Department of Classics

Cristina Carusi


Assistant ProfessorPhD 2006, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa

Cristina Carusi

Contact

Interests


Greek History; Greek Epigraphy; Law, Economy, and Institutions of Greek City-States; Salt Studies; Documentary Papyrology

Biography


Before joining the Department of Classics at UT Austin, Cristina Carusi (PhD 2006, Scuola Normale Superiore) held research appointments in Greek history at the Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa, at the Italian Archaeological School at Athens, and at the University of Parma. She held research fellowships in France (École Normale Supérieure), Spain (Casa de Vélazquez), and US (Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington DC).

Her research interests include classical and Hellenistic Greece, epigraphy, and documentary papyrology, with a special focus on institutions, law, and economy. In addition to several articles and entries in international volumes and journals, her latest publications include a book on the production, commerce and taxation of salt in the Greek world (Edipuglia 2008) and a co-edited volume on the Athenian grain-tax law of 374/3 (ETS 2010). She is currently working on a comprehensive study of the legal and economic aspects of public building in classical Athens, with particular attention to epigraphic sources.

Courses


AHC 325 • Alexander/Hellenistic World

32905-32920 • Spring 2017
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 201
(also listed as HIS 351D)

Alexander and the Hellenistic World

This course covers Greek history from the subordination of Greece to Philip II, king of Macedonia, and his heir and successor Alexander the Great, in 338 BCE through the Hellenistic world's loss of independence to Rome some 300 years later. This era is defined by the charismatic figure of Alexander the Great and by his military campaigns, which led to the conquest of all the eastern Mediterranean and made possible the spread of Greek culture all over Anatolia, Persia, Mesopotamia, Syria, and Egypt. After Alexander's death, his empire was divided into the three Hellenistic kingdoms of Egypt, Syria, and Macedonia until Rome's progressive absorption of them in the 2nd and 1st c. BCE.

The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era (literary, epigraphic, papyrological, and archeological sources). There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week. The two lectures will combine historical outline with the exploration of specific themes and problems, such as systems of government, social structures, economy, culture, religion, and war, while the discussion sections will be focused on how to analyze, interpret, and use ancient sources.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag.

C C 383 • Epigraphy/Econ Of Gk Cities

33050 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 214
(also listed as GK 390)

Epigraphy and the Economy of the Greek Cities.

This seminar intends to offer a survey of the main categories of inscriptions involved in the study of the economy of the Greek cities. The seminar will open with a series of introductory classes on how to approach epigraphic material (including how to edit inscriptions) and then will proceed to the analysis of specific texts (or groups of texts), including secondary literature concerned with the economic questions raised by the text. Student will practice the editing of an inscription by making use of Merrit squeezes at HRC (20% of final grade). In addition each student will be responsible for his/her own research project focused on a specific inscription or category of inscriptions (60% of final grade, including a research paper and an oral presentation). The rest of the final grade (20%) will be made up by in-class participation and weekly prompts. Texts: L. Migeotte, The Economy of the Greek Cities; various articles and chapters provided in PDF files by the instructor. We’ll make use as much as possible of the collection of Benjamin Merrit squeezes at HRC.

GK 324 • Against Neaira

33130 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.208

The main goal of this course is to improve students’ facility in reading and understanding Greek. In order to achieve this goal, we will read, translate, and analyze a specimen of 4th c. Attic oratory, the speech Against Neaira, with particular attention to syntax, morphology, and vocabulary. Even if part of the Demosthenic corpus, the Against Neaira is almost certainly the work of a minor orator and Athenian politician, Apollodorus. Despite his political dimension, the speech was ostensibly written for a trial concerning a Corinthian prostitute’s usurpation of Athenian citizenship – an extremely rare example of a trial in which a woman was the defendant. As such, the Against Neaira holds exceptional interest not only for aspects of legal procedure and citizenship right in 4th c. Athens, but also for the insight it gives into Athenian social life, in particular the life of women, from slave prostitutes through expensive courtesans to the wives and daughters of citizens.

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32205-32220 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM WEL 2.304
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

Carries the Global Cultures and Writing flags.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

32235-32245 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354D, HIS 354D)

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

AHC 325 • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

33110-33120 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354C, HIS 354C)

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a required one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

GK 365 • Classical Historiog & Gk Prose

33490 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as GK 385)

Classical Historiography and Greek Prose

The main goal of this course is to improve students’ facility in reading and understanding Greek. In order to achieve this goal, we will read, translate, and analyze a representative selection of Classical historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon) and Greek prose in general (Old Oligarch, Lysias, Plato, Demosthenes, Isocrates, Polybius, Plutarch, etc.).

