Department of Classics

David Armstrong


Professor EmeritusPhD, The University of Texas Austin

David Armstrong

Contact

Interests


Latin Poetry, Ancient Literary Criticism, Hellenistic and Roman Literature

Biography


Fields: Latin Poetry, Ancient Literary Criticism, Hellenistic and Roman Literature

Honors: Mellon Emeritus Fellowship


Courses


GK W412 • Intensive Greek

82300 • Summer 2010

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

GK W412 • Intensive Greek

82980 • Summer 2005

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

GK 390 • Greek Composition

30595 • Fall 2004
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

LAT 385 • Horace

30835 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 10

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

GK 180K • Textual Criticism

29035 • Fall 2003
Meets W 3:00PM-4:00PM WAG 10

This course is meant to provide new graduate students with an introduction to materials and methods of classical scholarship.  The instructor and other members of the department will present introductory lectures and bibliographies on the various disciplines involved in contemporary classical studies.  

Students will be required to attend lectures and colloquia, given by visitors and members of our department.

All students should register for this course on a credit/no credit basis.

GK 385 • Literary Criticism

29060 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 385)

GK 385 Graduate Reading Course:

Topics given in recent years include Plato and Greek prose, Sophocles, and Sophists.

LAT 323 • Caesar

29270 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 208

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

28745 • Fall 2002
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

LAT 390 • Cicero: Readings

29090 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

LAT 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

GK W804 • Intensive First-Year Greek

83155 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-11:00AM WAG 10

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

28100 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 365 • Juvenal

28685 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112

LAT 365 Seminar in Latin:

Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

GK 180K • Rsch Meths In Classical Stds

29215 • Fall 2001
Meets F 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 180K)

This course is meant to provide new graduate students with an introduction to materials and methods of classical scholarship.  The instructor and other members of the department will present introductory lectures and bibliographies on the various disciplines involved in contemporary classical studies.  

Students will be required to attend lectures and colloquia, given by visitors and members of our department.

All students should register for this course on a credit/no credit basis.

LAT 323 • Ovid

29440 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

LAT 385 • Satire

29495 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 10

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

LAT W398R • Master's Report

82915 • Summer 2001

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three hours a week for one semester. 

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing in Latin and consent of the graduate adviser.
 

 

LAT S312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

82960 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 201

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312.

C C 303 • Classical Mythology

28475 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 180K • Proseminar: Textual Criticism

28782 • Spring 2001
Meets T 3:30PM-4:30PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 180K)

This course is meant to provide new graduate students with an introduction to materials and methods of classical scholarship.  The instructor and other members of the department will present introductory lectures and bibliographies on the various disciplines involved in contemporary classical studies.  

Students will be required to attend lectures and colloquia, given by visitors and members of our department.

All students should register for this course on a credit/no credit basis.

LAT 323 • Vergil's Eclogues And Georgics

29020 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 3.422

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

LAT 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

29050 • Spring 2001

Majors who plan to seek special honors in Ancient History and Classical Civilization, special honors in Greek, special honors in Latin, or special honors in Classics should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program at least one full academic year before they expect to graduate. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the coursework required for the major of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the requirements of the major, are (1) AHC 679HA and 679HB-W, Greek 679HA and 679HB-W, Latin 679HA and 679HB-W, or Classical Civilization 679HA and 679HB-W, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of A in each half; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the coursework required for the major and an “A” in each half of the honors tutorial course; and (3) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Requirements for the Honors Thesis:

(1.) The student must discuss the Honors program option with the Faculty Academic Advisor.
(2.) The student must fill out and have signed a Conference Course form for the 679HA and 679HB-W courses.
(3.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HA for directed reading and research under a faculty mentor.
(4.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HB-W writing the Honors Thesis. Students should consult a semester academic calendar and consult with their faculty mentors to determine a schedule for completion of the Thesis. A second faculty reader must also review the Thesis.
(5.) The College of Liberal Arts expects a Thesis to require at least 20 pages of reviewed and revised text. Although there is no other required minimum, the Thesis should consist of more substantial output.
(6.) The final version of the Thesis must be turned in to the Department of Classics Undergraduate Advisor in an electronic (PDF) format or bound copy.

Carries an Independent Inquiry flag.

GK 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

29245 • Fall 2000
(also listed as LAT 679HA)

Prerequisites:  Upper-division standing and admission to the honors program in Greek.

Course Description:  Supervised conference course for honors candidates in Greek. Three conference hours a week for two semesters.

Majors who plan to seek special honors in Ancient History and Classical Civilization, special honors in Greek, special honors in Latin, or special honors in Classics should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program at least one full academic year before they expect to graduate. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the coursework required for the major of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the requirements of the major, are (1) AHC 679HA and 679HB-W, Greek 679HA and 679HB-W, Latin 679HA and 679HB-W, or Classical Civilization 679HA and 679HB-W, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of A in each half; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the coursework required for the major and an “A” in each half of the honors tutorial course; and (3) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Requirements for the Honors Thesis:

(1.) The student must discuss the Honors program option with the Faculty Academic Advisor.
(2.) The student must fill out and have signed a Conference Course form for the 679HA and 679HB-W courses.
(3.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HA for directed reading and research under a faculty mentor.
(4.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HB-W writing the Honors Thesis. Students should consult a semester academic calendar and consult with their faculty mentors to determine a schedule for completion of the Thesis. A second faculty reader must also review the Thesis.
(5.) The College of Liberal Arts expects a Thesis to require at least 20 pages of reviewed and revised text. Although there is no other required minimum, the Thesis should consist of more substantial output.
(6.) The final version of the Thesis must be turned in to the Department of Classics Undergraduate Advisor in an electronic (PDF) format or bound copy.

Carries an Independent Inquiry flag.

LAT 385 • Lucretius

29535 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 208

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

LAT 390 • Cicero: Readings

29550 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

LAT 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Roman studies. Topics given in recent years include Roman comedy, Pliny, and Roman fragmentary historians.

GK W804 • Intensive First-Year Greek

82765 • Summer 2000
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-11:00AM WAG 10

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

GK W412 • Intensive Greek

82775 • Summer 2000

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

LAT W398R • Master's Report

82950 • Summer 2000

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three hours a week for one semester. 

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing in Latin and consent of the graduate adviser.
 

 

LAT 323 • Ovid

28415 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 200

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

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