Department of Anthropology

R. Alan Covey


Associate ProfessorPh.D., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

R. Alan Covey

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-2084
  • Office: CLA 4.406
  • Office Hours: Spring 2016: Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:00 a.m.-9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.-Noon
  • Campus Mail Code: C3200

Interests


Archaeology, ethnohistory, Andes, Inca empire, early Colonial Peru, archaeological theory

Courses


ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31065-31090 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM ART 1.102

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 324L • Inca World

30360 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM SAC 4.118
(also listed as LAS 324L)

When Francisco Pizarro and led an expeditionary force into the Andean highlands in 1532, the Incas ruled the largest native empire to develop anywhere in the Americas.  The Incas governed millions of subjects living across one of the most diverse regions of the planet, and they left behind impressive material remains that speak to their organizational and technological abilities.  This course will explore how Inca civilization developed, how the Incas grew from a small highland state into a mighty empire, and how a small number of Spaniards and their allies were able to bring the Inca dynasty to an end.  We will read accounts of the Incas written in the first years of Spanish colonial rule, and will also review the latest archaeological discoveries.

ANT 324L • Who Owns The Past

30385 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM SAC 4.174

 The roots of scientific archaeology lie in antiquarianism and colonial empire.  Elite collectors assembled ancient artifacts, for aesthetic reasons or to assert links with the past, and museums developed to fulfill such functions in the public interest in emerging nation-states.  This course will discuss the complex and often contentious ways that these legacies influence contemporary archaeology, museum practices, and international heritage management.  The central question—who owns the past?—will be explored in both an intellectual sense and an economic one.  We will discuss cooperation and conflict among archaeologists and descendant communities, issues of repatriation, and laws and policies that determine the treatment of artifacts as commodities.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

30385-30410 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-10:30AM GSB 2.124

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

ANT 380K • Origins Of Inequality

30639 • Fall 2015
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.124

The Western historical and philosophical tradition perpetuates stories of how and

why people became unequal in different senses. With the possible exception of legal inequality,

the creation of unequal social arrangements occurred before the invention of writing, making it a

fundamental question for archaeology, but raising the question of how independently

archaeologists approach some important social questions that remain significant today. In this

class, we will take a critical look at how anthropological archaeology has approached inequality,

and how researchers represent the origins of different kinds of inequality in the recent

professional literature. After discussing different aspects of inequality and their material

implications, students will lead class discussions of case studies of inequality from areas of their

own professional interest.

ANT 380K • Inca Soc Before/After Euro Inv

30770 • Spring 2015
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM SAC 5.118

This course will provide a broad introduction to the world of the Incas—the largest native empire to form in the Western hemisphere.  We will approach the Incas from several different scales that reflect the different disciplines that comprise Inca studies, beginning with Andean ecology, and then turning to archaeology and art history.  We will read Inca ethnohistory as part of a discussion of the continuity of Inca social practices following the European invasion.  Depending on student interest, we may also consider the Inca legacy in Andean ethnography and contemporary political and ethnic representation.

ANT 304 • Intro Archaeol Stds: Prehist

31315-31330 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.134

An introduction to archaeology as a discipline.  Three major themes that deal with issues of the past will be covered:

1.  A brief history of the discipline, changing theories about various aspects of the past, and the role that the reconstructions of the past play in national and/or group identities.

2.  A survey of the development of human culture from its beginnings to the rise of civilizations and proto-historical cultures in most areas of the world.  Prehistoric cultures, archaeological sites, and areas of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe , and the Pacific will be covered.

3.  Archaeological methods of recovery of information about the past.  Scientific procedures involved in excavation, dating, and preservation of the material record.

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