In the process, we will examine points of syntax and morphology and track the development and diversity of prose style, with particular attention to the prose of the classical historiographers. We will also discuss the different ways in which the main historiographers approached the task of writing history.

Students will have written exercises, oral presentations, and three translation tests. Students in GK 365 will have some secondary reading and additional writing assignments, while students in GK 385 will have additional Greek reading.

Texts:

Demosthenes, Third Philippic

Herodotus, Histories

Isocrates, Panegyric

Lysias, On the murder of Erathostenes

Old Oligarch, Constitution of the Athenians

Plato, Apology

Plutarch, Life of Pericles

Polybius, Histories

Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War

Xenophon, Hellenica and Memorabilia

Grading Policy:

GK 365: translation tests 55%, term paper 25%, class participation and exercises 20%

GK 385: translation tests 80%, class participation and exercises 20%

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

33485-33495 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354D, EUS 346, HIS 354D)

This course covers Greek history from the fall of Athens in 404 BC through Greece's loss of independence to Rome some 250 years later--an era defined by the figure of Alexander the Great.Classes will focus on five successive periods: (1) the decline of Greece's independent city-states; (2) their subordination to a Greek-speaking Macedonia under Philip II and his son, Alexander the Great; (3) Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire; (4) the resulting Hellenistic Age of Greek kingdoms in Egypt, Syria and Macedonia; and (5) Rome's absorption of both Macedonia and mainland Greece.The course will devote roughly equal time to covering major events and personalities, exploring key developments in culture and society, and examining the various types of evidence available for the era.  There will be two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

GK 324 • Herodotus

33851 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 112

In this course we will read The Histories of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, the Father of History.

Thanks to a selection of the most significant passages of his work, we will follow Herodotus through his travels to Lydia, Persia, Egypt, Libya, Scythia, and Greece, up to the culmination of the Persian Wars; we will meet, among others, with Croesus, Darius, Xerxes, Miltiades, Leonidas, and Themistocles; we will appreciate Herodotus’ intellectual curiosity and rational skepticism - maybe inherited by the philosophers of his native Ionia – and his ability of consummate story-teller; we will enjoy the fruits of his own first-hand enquiry, his own historie; and, to put it in Herodotus’ own words, we will commit ourselves “to ensure that the passage of time does not erase the past from men’s minds and that the great and astonishing achievements of both Greeks and barbaroi do not go unsung”.

Grading:

  • Homework and class activities 25%
  • Tests 30%
  • Midterm 20%
  • Final 25%

Texts:

A.L. Barbour and M.O. Drinkwater, Selections from Herodotus, 2nd edition, University of Oklahoma Press, ISBN 0-8061-1427-4.

AHC 325 • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

33150-33165 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354C, HIS 354C)

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a required one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

AHC 378 • Economies Of The Greek Cities

33175 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM CBA 4.346

Over the past few decades the study of the ancient economy has developed into one of the most intriguing and promising research fields in classical studies. Thanks to new studies of ancient documents and archaeological evidence, and new theoretical frameworks, we can now reconstruct more fully many important sectors of the private and public economy of the ancient Greek world, including agriculture, craft industries, mining, building, trade, coinage, and taxation.

This course will explore these and related topics within the context of the Greek city from the archaic age to the Hellenistic period, with special attention to classical Athens.

The course will be conducted as a seminar with student participation central to its success.  We will discuss key topics using the full range of ancient evidence, from literary and epigraphic sources to archaeological remains. Drawing on recent scholarship, we will also explore research methodology and theoretical problems raised by the study of the ancient economy.

This course carries the Writing flag and the Independent Inquiry flag.

L. Migeotte, The Economy of the Greek Cities, University of California Press, ISBN: 9780520253667

M.M. Austin & P. Vidal-Naquet, Economic and Social History of Ancient Greece, University of California Press, ISBN: 9780520042674.

Publications


Books

1. Il sale nel mondo greco (VI a.C.- III d.C.). Luoghi di produzione, circolazione commerciale, regimi di sfruttamento nel contesto del Mediterraneo antico. Edipuglia, Bari 2008.

