eric
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 203
(also listed as AAS 330, AFR 372F, AMS 321, URB 354)
show description

How and when do cities burn? The modern US city has seen its share of urban unrest, typified by street protests (both organized and spontaneous), the destruction of private property, looting, and fires. Interpretations of urban unrest are varied: some describe it as aimless rioting, others as political insurrection. Most agree that the matter has something to do with the deepening of racism, poverty and violence. This course takes a closer look at the roots of urban unrest, exploring a range of origins: joblessness, state violence, white flight, the backlash against civil rights gains, new immigration and interracial strife. Urban unrest is often cast as an intractable struggle between black and white, yet this course examines the ways in which multiple racial groups have entered the fray. Beyond race and class, the course will also explore unrest as a mode of pushing the normative boundaries of gender and sexuality in public space. Course material will draw from film, literature, history, geography and anthropology.

 

Required Texts: 

  • The majority of readings will be available as pdf on Blackboard. Students must acquire the following texts:
  • Robert F. Williams, Negroes With Guns
  • Robin D.G. Kelley, Yo Mama’s Dysfunctional: Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America
  • Dan Georgakis and Marvin Surkin, Detroit: I Do Mind Dying: A Study in Urban Revolution
  • Robert Gooding Williams eds. Reading Rodney King/Reading Urban Uprising

ANT 325L • Amer Jewish Material Cul

31510 • Seriff, Suzanne
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.106
(also listed as J S 365, R S 346)
show description

This course introduces students to a burgeoning field of American Jewish cultural studies that deals with what cultural theorist Arjun Appadurai calls, “the social value of things.” Focusing on the interplay between material culture and Jewish identity, thought, and practice in contemporary America, the course explores how Jews think about, work with, use, wear, display and “perform” objects in the course of their everyday lives, and in public arts, history and cultural institutions. This is not a course just on the production of fine art by or about Jews, so much as it is about the everyday arts of adornment, celebration, liturgy, spirituality, memorialization and identity and the ways in which these various meanings are negotiated within distinct domains of prayer, performance, entertainment and display.

Borrowing from the central concern of cultural commentator, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, we will pose the question, "What does it mean to show?"— or in this case, “to show, Jewishly?” -- and explore the agency of display in a variety of American Jewish settings: in the home, on the street, in houses of worship, on the body, in celebration and in public displays such as museum exhibits, world’s fairs, festivals, and other heritage and tourist attractions. We will look at how the everyday artifacts of American Jewish life are made to "perform" their meanings for us by the very fact of being consumed, collected, arranged, worn, addressed, touched, kissed, and carried, and about the powerful messages 

conveyed not only by the objects themselves but by the specific ways in which these objects are addressed and interacted with. In examining the meaning and value of things in the context of religious practice and cultural display, students will have a chance to explore broader theoretical topics about what it means to be Jewish in a multi-cultural, multi-national, multi-denominational democracy such as the United States, as seen through an exploration of issues of memory, sense of place, identity, performativity, belief, and spirituality. Drawing from the fields of folklore, Jewish studies, cultural studies, religious studies, literature, museum studies, film, and photography, the course introduces students to the vibrancy and meanings of Jewish material culture in American Jewish life and thought.

The course will emphasize the development of critical thinking skills and cultural analysis. The class format will entail active, participatory, and empowering ways of learning based on class discussion, class field trips, and original oral historical and fieldwork-based research. The course is intentionally designed to be student-centered. Students will be discussing and presenting material during class sessions and interacting with one another and the instructor on a regular basis. Students will also have the opportunity to participate directly in the curatorial process of cultural representation, either through the planning and/or implementation of their own exhibit, or a critical analysis of a particular display of objects owned, made, collected, worn, displayed, used, venerated, and symbolized in American Jewish culture. 


ANT 325L • Ethnographies Of Emotion

31515 • Stewart, Kathleen
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.118
show description

This course will explore the ways in which shared emotions and sensibilities animate

social and cultural life. We will read works trying to describe this process. Ethnography

means writing difference. Here we stretch that concept, along with many anthropologists,

to treat ethnography as a description of the specificity of any shared or recognizable form

of life, practice, sensibility, or feeling. Difference is pervasive and generative even in

what, in one model, appears to be “the same” “culture”, group, or genre. By writing

culture, we are learning to describe the precision of how a whole range of things impact

lives. In doing this, and in looking for models of this, we will also stretch our attention far

beyond the confines of ethnographies written by anthropologists into mixed-genre works

of creative nonfiction and memoir.

