Department of Classics

Cynthia W Shelmerdine


Professor EmeritusPh.D., Harvard University

Robert M. Armstrong Centennial Professor Emerita of Classics
Cynthia W Shelmerdine

Contact

Interests


Aegean Bronze Age

Biography


 

Cynthia W. Shelmerdine is Robert M. Armstrong Centennial Professor of Classics, emerita at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research specialties are Aegean Bronze Age archaeology, and the language, history and society of Mycenaean Greece. She has published extensively on the history and culture of prehistoric Greece and Crete. Her recent publications include The Cambridge Companion to the Aegean Bronze Age(Cambridge 2008, editor and contributor), “Mycenaean Furniture and Vessels: Text and Image,” in M.-L. Nosch and R. Laffineur, eds., KOSMOS: Jewelry, Adornment and Textiles in the Aegean Bronze Age, Liège: Peeters 2012, 685-695, and “Pylos Sealings and Sealers,” in P. Carlier, C. de Lamberterie, M. Egetmeyer, N. Guilleux, F. Rougemont and J. Zurbach, eds., Études Mycéniennes 2010, Actes du XIIIe Colloque International sur les Textes Égéens, Sèvres, Paris, Nanterre, 20-23 Septembre 2010. Pisa and Rome: Fabrizio Serra 2012, 383-402. She is currently working on a book about Mycenaean Greek society. Professor Shelmerdine is a ceramic and historical expert for the Iklaina Archaeological Project (University of Missouri-St. Louis and the Athens Archaeological Society). She also participated in the excavation of Nichoria by the Minnesota Messenia Expedition, and in the Pylos Regional Archaeological Project. She was educated at Bryn Mawr College (A.B. 1970), the University of Cambridge (B.A. 1972, M.A. 1980), and Harvard University (Ph.D. in Classical Philology 1977).

 

Courses


C C 340 • Intro To The Aegean Bronze Age

32700 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 214

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

GK 365 • Adv Rdng: Euripides

32900 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.336

GK 365 Seminar in Greek:

Critical study of authors such as Thucydides, Demosthenes, and Aeschylus.

Prerequisites: Greek 324 or 328.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

33080 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM JES A121A

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

33305 • Fall 2007
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

32145 • Spring 2007
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM RAS 313A

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

C C 383 • Bronze Age

32770 • Fall 2006
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

31245 • Spring 2006
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

C C 303 • Intro To Classcl Mythol-Hon-W

30490 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythol-Hon

30275 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

30510 • Fall 2004
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

C C 383 • Intro To The Aegean Bronze Age

28555 • Spring 2004
Meets MW 1:30PM-3:00PM WAG 10

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

C C 303 • Classical Mythology

28735 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WCH 1.120

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

28980 • Fall 2003
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

C C 383 • Problems In Aegean Prehistory

29085 • Fall 2001
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10
(also listed as GK 390)

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

GK W398R • Master's Report

82760 • Summer 2001

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three hours a week for one semester.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing in Greek and consent of the graduate adviser.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

28725 • Spring 2001
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

29205 • Fall 2000
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

C C 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

28035 • Spring 2000

Prerequisite: Classical Civilization 679HA.

Supervised conference course for honors candidates in classics. Three conference hours a week for two semesters.

Majors who plan to seek special honors in Ancient History and Classical Civilization, special honors in Greek, special honors in Latin, or special honors in Classics should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program at least one full academic year before they expect to graduate. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the coursework required for the major of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the requirements of the major, are (1) AHC 679HA and 679HB-W, Greek 679HA and 679HB-W, Latin 679HA and 679HB-W, or Classical Civilization 679HA and 679HB-W, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of A in each half; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the coursework required for the major and an “A” in each half of the honors tutorial course; and (3) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Requirements for the Honors Thesis

(1.) The student must discuss the Honors program option with the Faculty Academic Advisor.
(2.) The student must fill out and have signed a Conference Course form for the 679HA and 679HB-W courses.
(3.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HA for directed reading and research under a faculty mentor.
(4.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HB-W writing the Honors Thesis. Students should consult a semester academic calendar and consult with their faculty mentors to determine a schedule for completion of the Thesis. A second faculty reader must also review the Thesis.
(5.) The College of Liberal Arts expects a Thesis to require at least 20 pages of reviewed and revised text. Although there is no other required minimum, the Thesis should consist of more substantial output.
(6.) The final version of the Thesis must be turned in to the Department of Classics Undergraduate Advisor in an electronic (PDF) format or bound copy.

Carries an Independent Inquiry flag.

GK 390 • Mycenaean And Minoan Religion

28215 • Spring 2000
Meets MW 1:30PM-3:00PM WAG 10

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

Curriculum Vitae


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