Department of Classics

Theorizing Consent: Educational and Legal Perspectives on Campus Rape

Theorizing Consent:

Educational and Legal Perspectives on Campus Rape

Friday, April 29 & Saturday, April 30

All Conference Sessions take place in Flawn Academic Center 21

The conference is co-sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts, Plan II, Liberal Arts Honors, the Department of Classics, the James R. Dougherty, Jr. Centennial Professorship, the William A. Percy Foundation for Social and Historical Studies, and numerous individual donors, including Ms. Nina Giannangeli. Please contact Prof. Thomas Hubbard (tkh@utexas.edu) or Khoa Tran (khoabtran@austin.utexas.edu) if you have questions.

Videos of the conference speakers: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKwuHA9F5Njw5-x5QQ1wCZg

Media coverage of the conference:

UT's conference on campus rape begins Friday [VIDEO]
KVUE Channel 7 TV News--ABC | Apr. 29, 2016 10:49 PM CDT
http://www.kvue.com/news/local/uts-conference-on-campus-rape-begins-friday/159714950

UT conference debates issue of campus rape [VIDEO]
KEYE Channel 43 TV News--CBS | Apr. 29, 2016 | Lindsay Liepman
http://keyetv.com/news/local/ut-conference-debates-controversial-issue-of-campus-rape
 
Conference at UT looks to open a dialogue on rape, sexual consent
KEYE Channel 43 TV News--CBS | Apr. 29, 2016 | Adam Hammons
http://keyetv.com/news/local/conference-at-ut-looks-to-open-a-dialogue-on-rape-sexual-consent

'Theorizing Consent': UT Hosts Conference On Campus Sexual Assaults [VIDEO]
Time Warner Cable News | Apr. 30, 2016 12:14 PM CDT
http://www.twcnews.com/tx/austin/news/2016/04/30/-theorizing-consent---ut-hosts-conference-on-campus-sexual-assaults-.html

UT conference debates occurrence of sexual assault on campus [VIDEO]
Channel 7 TV News--Fox | Apr. 30, 2016 7:35PM CDT | Jennifer Kendall
http://www.fox7austin.com/news/local-news/135296241-story

Summary Schedule of Conference Presentations

Friday, April 29

6:30-6:45 PM        Welcome and Introduction (Prof. Thomas K. Hubbard)

6:45-8:00 PM        Keynote Address

Laura Kipnis (Film Studies, Northwestern University), "Stupid Sex/Higher Education"

8:00 PM       Reception (and Dinner for Conference Badge Holders) – FAC Patio

Saturday, April 30

9:30-11:00 AM     Session One: The Current State of Title IX Law 

Laura L. Dunn (Law, University of Maryland; SurvJustice) “Campus Sexual Assault as an Institutional Balancing Act: Procedural Requirements under VAWA"

Nancy Cantalupo (Law, Barry University), “For the Title IX Civil Rights Movement: Congratulations and Cautions”

11:00-11:15 AM  Coffee Break

11:15 AM – 1:30 PM      Session Two: Affirmative Consent and Its Complications

Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (Law, University of Virginia), “Consent and Culpability”

Joseph Cohn (Foundation for Individual Rights in Education), “Why We Should Say 'No' to 'Yes Means Yes'”

 

Chandra Kavanagh (Philosophy, McMaster University), “Who Can Make a Yes?: Disability, Sexual Consent, and ‘Yes Means Yes’”

1:30-2:30 PM        Lunch Break

2:30-4:00 PM        Session Three: Social Science Perspectives

Callie Rennison (Public Policy, University of Colorado Denver), “Toward a Better Understanding of Estimates of Sexual Violence against College Students”

Deborah Davis (Psychology, University of Nevada, Reno), “Pathways to Honest False Testimony in Cases of Disputed Sexual Consent: The Roles of Alcohol, Sexual Scripts, and Indirect Sexual Communication”

4:00-5:30 PM Session Four: Educating about Rape

Maria-Belén Ordóñez (Sociology, Ontario College of Art and Design University), “Circuits of Power and Desire: The case of Dominique Strauss-Khan and Critical Pedagogies of Consent” 

Kathy L. Gaca (Classics and Divinity, Vanderbilt University), “The Paradox of College Rape Culture from an Ancient Mediterranean Perspective”