2. Isole e Peree in Asia Minore. Contributi allo studio dei rapporti tra poleis insulari e territori continentali dipendenti. Pubblicazioni della Classe di Lettere e Filosofia della Scuola Normale, Pisa 2003.

Co-edited volumes

1. Nuove ricerche sulla legge granaria ateniese del 374/3 a.C. (with Anna Magnetto and Donatella Erdas). ETS, Pisa 2010.

Articles

1. “Vita humanior sine sale non quit degere: Demand for Salt and Salt Trade Patterns in the Ancient Greek World”. Markets, Households, and the Ancient Greek Economy, ed. by E.M. Harris, D.M. Lewis, M. Woolmer, Cambridge University Press 2015: 337-355.

2. “The lease of the Piraeus theatre and the lease terminology in classical Athens”. ZPE 188 (2014): 111-135.

3. “La Grecia nord-occidentale e il problema storico del rapporto fra isole e peree”. Ethne, identità e tradizioni: La terza Grecia e l’Occidente, I, ed. by L. Breglia, A. Moleti, M.L. Napolitano, ETS, Pisa 2011: 89-112.

4. “Hypotheses, considerations – and unknown factors – regarding the demand for salt in Ancient Greece”. Archaeology and Anthropology of Salt: A Diachronic Approach. Proceedings of the International Colloquium, (1-5 October 2008, Iasi, Romania), ed. By M. Alexianu, O. Weller, R.-G. Curca, BAR International Series 2198, Oxford 2011: 149-154.

5. “La legge di Agirrio e le syngraphai ateniesi di IV secolo”. Nuove ricerche sulla legge granaria ateniese del 374/3 a.C., ed. by A. Magnetto, D. Erdas, C. Carusi, ETS, Pisa 2010: 213-233.

6. “Nota a P.Worp 57”. ZPE 168 (2009): 219-220.

7. “Intorno alla produzione di sale a Populonia e nell’ager cosanus: due casi di studio a confronto”. Materiali per Populonia 7, ed. by. V. Acconcia, C. Rizzitelli, ETS, Pisa 2008: 303-312.

8. “Le sel chez les auteurs grecs et latins”. Sel, eau et forêt. D’hier à aujourd’hui, ed. by O. Weller, A. Dufraisse, P. Pétrequin, Presses Universitaire de Franche-Comté, Besançon 2008: 353-364.

9. “Régimes d’exploitation et fiscalité du sel dans le monde grec et romain”. Las salinas y la sal de interior en la historia: economia, medioambiente y sociedad, ed. by N. Morère , Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid 2007: 325-342.

10. “Le commerce du sel dans l’Antiquité grecque”. L’exploitation du sel à travers le temps, ed. by D. Monah, G. Dumitroaia, O. Weller, J. Chapman, BMA XVIII, Piatra Neamt 2007: 221-233.

11. “Recherches sur le sel dans la Méditerranée orientale pendant l’Âge du Bronze Récent”. 1a Trobada internacional d’arquelogia envers l’explotació de la sal a la prehistòria (Cardona 2003), ed. by A. Figuls, O. Weller, IREC, Cardona 2007: 257-279.

12. “Essai d’histoire du sel dans le monde grec”. Le sel de la Baie. Histoire, archéologie, ethnologie des sels atlantiques, ed. by J.-Cl. Hocquet, J.-L. Sarrazin, Presses Universitaires de Rennes 2006: 55-63.

13. “Alcune considerazioni sulle syngraphai ateniesi del V e del IV secolo”. ASAA 84 (2006): 11-36 [2008].

14. “Nuova edizione della homologia fra Trezene e Arsinoe (IG IV 752, IG IV² 76+77)”. Studi Ellenistici XVI, ed. by B. Virgilio, Giardini editori, Pisa 2005: 79-139.

15. “Revisioni e controlli delle liste dei cittadini: la diapsephisis ateniese del 346/5 a.C.” (with Ugo Fantasia). Poleis e Politeiai. Esperienze politiche, tradizioni letterarie, progetti costituzionali. Atti del Convegno internazionale di storia greca (Torino, 29-31 maggio 2002), ed. by S. Cataldi, Edizioni dell'Orso, Alessandria 2004: 187-216.

Entries in reference works

1. Update of “Athenian Economy”. Oxford Bibliographies in Classics, ed. by D. Clayman, Oxford University Press, New York 02.25.2016 (http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195389661/obo-9780195389661-0099.xml).