This is a very hands-on writing workshop. Students will keep daily free-writing journals,

write and read aloud in class weekly ethnographies of feeling inspired by the readings,

and compile a longer essay from the short, working through drafts. I will provide

exercises and workshops on needed tools including on ethnography, autoethnography,

voice, and the description of objects, places, scenes, situations, characters, and

sensibilities from the point of view of their emotions, moods, structures of feeling, and

atmospheres. There will also be work an editing.


ANT 325L • Jewish Folklore

31500 • Gottesman, Itzik
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GDC 5.304
(also listed as GSD 360, J S 363, R S 357, REE 325)
show description

Course Description

Dybbuks, golems, evil eye are just some of the more well-known aspects of Jewish folklore, but this course will also examine the folklife of the Jews, their world view, their folk beliefs and fears. Call it folk religion if you will; many of these practices were dismissed by the "offical" Jewish religion as unJewish, but the "folk" persisted and eventually the practice became Judaized and accepted. The influence of the Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism, also led to the introduction of many customs.

Using literary sources, ethnographic memoirs, historical documents, films (among them "The Dybbuk" 1939), folkore collections and field trips (among them - to the oldest Austin Jewish cemetery), we will focus on what makes Jewish folklore Jewish. For example, the high literacy rate among Jews over the centuries and the people's close connection to the written word led to the development of specifically Jewish interpretations of internationally disseminated beliefs. Folklore genres -folktale, legend, folksong, folkmusic, custom, belief and, of course, Jewish humor will be included.

 

Grading Policy

  • Attendance, homework and class participation: 30%
  • Four short papers 30%
  • Midterm and final paper: 40%

 

Reading List

  • Joshua Trachternberg   Jewish Magic and Superstition
  • Joachim Neugroschel   Great Tales of Jewish Fantasy and the Occult
  • Moses Gaster    Maaseh Book
  • I. B. Singer    The Satan in Goray
  • Elizabeth Herzog/Mark Zborowski   Life is With People

ANT 325L • Practices Of Looking

31508 • Campbell, Craig
Meets MW 2:30PM-4:00PM SAC 4.118
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Students in this class will develop skills associated with the critique and use of different forms of digital and analogue media. They will develop sensibilities for the examination of vision as a cultural practice. Participants will develop methodological and analytical tools associated with Visual Anthropology. This course will explore the history of the visual in anthropology as seen in the production of photographs, films, and videos. We will explore themes of media, mediation, everyday life, “the gaze,” documentary forms, materiality, technology, realism and representation, as well as ethics. This course will introduce participants to critical approaches and analytic methods that broaden their toolkit for describing the world and the ways in which it is culturally and historically mediated. This course is ideally taken prior to “The Photographic Image: Visual Anthropology II.”


ANT 326L • Cultures In Contact

31520 • Covey, Ronald
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as LAS 324L)
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History of the interactions of the indigenous peoples of the Americas with Africans, Asians, and Europeans over the past five hundred years.


ANT 330C • Theories Of Culture & Society

31525 • Cons, Jason
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.118
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The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the most important theoretical contributions made to the study of culture and society since the nineteenth century. The first half of the course is devoted largely to reading the great systems builders of the social sciences: Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Freud. All of their ideas have been under attack for decades, but their thinking still pervades the social sciences and must be reckoned with. We then turn to figures influential primarily in the history of anthropology, and finally, to recent and contemporary writers in the social sciences whose ideas fuel ongoing debates in anthropology today. The course is conceived primarily for majors but above all for students who are committed to working with difficult, influential, and fascinating texts.

The course combines both lecture, on Thursdays, and seminar discussion, on Tuesdays. Seminar discussion will be based in most cases on short written assignments submitted before class. Attending lectures and seminar discussion is required, and absences must be explained.

The course integrates an intense and demanding regime of reading and discussion with an equally intense and demanding program of writing. In order to assist students with their writing, a portion of every Tuesday class will be devoted to discussing writing. The aim is to encourage students to develop the habit of writing clear and concise prose, organized in such a way that a reader is aware of the overall structure of each sentence, paragraph, and essay.

Note that this course satisfies the criteria of a "Writing Flag" course. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. 


ANT 346L • Primate Social Behavior

31535 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SAC 5.172
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This course focuses on the study of primate social behavior. It explores the basic theoretical principles that guide primatologists.

Topics covered include: evolutionary theory, primate diversity, social and mating systems, sexual selection, life history, cooperation, competition, intelligence, communication, and human behavior.


ANT 346M • Comparative Primate Ecology

31540 • Lewis, Rebecca
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM SAC 5.172
show description

Comparative Primate Ecology will explore the following topics with respect to primates: population ecology, community ecology, feeding adaptations, foraging strategies, ranging behavior, and life history strategies.