5:30-5:45 PM        Coffee Break

5:45-7:00 PM        Session Five: Addressing Campus Rape in Texas

LaToya Hill Smith (Associate Vice President and Title IX Coordinator, University Compliance Services, University of Texas, Austin)

Erin Burrows (Coordinator, Voices Against Violence, University of Texas, Austin)

Ted Rutherford (Communications Director, Texas Association Against Sexual Assault)

Abstracts and Biographies of Conference Presenters

Friday, April 29

6:30-6:45 PM        Welcome and Introduction (Prof. Thomas K. Hubbard)

6:45-8:00 PM        Keynote Address

Laura Kipnis (Film Studies, Northwestern University), "Stupid Sex/Higher Education"

The big story on campus is that sex is dangerous again. For previous generations, slogans like "pleasure" and "liberation" were the ones that got tossed around a lot, whereas campus narratives of the moment are all about sexual assault and other encroachments. Whether or not students are having sex that differently, shifting the narrative from pleasure to danger changes the way sex is experienced. Other people's sexuality becomes encroaching; a risqué remark or the wrong eye contact feels like an assault. A professor can be accused of creating "a hostile environment" by writing an essay. What or who gains by the new story? 1) Carceral versions of feminism, which have trumped over emancipatory one. 2) Campus administrators, who expand their fiefdoms the more territory and bodies they can find to regulate (Title IX compliance being among the reasons for the bloat). 3) A neoliberal political agenda, especially to the extent that the sexual endangerment story invites a crime-control focus as opposed to an educational one. The increased sense of fragility on the part of students demands new regulations, swelling the ranks of potential offenders: students and professors both. Yes there's a vast amount of messy, stupid sex on campus (drunken, ambivalent, pressured) but redefining it as assault—inflating the stats, and increasing the hysteria—is both dishonest about the causes, and in no way lessens the occurrence. Instead, women's centuries long hard-fought right to be treated as consenting adults is simply being handed back. Sexual paranoia is a formula for intellectual rigidity, and elevated levels of paranoia are dumbing down campus culture to the extent that the traditional ideal of the university—a refuge for complexity, a setting for the free exchange of ideas—is getting buried under an avalanche of platitudes. If the professoriate doesn't do more to reverse these trends, we're all the victims.

Laura Kipnis is a cultural critic and essayist whose work focuses on sexual politics, gender issues, aesthetics, popular culture, and pornography. She began her career as a video artist, exploring similar themes in the form of video essays. She is a professor at Northwestern University in the Department of Radio-TV-Film, where she teaches filmmaking. Kipnis earned a BFA at the San Francisco Art Institute and a MFA from Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. She has received fellowships for her work from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Michigan Society of Fellows and the National Endowment for the Arts. In her 2003 book Against Love: A Polemic, a "ragingly witty yet contemplative look at the discontents of domestic and erotic relationships.” In 2010 she published How to Become a Scandal: Adventures in Bad Behavior, which focused on scandal, including those of Eliot Spitzer, Linda Tripp, James Frey, Sol Wachtler, and Lisa Nowak. Her last book was Men: Notes from an Ongoing Investigation (2015). Her next, currently in progress, will be Stupid Sex/Higher Ed. Her critical essays and reviews have appeared in Slate, Harper's, Playboy, The New York Times, and Bookforum.

8:00 PM       Reception (and Dinner for Conference Badge Holders) – FAC Patio

Saturday, April 30

9:30-11:00 AM     Session One: The Current State of Title IX Law 

Laura L. Dunn (Law, University of Maryland; SurvJustice) “Campus Sexual Assault as an Institutional Balancing Act: Procedural Requirements under VAWA"

While the U.S. Department of Education’s guidance around Title IX has drawn attention to campus sexual violence, the 2013 Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Reauthorization that amended the Clery Act is what has propelled campuses forward through its creation of concrete procedural rights for both victims and those accused within campus disciplinary hearings. While VAWA took effect in March 2014, the Clery’s Act limitation to administrative enforcement through the U.S. Department of Education has allowed institutions of higher education time to achieve “good faith" compliance until its implementing regulations came out in full force for the 2015-’16 school year. As a primary negotiator on the VAWA Rulemaking Committee, I will provide insight into the balance of concerns raised regarding institutional liability, victim rights and due process for the accused as well as an overview of the consensus regulations achieved through the rule making process. Through these insights into the rule making process, and related constituency interests, VAWA and its regulations will be layered over other relevant laws, including Title IX, FERPA and relevant state affirmative consent laws, to discuss and critique best practices being proposed and implemented around campus disciplinary hearings