2. “exetazo”. Lexicon historiographicum graecum et latinum (LHG&L), III (b-z), ed. by C. Ampolo, U. Fantasia, L. Porciani, Edizioni della Normale, Pisa 2015:143-147.

3. “diastole”. Lexicon historiographicum graecum et latinum (LHG&L), III (b-z), ed. by C. Ampolo, U. Fantasia, L. Porciani, Edizioni della Normale, Pisa 2015: 60-62.

4. “Imperialism, Greek (classical and hellenistic)”. The Encyclopedia of Ancient History, ed. by R. Bagnall, K. Brodersen, C. Champion, E. Erskine, S. Huebner,Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford 2013: 3424-3426 (DOI: 10.1002/9781444338386.wbeah04342).

5. “Athenian Economy”. Oxford Bibliographies in Classics, ed. by D. Clayman, Oxford University Press, New York 10.25.2012 (http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195389661/obo-9780195389661-0099.xml).

6. “aphorme”. Lexicon historiographicum graecum et latinum (LHG&L), II (al-aph), ed. by C. Ampolo, U. Fantasia, L. Porciani, Edizioni della Normale, Pisa 2007: 152-155.

Papyri and Ostraca

1. “Ricevute del balaneutikon dei templi (nos. 207-211)”. Ostraca greci e bilingui del Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology (O.Petr.Mus.), ed. by M.S. Funghi, G. Messeri, C.E. Römer, Papyrologica Florentina XLII, Firenze 2012: 283-288.

2. “Ricevute di laographia (nos. 230, 233-235, 237-238, 240-249)”. Ostraca greci e bilingui del Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology (O.Petr.Mus.), ed. by M.S. Funghi, G. Messeri, C.E. Römer, Papyrologica Florentina XLII, Firenze 2012: 308-309, 311-314, 315-317, 318-330.

3. “Ricevute di chomatikon (nos. 299-300, 307)”. Ostraca greci e bilingui del Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology (O.Petr.Mus.), ed. by M.S. Funghi, G. Messeri, C.E. Römer, Papyrologica Florentina XLII, Firenze 2012: 389-391, 398-400.

4. “Ricevuta (n. 325)”. Ostraca greci e bilingui del Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology (O.Petr.Mus.), ed. by M.S. Funghi, G. Messeri, C.E. Römer, Papyrologica Florentina XLII, Firenze 2012: 418-419.

5. “Note di magazzino (nos. 439-465)”. Ostraca greci e bilingui del Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology (O.Petr.Mus.), ed. by M.S. Funghi, G. Messeri, C.E. Römer, Papyrologica Florentina XLII, Firenze 2012: 545-574.

6. “Appunto riguardante un’abitazione (n. 476)”. Ostraca greci e bilingui del Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology (O.Petr.Mus.), ed. by M.S. Funghi, G. Messeri, C.E. Römer, Papyrologica Florentina XLII, Firenze 2012: 582.

7. “Petizione per esonero da liturgie (PSI inv. 1611)”. Comunicazioni dell’Istituto Papirologico ‘G. Vitelli’ vol. 6: Papiri della Società Italiana alla Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. Seminario 2003/2004, ed. by G. Bastianini, M.S. Funghi, G. Messeri, Firenze 2005: 117-123, nr. 16.

Reviews

1. P. Martzavou and N. Papazarkadas (eds.), Epigraphical Approaches to the Post-Classical Polis. Fourth Century BC to Second Century AD. Oxford University Press 2013. Sehepunkte 15 (2015), nr. 10 (URL: http://www.sehepunkte.de/2015/10/22613.html).

2. E. Greco (ed.), Lemno: dai ‘Tirreni’ agli Ateniesi. Problemi storici, archeologici, topografici e linguistici (Napoli, 4 maggio 2011), and E. Culasso Gastaldi & D. Marchiandi (eds.), Gli Ateniesi fuori dall’Attica: modi d'intervento e di controllo del territorio (Torino, 8-9 aprile 2010). Annuario della Scuola Archeologica di Atene e delle missioni italiane in oriente 88, Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Athens 2012. JHS 134 (2014): 179-180 (DOI: 10.1017/S0075426914001694).

3. Tout vendre, tout acheter. International Colloquium, Athens, 16-17 June 2009 (with Gianluca Casa). SITEG (The Italian website of Greek Epigraphy) 2009 (http://www.siteg.it/index.php/news/view/tout-vendre-tout-acheter-16-19-juin-2009).

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