Department of Anthropology

Claud A. Bramblett


Professor EmeritusPh.D., Berkeley

Claud A. Bramblett

Contact

Interests


Physical anthropology, primatology; East Africa

Biography


CV

Research interests:
1. Continued study of the behavioral biology of Guenons and baboons in
captivity
2. Linear models for behavior changes and social structure in
Cercopithecus and
Papio.
3. CAI software development for Physical
Anthropology
4. Heritability of behavior in Guenons and baboons
5.
Socioecology of Cebus, Ateles, Saimiri, and Alouatta

Courses taught: Undergraduate Courses: ANT 301. Introduction to Physical Anthropology; ANT 301
Introduction to Physical Anthropology. Distance Education Center; ANT 323K.
Primate Behavior; ANT 350M. Evolution of Human Behavior; ANT 359H. Honors
Seminar; ANT 366. Anatomy and Biology of the Human Skeleton

Graduate Courses:
ANT 388. Topics in Physical Anthropology
ANT 391L. Topics in Research Methods in Physical Anthropology: Topic 3: Analysis
of Skeletal Samples; Topic 4: Field Methods in Primatology; Topic 5: Analysis of
Primate Behavior
ANT 392L. Introduction to Graduate Physical Anthropology.Core course.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Courses


ANT F301 • Physical Anthropology

82120 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM ESB 223

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

26260 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM EPS 2.102

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

ANT 392L • Intro To Grad Physical Anthro

26880 • Fall 2002
Meets M 12:00PM-3:00PM EPS 2.102

Content and Scope:  Why are humans unique in so many features; in having culture and language; in being bipedal; in the way we gather our food, and its extraordinary range; in our social and sexual behavior and its variability?  This course examines patterns of anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates and humans, and the evidence for human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  A wide range of evidence from the natural and social sciences is presented to understand present and past anatomical and behavioral adaptations, and to view humans and our ancestors as members of diverse animal and plant communities.  Our goal is to understand the place of humans in the world.

ANT S301 • Physical Anthropology

82370 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM GAR 1

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 301 • Physical Anthropology

26145-26195 • Spring 2002
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM GEO 100

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of biological anthropology, the study of human beings from a biological perspective.  It is a field that seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words: Who are we? How are we unique? How, why, and when did we come to be the way that we are? The study of biological anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among the living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of evolution, and trace the path of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

26530 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 8:00AM-10:00AM EPS 2.102

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

ANT 392L • Intro To Grad Physical Anthro

27355 • Fall 2001
Meets M 12:00PM-3:00PM EPS 2.102

Content and Scope:  Why are humans unique in so many features; in having culture and language; in being bipedal; in the way we gather our food, and its extraordinary range; in our social and sexual behavior and its variability?  This course examines patterns of anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates and humans, and the evidence for human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  A wide range of evidence from the natural and social sciences is presented to understand present and past anatomical and behavioral adaptations, and to view humans and our ancestors as members of diverse animal and plant communities.  Our goal is to understand the place of humans in the world.

ANT S301 • Physical Anthropology

82005 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM GAR 1

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

26855 • Spring 2001
Meets M 9:00AM-10:00AM EPS 2.102

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

ANT 392L • Intro To Grad Physical Anthro

27470 • Fall 2000
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM EPS 2.102

Content and Scope:  Why are humans unique in so many features; in having culture and language; in being bipedal; in the way we gather our food, and its extraordinary range; in our social and sexual behavior and its variability?  This course examines patterns of anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates and humans, and the evidence for human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  A wide range of evidence from the natural and social sciences is presented to understand present and past anatomical and behavioral adaptations, and to view humans and our ancestors as members of diverse animal and plant communities.  Our goal is to understand the place of humans in the world.

ANT S301 • Physical Anthropology

82165 • Summer 2000
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM FAC 21

This course is an introduction to the principles and the methods of physical anthropology.  Physical anthropology is the study of human beings in a biological context, and seeks to explain our relationship to other primates and to the rest of the natural world.  In other words, who are we? how are we unique? how, why, an when did we come to be the way we are?The study of physical anthropology requires many different types of knowledge.  Throughout the course, we will examine anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates, learn the basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process, and trace a pathway of human evolution as reconstructed from the fossil record.  The main goal of the course is to obtain a clear understanding of our place in nature.

ANT 366 • Anat And Bio Of Human Skeleton

26420 • Spring 2000
Meets M 9:00AM-10:00AM EPS 2.102

This course introduces the student to an in-depth study of the human skeleton. Class sessions combine lecture and laboratory sessions and cover topics including developmental biology, functional morphology, and skeletal identification, with a special focus on the latter skill as it relates to forensics and archaeological studies. Students will also be introduced to new 3D imaging techniques for studying the skeleton. 

This class requires both intensive in-class and out-of-class preparation. Participants must be prepared to handle actual human osteological specimens and have a professional approach to this subject and the human remains. An interest in human skeletal identification is especially applicable to the fields of archeology, physical anthropology, health sciences, law, and law enforcement.

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