Laura L. Dunn is a nationally recognized victim rights attorney routinely featured in national media. In 2007, Dunn graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a B.A. in Psychology & Pre-Law and a Certificate in Criminal Justice. In 2014, Dunn received a J.D. from the University of Maryland Carey School of Law graduating Order of the Barristers and receiving the William P. Cunningham Award for her national advocacy on campus sexual assault, which included lobbying to pass the 2013 VAWA Reauthorization, advising the White House Task Force to Protect Students Against Sexual Assault, and serving as a primary negotiator on the U.S. Department of Education’s VAWA Rulemaking Committee. Dunn is also the founder and Executive Director of SurvJustice, which provides legal services to survivors across the country and trains institutions of higher education on compliance with Title IX and the Clery Act. Dunn is also an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law teaching the course Sexual Violence & Harassment in Education.

 

Nancy Cantalupo (Law, Barry University), “For the Title IX Civil Rights Movement: Congratulations and Cautions”

Our nation is in the midst of a new civil rights movement led by smart, courageous student survivors of gender-based violence who have chosen Title IX, the groundbreaking statute prohibiting sex discrimination in schools, as their particular banner. However, Title IX has recently been beset by pushes to “criminalize” it, pushes that fundamentally undermine Title IX's central purpose: to protect and promote equal educational opportunity for all students, including both the alleged perpetrators and the victims of gender-based violence. This presentation will discuss three recent state and federal legislative proposals that would criminalize Title IX in ways that undermine its civil rights protections: proposals to (1) import criminal due process requirements into campus disciplinary and grievance proceedings, (2) mandate that school officials refer all reports of sexual violence, including reports made through the school's Title IX system, to law enforcement, and (3) require colleges and universities to adopt "affirmative consent" or so-called "yes means yes" policies.

Nancy Chi Cantalupo earned her Bachelor’s and J.D. degrees from Georgetown University and a LL.M. degree from Temple University. She joined Barry University School of Law as an Assistant Professor in 2015. Prior to joining Barry, she was Associate Vice President for Equity, Inclusion & Violence Prevention at a higher education professional association, an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown Law, and a Research Fellow with the Victim Rights Law Center. She also served as Assistant Dean for Clinical Programs at Georgetown Law and Associate Director of the International Legal Studies Program at American University's Washington College of Law, and practiced with the firm of Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP. Professor Cantalupo’s scholarship focuses on the use of law to combat discriminatory violence, particularly gender-based violence. She is a nationally-recognized expert on gender-based violence in education, and her scholarship draws from her 20 years of anti-campus sexual violence work as a researcher, campus administrator, victims’ advocate, attorney, and policymaker. This work included consultations with the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, participation on a U.S. Senate roundtable, and testimony before the Maryland and Virginia state legislatures. Professor Cantalupo was also selected by the U.S. Department of Education to serve as a Primary Negotiator on the Negotiated Rulemaking Committee that was charged with implementing amendments to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act made by the 2013 Violence Against Women Act.

11:00-11:15 AM  Coffee Break

11:15 AM – 1:30 PM      Session Two: Affirmative Consent and Its Complications

Kimberly Kessler Ferzan (Law, University of Virginia), “Consent and Culpability”

This paper seeks to explore the relationship between consent and culpability.  The goal is to present a thorough exposition of the tradeoffs at play when the law adopts different conceptions of consent.  I begin by arguing that the best conception of consent—one that reflects what consent really is—is the conception of willed acquiescence.  That is, an internal choice to allow—a decision “this is okay with me”—is all that is required for one person to be allowed to contact another.  I then turn to the current victim-protecting impetus for affirmative expression standards, that is, requirements that the victim by words or conduct “said” yes or no.  I argue that affirmative expression standards suppress the underlying moral question in favor of a new rule that legislators wish the populace to follow.  This transition means that a defendant who reasonably believes the victim acquiesces will still be guilty of sexual assault—all the defendant will be permitted to argue about is whether the victim’s behavior constituted the required expression.  This allows for the possibility of strict liability, as it allows for the possibility of condemning someone who did not do anything morally culpable.  Finally, I turn to whether colleges and universities are better situated to employ affirmative consent standards than the criminal law is. 

