Department of Classics

Karl Galinsky


ProfessorPh.D., Princeton

Professor: Floyd A. Cailloux Centennial Professor, University Distinguished Teaching Professor
Karl Galinsky

Contact

Interests


Roman Literature and Civilization; Cultural Memory in Ancient Rome; Classical Tradition in Popular Culture

Biography


FieldsRoman Literature and Civilization, Memory studies, Rome and America

 

 

Courses


C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

32925 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WEL 1.308

The course is a survey of some of the highlights of Roman civilizationfrom its 8th cent. B.C. beginnings to the so called Fall of the Roman Empire in A.D. 476.  We will look not only at political history, but also at art, literature, architecture, and religion, and we'll pursuesome continuing questions such as: What caused Rome's growth?  How were the Romans able to develop a lasting and stable system of government, which the framers of the American Constitution had very much in mind? Rome, like America, was a mix of different cultures and yet maintained unity in all the diversity--e pluribus unum indeed.  What are some ofthe other parallels between the Roman and the American experience and what are the limits of such analogies?  In addition, we'll look at the genesis of early Christianity within the Roman cultural context of the times.  In so many words, besides acquainting students with a solid factual basis for Roman history, the course will also identify some ofthe abiding issues that have made Roman civilization such a fascinating subject for imitation, admiration, loathing, and anything in betweenfor subsequent generations, right up to our own times. There are no prerequisites for this course. There will be four one-hour exams (half essay, half multiple choice); the one with the lowest grade will count somewhat less than the others.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Texts:

  • A. Kamm, The Romans  (Routledge)
  • Suetonius, Twelve Caesars  (Penguin)
  • R. Fitzgerald tr., Aeneid of Virgil  (Random)
  • G. Vidal, Julian  (Ballantine)
  • Also, Course Packet

LAT 383 • Survey Of Latin Literature

33345 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM CLA 0.124

LAT 383 Graduate Reading:

Topics given in recent years include Latin prose, Seneca, and Augustine's Confessions.

GK 312K • Intermediate Greek II

32400 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 1.102

The Odyssey is in just about everybody’s top ten of world literature, not in the least because it’s simply so enjoyable and entertaining. It is a privilege to read this work in Greek and we’ll make the most of that opportunity. We’ll begin at the beginning, reading selections from various books, esp. 1, 5, 9, 11, 13, and 22-24. We’ll review the peculiarities of Homeric grammar and vocabulary as we go along.

Texts: W. B. Stanford, Homer: Odyssey 1-12 and Homer: Odyssey 13-24 (Duckworth); R.J. Cunliffe, Lexicon of the Homeric Dialect (Univ. of Oklahoma Press).

The course grade will be comprised of the following: four 1-hr. tests - 40%; quizzes - 25%; quality of class participation - 35%. I welcome suggestions on test formats, class topics, and the like. It’s your class and mine.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

32135 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JGB 2.324

The course is a survey of some of the highlights of Roman civilizationfrom its 8th cent. B.C. beginnings to the so called Fall of the Roman Empire in A.D. 476.  We will look not only at political history, but also at art, literature, architecture, and religion, and we'll pursuesome continuing questions such as: What caused Rome's growth?  How were the Romans able to develop a lasting and stable system of government, which the framers of the American Constitution had very much in mind? Rome, like America, was a mix of different cultures and yet maintained unity in all the diversity--e pluribus unum indeed.  What are some ofthe other parallels between the Roman and the American experience and what are the limits of such analogies?  In addition, we'll look at the genesis of early Christianity within the Roman cultural context of the times.  In so many words, besides acquainting students with a solid factual basis for Roman history, the course will also identify some ofthe abiding issues that have made Roman civilization such a fascinating subject for imitation, admiration, loathing, and anything in betweenfor subsequent generations, right up to our own times. There are no prerequisites for this course. There will be four one-hour exams (half essay, half multiple choice); the one with the lowest grade will count somewhat less than the others.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Texts:

  • A. Kamm, The Romans  (Routledge)
  • Suetonius, Twelve Caesars  (Penguin)
  • R. Fitzgerald tr., Aeneid of Virgil  (Random)
  • G. Vidal, Julian  (Ballantine)
  • Also, Course Packet

LAT 365 • Ovid's Metamorphoses

32570 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as LAT 385)

Ovid’s Metamorphoses is a central work from classical antiquity that has had a huge reception in later literature, art, and music.  In 14 books, Ovid vividly retells and reshapes over 250 myths.  Obvious topics of study are his narrative technique; the organization of the work and the transitions from one story to the next; the relation to earlier versions of these myths; the relation to the Augustan milieu, including Vergil’s Aeneid and arts like wall painting; and the connection with Ovid’s earlier works.  The Metamorphoses is the perfect complement and counterpart to the Aeneid:  a different outlook on myth and the world, and a lot of wit and humor.  We’ll read and study selected passages that illustrate these various aspects.

LAT 385 will meet for an additional hour (tba) to acquaint the graduate students with scholarly issues and research.