ANT 350C • Primate Sensory Ecology

31545 • Kirk, Edward
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SAC 5.172
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Primate Sensory Ecology is a course designed for advanced undergraduates in physical anthropology and the biological sciences. This course provides an opportunity for detailed study of primate sensory systems from an ecological and comparative phylogenetic perspective.
    The core topics covered in this course are the special senses of hearing, vision, and smell, with a special emphasis on the adaptive and ecological significance of sensory adaptations in primates. For each of these senses, lectures and readings will provide a comprehensive review of the following concepts: 1) general anatomy and physiology, 2) development and genetic regulation, 3) functional morphology and mechanics, 4) neural control and regulation, 5) psychophysics, 6) biological role and behavioral ecology, 7) phylogenetic history and fossil record. Additional senses that will be covered in a less-comprehensive fashion include touch, taste, balance and equilibrium, and the Jacobson's organ.
In studying each sensory system, a strong emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between variant morphologies and behavioral capabilities. This dual focus on morphology and behavioral ecology will provide students with an explicit understanding of the effect that the  functional design of a sensory system has on an organism's adaptive niche. All information will be presented within a comparative phylogenetic framework, so that evolutionary novelties (e.g., the haplorhine retinal fovea) can be understood in terms of the macroevolutionary processes responsible for the novel feature's appearance. This approach will further emphasize the importance of certain evolutionary changes in primate sensory systems as key innovations. Toward this end, discussions of current literature will cover a number of special topics in addition to the more basic aspects of sensory system morphology and function.


ANT 353E • Archaeological Lab Analysis

31555 • Franklin, Maria
Meets TTH 11:00AM-1:30PM SAC 4.174
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This is a lab-based course where students will work directly with artifacts recovered from a historic site in central Texas. The assemblage largely consists of a wide spectrum of household-related artifacts including ceramics, container glass, decorative objects, personal effects, and so on. The general goal is to train students in basic archaeological lab methods, technical report writing, and preliminary artifact analysis. These are foundational skill sets applicable to all practices of archaeology.

 

Individuals who are interested in material culture studies and archaeology may find this course of interest and useful to pursuing further study in these related fields. Students who are looking for opportunities to learn a subject through a more active, “hands on” approach where working independently is encouraged may also find this course a good fit. Students will discover that the course will test – and help them to develop – their organizational skills, attention to detail, competence in problem solving, and their ability to describe, categorize, and synthesize data.

 

Course Objectives:

 

By the end of the semester, students should be able to demonstrate…:

 

[if !supportLists]-                      [endif]…proficiency in identification and dating of historic artifacts from circa 1900 to the 1960s. Students should have the ability to distinguish between major artifact categories, identify common diagnostic traits, and know which sources to seek out in order to accurately identify and date various artifact types. 

[if !supportLists]-                      [endif]…the proper procedures for cataloging artifacts for curation by filling out lab forms and labels accurately, and entering data into Excel.

[if !supportLists]-                      [endif]…how to employ Excel to create artifact tables and graphics.

[if !supportLists]-                      [endif]…the process for synthesizing archaeological data to conduct a preliminary descriptive analysis of historic artifacts.

[if !supportLists]-                      [endif]…basic skills in technical report writing in archaeology.

 


ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

31560 • Kappelman, John
Meets TTH 12:30PM-1:00PM SAC 5.172
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This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.


ANT 366 • Anat/Bio Human Skeleton-Wb

31565 • Kappelman, John
show description

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. 

Taught online with established deadlines. Online activities and exams may be scheduled. Go to http://www.laits.utexas.edu/tower/online/courses/ for additional information and to test your computer and internet connectivity.


ANT 432L • Primate Anatomy

31530 • Shapiro, Liza
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.174
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An exploration of the relationship between primate anatomical form and function, with emphasis on adaptations to diet and locomotion.  The course is also designed to demonstrate how such information can be applied to the fossil record in order to reconstruct the evolutionary development of primate adaptations.

There is a two hour lab section associated with this class.


ANT 453 • Archaeological Analysis

31550 • Valdez, Fred
Meets MW 10:00AM-12:00PM SAC 4.174
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The purpose of this course to provide you (the course participants) with a background to “the kinds” of archaeological analyses that often occur, “what” is involved in archaeological analysis, and “how” archaeological analysis may be approached. This means learning what questions to ask about a field or laboratory project and the steps needed to understand the type of analysis required. From this course you should also become aware of “how to do” an analysis from start (first learning about certain material culture) to completion (doing the analysis and the report writing).

 

 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.