Kimberly Kessler Ferzan is the Harrison Robertson Professor of Law and the Caddell and Chapman Professor of Law at the University of Virginia.  Ferzan is the co-editor of Law and Philosophy, and her scholarship focuses on criminal law theory.  She is currently an advisor to the American Law Institute’s project on redrafting the sexual assault provisions of the Model Penal Code.  Before entering academia in 2000, Ferzan was a federal prosecutor.

Joseph Cohn (Foundation for Individual Rights in Education), “Why We Should Say 'No' to 'Yes Means Yes'”

In recent years, California and New York have passed laws requiring colleges and universities to adjudicate campus sexual assault cases using so-called "affirmative consent" policies, and other states appear likely to follow. While hailed by some, affirmative consent policies typically require that students accused of sexual misconduct prove their innocence by demonstrating to the adjudicating panel that they obtained clear consent in advance of sexual interactions. This presentation will cover the implications this shift poses to the fundamental fairness of campus sexual misconduct proceedings. It will also cover policy improvements that campuses may implement to clarify the difference between incapacitation and intoxication.

Joseph Cohn, FIRE’s Legislative and Policy Director, is a 2004 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the Fels Institute of Government Administration, where he earned his Juris Doctor and Masters in Government Administration. Prior to law school, Joe attended the University of Nevada at Las Vegas (UNLV), where he graduated cum laude and co-founded the university’s ACLU chapter. A former staff attorney for the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and law clerk in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, Joe joins FIRE having demonstrated a career-long dedication to advancing the cause of civil liberties. He has served as a staff attorney at the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, where his work earned him accolades from The Legal Intelligencer and Pennsylvania Law Weekly (“2007 Lawyer on the Fast Track”) in 2007 and from Super Lawyers magazine (“Rising Star”) in 2008. In 2010, Joe taught at the University of Pennsylvania Law School as an adjunct professor, where he lectured on good trial practices and supervised law students as they represented real clients in both state and federal courts. Just prior to joining FIRE, Joe served as the interim legal director for ACLU affiliates in Nevada and Utah.

Chandra Kavanagh (Philosophy, McMaster University), “Who Can Make a Yes?: Disability, Sexual Consent, and ‘Yes Means Yes’”

The slogan ‘yes means yes’ has been adopted by many college anti-rape campaigns to replace the outdated slogan ‘no means no.’ The political and ethical commitments that underpin ‘no means no’ have been rightly lambasted for disingenuously ignoring the expressive capacity of the body. I argue that the ‘yes means yes’ slogan, and the political and ethical commitments that underpin the slogan, retain a variation of this problem. The position represented by ‘yes means yes’ depends on the assumption that a verbal ‘yes’ is the ideal expression of sexual consent and that other expressions of consent, such as bodily expressions, are less than ideal or even illegitimate. This is particularly problematic when considering sexual consent for people with disabilities that impact cognitive and communicative capacities. The limitations of a ‘yes means yes’ approach were exposed in the handling of two recent court cases. The first is the Anna Stubblefield case, wherein a professor was convicted of raping her nonverbal, cognitively impaired client. The second is 2010 Canadian Supreme Court case wherein the notion of ‘pre-consent’ was defended with reference to individuals with dementia and their capacity for sexual consent. Both of these cases, and the public discussion they generated, reveal the inadequacy of a ‘yes means yes’ approach to sexual consent.

Chandra Kavanagh is a doctoral student in Philosophy at McMaster University in Canada. She received her M.A. at Ryerson University, also in the field of philosophy, in 2014. Her research interests include disability bioethics, philosophy of love and sex, and philosophy of communication.

1:30-2:30 PM        Lunch Break

2:30-4:00 PM        Session Three: Social Science Perspectives

Callie Rennison (Public Policy, University of Colorado Denver), “Toward a Better Understanding of Estimates of Sexual Violence against College Students”

Although sexual violence against college students – especially female college students - has been a topic of academic interest for decades, it recently has become the subject of intense interest beyond academic circles. For example, the belief that one in five college women are raped has become “common knowledge”, leading to the notion that college campuses are epicenters of sexual violence where students are at great risk. Yet, other less publicized estimates suggest quite differently – that sexual violence against college women, while too frequent, is not spiraling out of control. Rather, some of this research indicates that sexual violence against college women occurs at lower rates than it does to their non-college attending counterparts. What explains these divergent findings? The purpose of this presentation is to describe research offering estimates of sexual aggression and victimization, with a focus on methodology, advantages and disadvantages of each.