Texts include:

W.S. Anderson, ed., Ovid’s Metamorphoses.  Books 1-5

W.S. Anderson, ed., Ovid’s Metamorphoses.  Books 6-10

C C 304C • Greece/Rome: Film & Reality

32355 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 201

Ancient Greece and Rome continue to exist not simply in museums and documentaries but in creative imagination, whether literature, music, the arts, and, since the 20th century, film.  Why? Issues, events, and personalities from the ancient world resonate with ours.  We will analyze and discuss adaptations of Greece and Rome in the cinema in that light (and not to compile a petty list of “mistakes” for each movie).  Our starting point will be a solid grounding in the historical and source material - e.g., what do we know about Trojan War (or the Spartans or Hercules or Julius Caesar) and how?  Then we’ll put ourselves in the roles of the screenwriter and producer: how to select from this material and adapt it so it will appeal to a modern audience (and make money).  What are the limits, what is “authenticity”?  What aspects of these events and the mythological/historical characters were already debated in antiquity?  We are keeping the enrollment to 75 so we can have live and informed discussions every week.

For the 2012 version of the course, which will be updated, see http://www.utexas.edu/courses/ancientfilmCC304/lectures_2012.html

GRADING:

Four exams, emphasis on essays and critical thinking.  Additional individual quality projects are encouraged (i.e. not as substitutes for a blown exam).

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • R. Morkot, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Greece (1996)
  • Homer, The Odyssey, trans. R. Fitzgerald (Farrar/Straus 1998)
  • A. Kamm, The Romans, 2nd ed. (Routledge 2008)
  • W.  Shakespeare, Julius Caesar (Folger Library ed., 2005)

There'll be two course packets, one on the Greek portion of the course, and the other on the Roman.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

LAT 390 • Vergil

32850 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

Vergil’s Aeneid is one of the most multidimensional and layered texts from classical antiquity, engendering a similarly rich reception history - suus cuique Vergilius!  We will look at many of these aspects: historical setting, Vergil’s many innovations in both poetic technique and content, relation to Augustan culture incl. art and architecture, the Aeneid as a (re)construction of Roman cultural memory, and some antique and modern receptions and interpretive trends.  The overall goal, however, in light of the overdue return to a more reasonable length of graduate study, is not to cover even every major aspect of the epic but to use the Aeneid and its many facets as an example of how to open up and carry out research in Roman literature.  Once you do it for this author you should be able to do it for others - on your own. 

GRADING etc.

Emphasis on informed class participation and discussion; reports and one substantial research paper.  3 translation exams, covering 4 books of the Aeneid each.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Vergil OCT (Mynors)

R.D. Williams, ed., The Aeneid of Virgil, Books 1-6, and Books 7-12

 

LAT 323 • Images Of Augustus

33695 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 112

2014 marks the 2,000th anniversary of Augustus’ death.  Love him or hate him (or anything in between), his impact was monumental and shaped Rome, its empire, and culture for centuries to come—not bad for someone who was thrust onto the stage of history before he had time to take his SAT.  A remarkable individual and career, and reactions to him, therefore, were just multi-dimensional as Roman civilization at the time: Augustus was a rich subject for contemporary and later writers.  We’ll use selections from several of these—Livy, Horace, Vergil, Suetonius, Tacitus, and Ovid, to mention only a few—along with inscriptions, incl. the longest one of them all, his Res Gestae.  The course, then, will be good for expanding both your Latin and historical horizons.

Books and readings will include:

A.E. Cooley, Res Gestae Divi Augusti (Cambridge 2009)

K. Galinsky, Augustus: Introduction to the Life of an Emperor (Cambridge 2012)

Course packet with selections from various authors

LAT 365 • Tacitus

33702 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

LAT 365 Seminar in Latin:

Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33580 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM ART 1.102
(also listed as CTI 310)

The course will survey the highlights of Greek civilization and follow the basic format that was revamped last year:

http://www.utexas.edu/courses/introtogreece/cc301/

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

34055 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages.

C C 348 • Values/Leader In Ancient World

33330 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as CTI 375)

Before Flags were instituted at UT, I offered a course on “Leadership and Values in Greece and Rome” several times.

Course objective: discussion of some major Greco-Roman texts from the perspective of leadership and values. I’ll retool the course to meet the requirement that "at least one-third of the course grade must be based on work in practical ethics, i.e., the study of what is involved in making real-life ethical choices."We’ll connect this with the ancient readings, e.g., with reference to Homer: Hector’s dilemma and modern analogies; mass destruction of civilians and the concept of the just war; contingent truths and veracity in everyday life (Odysseus).  Further, the Ajax dilemma (Paul Woodruff’s book); ethics in government (Plato [and “the noble lie”]).  Aeneid:  conflict between the pursuit of happiness and responsibility to a larger group; the ethics of ending a personal relationship (Dido/Aeneas).  Plus the old conundrums of Antigone and Socrates’ trial, and more.  No shortage of material and modern applications, definitely.