Callie Rennison is the Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs, Professor, and the MCJ Program Director at the School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado Denver. She earned her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Houston, as well as a BS in Psychology and MA in Sociology. She recently served on a National Academies Committee examining domestic sex trafficking of minors in the United States and was a Senior Researcher at the Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics. Her research focuses on the nature, extent, and consequences of violent victimization with an emphasis on research methodology, quantitative analysis, and measurement, especially in regards to the National Crime Victimization Survey, and has appeared in numerous journals including the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Violence and Victims, and Violence Against Women. She is co-author of Introduction to Criminal Justice: Systems, Diversity and Change (2015), and co-editor of the Wiley-Blackwell Handbook on the Psychology of Violence (2016).

Deborah Davis (Psychology, University of Nevada, Reno), “Pathways to Honest False Testimony in Cases of Disputed Sexual Consent: The Roles of Alcohol, Sexual Scripts, and Indirect Sexual Communication”

There is a tendency in our evaluation of cases of alleged sexual assault to assume that one party is lying and the other is telling the truth.  This presentation will review evidence suggesting that in many cases both parties may be telling the truth: but through the lens of their own memories and interpretations of what happened. These interpretations and memories can be distorted predictably. Sexual communications are often intentionally indirect and ambiguous, designed to avoid social risks such as being seen as sexually aggressive or of offending the other party.  This ambiguity leaves room for each party to misinterpret the other’s intentions, based on their own motives, desires, background and other personal context. Such interpretations are also driven by cultural sexual scripts suggesting the meaning of various behaviors. As with memory for anything, memories of sexual interactions can become distorted after the fact by many of the same assumptions, scripts, motives, self-concept and other contextual factors. When alcohol is added to this mix, the potential for memory distortion becomes greater.  This presentation will review data suggesting what kinds of behaviors are most likely to be interpreted differently by men and women, posing greater risk of initial miscommunication. It will then turn to research on alcohol, miscommunication and memory distortion to provide the basis for prediction of the types of false memories of sexual encounters most likely to develop among participants who were intoxicated at the time of the encounter.

Deborah Davis earned her BA from the University of Texas at Austin and Ph.D. from Ohio State University. She is Professor of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno and a member of the Faculty of the National Judicial College. She has published over 100 book chapters and journal articles in the areas of witness memory, interrogations and confessions, issues of communication of sexual consent and others. Her research on interrogations has been supported by a grant from the FBI. She has given CLE seminars on each of these topics for attorney organizations in the United States and Canada, and has testified as an expert witness in over 100 trials across the United States.

4:00-5:30 PM Session Four: Educating about Rape

Maria-Belén Ordóñez (Sociology, Ontario College of Art and Design University), “Circuits of Power and Desire: The case of Dominique Strauss-Khan and Critical Pedagogies of Consent” 

 

This paper follows the reverberations of a sex scandal involving the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) former head, Dominique Strauss-Khan (DSK).  As a case study, I focus on the political surges of desire, power, and violence made accessible through international media coverage that both nurtures and ruptures gendered, raced, and classed relations. What emerged as a result of DSK and Nafissatou Diallo’s encounter were messy entanglements and articulations of consent. DSK for example, insisted that his encounter with Diallo was consensual and his privilege, he thought, would clearly grant him diplomatic immunity reserved for men of his social rank. Nafissatou Diallo (and others not connected to the charges) soon came to disrupt the apparently simple narrative of bourgeois respectability and privilege by effectively stirring the signification of power and consensual sex. The multiple contexts and responses to this case provides relevant groundwork for furthering discussions of consent in public spaces. Specifically, the university classroom is an opportunity to contextualize the experiences of citizen-students, whose observations of public life influence perceptions of consent that are closest to them. Questions of consent raised in this paper engage with students in a feminist theory class of an art and design university in Toronto (Ontario College of Art and Design University) and engage the nuances of consent during a well publicized sexual assault trial in Toronto in February 2015; Jian Ghomeshi, a once celebrated public radio host for the Canadian Broadcast Corporation was on trial for seven counts of sexual assault, and one count of overcoming resistance by choking, against six women. This media backdrop helped to inform and make connections to the DSK case as well as inspiring broader questions of consent in public culture. Key points of discussion include tracking how student activists at the Cambridge Union Society, the largest debating society in Cambridge, responded and actively mobilized to cancel DSK’s lecture presentation on campus. Meanwhile in New York, hotel chambermaids took to the streets to protest what they saw (and experienced) as an all too familiar and silent occurrence of violence in the service industries. Narratives of sexual assault became entangled with narratives of labour rights, freedom of expression, activism, and feminism.

Maria-Belén Ordóñez earned her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from York University, and is now Assistant Professor of Sociology at the Ontario College of Design and Arts University. Her ethnographic research has been based in Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver where she has engaged with the affective impacts of events in disparate locations such as media headlines; queer identified spaces of pleasure and activism, and contested zones of censorship and regulation. Her research has included the investigation and tracking of affect in Canadian legislative challenges dealing with sex, sexuality, censorship, and morality. Specifically, the cases of R v. Sharpe (child pornography), R v. Bedford (bawdy house laws), the police raid of the Taboo gay strip club in Montreal (the targeting of young gay strippers), and Canadian legislation that raised the age of consent from 14 to 16 years of age. She is also a collaborator in developing and teaching curriculum for FemTechNet (femtechnet.org), an internationally distributed network of feminist artists, scholars, and activists, teaching and doing research in feminist science, media, art, and technology. The Distributed Online Collaborative Course (DOCC), "Dialogues in Feminism and Technology" was launched in 2013-14 in Digital Futures at OCAD University, along with 18 participating institutions as part of a FemTechNet pedagogical initiative. Belén Ordóñez teaches feminist theory, multi-sited and experimental ethnography, popular culture, and body politics at OCAD University in Toronto.

Kathy L. Gaca (Classics and Divinity, Vanderbilt University), “The Paradox of College Rape Culture from an Ancient Mediterranean Perspective”

A college education is oriented toward intellectual and moral betterment, toward enhancing self-worth and opportunities for female and male students alike.  Nonetheless, the fundamental problematic aspects of college rape culture are, from an ancient Mediterranean perspective, evocative of freeborn men treating war-captive girls and women as slaves, as the opposite of fellow peer citizens, such as making young women semi-comatose from alcohol and drugs and then sexually penetrating them with indifference toward the women's volition, their sense of self worth, their hopes for themselves, and their parents' hopes for their daughters.  The ancients would find it astounding that colleges of all places are a locus where young women in a free society, a society that has supposedly transcended slavery, are at risk of being treated as the equivalent of sexually violable slaves by some of their male peers.  We should find the discrepancy and lingering pockets of complacency about it astounding too.

Kathy L. Gaca is Associate Professor of Classics and an Associate of the Divinity School at Vanderbilt University.  Her research explores how sexual norms rooted in antiquity inform current concerns of social injustice and violence against women and girls.  She is the author of The Making of Fornication: Eros, Ethics, and Political Reform in Greek Philosophy and Early Christianity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003) and of numerous articles. She is currently at work on her second book, Sexual Warfare against Girls and Women: Ancient Society and Religion, Modern Witness, and has published “Girls, Women, and the Significance of Sexual Violence in Ancient Warfare” in Sexual Violence in Conflict Zones: From the Ancient World to the Era of Human Rights, edited by Elizabeth Heineman (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011).  She received her PhD in Classics at the University of Toronto and held the Hannah Seeger Davis Postdoctoral Fellowship in Hellenic Studies at Princeton University.

5:30-5:45 PM        Coffee Break

5:45-7:00 PM        Session Five: Addressing Campus Rape in Texas

LaToya Hill Smith (Associate Vice President and Title IX Coordinator, University Compliance Services, University of Texas, Austin)

Erin Burrows (Coordinator, Voices Against Violence, University of Texas, Austin)

Ted Rutherford (Communications Director, Texas Association Against Sexual Assault)

 

7:30 PM       Dinner for Conference Presenters (Freedmen’s Barbecue, 2402 San Gabriel St., just North of 24th St.)