Texts:

James M. Burns, Leadership (1978)

Homer, Iliad (transl. R. Fagles)

Plato, Republic (transl. B. Jowett)

Thucydides (transl. R. Warner)

Cicero, Republic and Laws (transl. N. Rudd)

Augustus, Res Gestae (ed. by A. Cooley)

Vergil, Aeneid (transl. R. Fitzgerald)

Selections from P. Woodruff, The Ajax Dilemma (2011)

Grading:

There will be two writing assignments of some 5,000 words each (approx. 10 pages, double-spaced, standard margins).  Students will be required to hand in a draft ahead of time; the draft will NOT count as a separate writing activity. 35% writing assignments; 25% class participation; 40% exams midterm and final

LAT 385 • Aeneid

33755 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as LAT 365)

Our focus will be the second half of Vergil’s Aeneid, Books 7-12 on Aeneas’ war in Italy, which highlight conflict and the poem’s historical context. For various reasons, this half of the Aeneid, which Vergil programmatically calls the “greater opus” (maius opus), is widely neglected.  Scholarship of late has begun to fill that gap and we will evaluate several approaches to the thematics of the poem’s second half.  Besides translating, we will survey and discuss relevant international scholarship.  Emphasis on informed class discussion, reports, and a research paper. 

LAT 385: same as 365, with additional primary and secondary readings.

Texts:

Virgil, R.D. Williams, ed.  The Aeneid of Virgil: Books 7-12 (St. Martin’s)

Course reader with selections from K.W. Gransden, Virgil, Aeneid, Book VIII (Cambridge 1976); P. Hardie, Virgil Aeneid Book IX (Cambridge 1994); S.J. Harrison, Virgil, Aeneid 10 (Oxford 1991); R. Tarrant, Virgil, Aeneid XII (Cambridge 2012); K. Galinsky, Augustan Culture (Princeton 1996)l; and others

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33120 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM ART 1.102

The course is a survey of the highlights of Greek civilization from Homer to the time of Alexander.  We'll look at the various components that comprise Greek culture:  historical and political developments, literature (the Odyssey, some lyric poetry [e.g. Sappho], and tragedies like Aeschylus' Oresteia and Sophocles' Oedipus plays), the arts, architecture, religion, and thought (e.g. Plato's Republic).  This was a lively civilization that changed and interacted greatly with others, such as the ancient near east.  The Greeks are a model not because they were perfect and wonderful, but because they tried to come to grips with and define many political and human issues that are still with us today:  the nature of heroism, the justice or injustice of the world, the proper relation between individual and society, the experiment with democracy, the "classical" style in the arts and architecture, and much more.  The course carries a global flag.   Four exams (50% essay, 50% multiple choice); no final.  There will be review sessions before each test.   Texts: Amos & Lang, These Were the Greeks Homer, Odyssey.  Transl. Fitzgerald (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) Aeschylus, Oresteia  (Penguin) Euripides, Grene, ed. Euripides V  (U of Chicago) Sophocles, Grene, ed.  Sophocles I  (U of Chicago) Aristophanes, Parker, tr.  Lysistrata  (Signet Classics) Plato, Rouse, tr.  Republic  (Signet Classics)

LAT 323 • Elegy

33595 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 1.134

Love elegy was a lively and unique form of Roman poetry that reached its high point in the Augustan age. We will look briefly at its antecedents (Catullus), try to assess the role of Cornelius Gallus, and mostly concentrate on the principal Augustan elegists: Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid (including some elegiac stories from the Metamorphoses). What kind of topics do they start out with, how does their poetry evolve, and are there gender roles in their poetry--these are some of the questions we'll pursue by studying specific and representative poems.

TEXTS: Course Packet S. J. Heyworth and J. Morwood, A Commentary on Propertius, Book 3 (Oxford 2011) P. Murgatroyd, ed., Ovid with Love.  Selections from Ars Amatoria Books 1 and 2 (Chicago 1982)

C C 304C • Greece/Rome: Film And Reality

33045 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.308

The course is a survey of some key events and personalities of ancient Greece and Rome and of their treatment in major European and American films. The weekly movies, which can be accessed on Netflix,  iTunes, etc., will be an integral part of the course. But the emphasis will vary: some will play a larger role in our discussions (half of the Thursday class time is reserved for those) and others will be supplementary to our studying a given period of Greek and Roman history. In neither scenario will the focus be on what the movie did "wrong" and on a laborious list of inaccuracies--these films are not documentaries, but creative adaptations for entertainment. Still, we'll analyze what leads movie producers time and again to return to classical themes (incl. early Christianity), what their slants and intentions are, and what particular challenges these subjects present. The fact is that movies are playing a large role in providing most of the contact many folks have with the ancient world. It's always good to know more about the historical background and what the story really was, and that is much of what this course is about.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

LAT 383 • Age Of Augustus

33479 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

The seminar will be a synoptic study of the main components of Augustan culture:  political and social history, the arts and architecture, literature, and religion.  Overcoming traditional compartmentalizations will be one goal.  Another, related one, is to get away from the schematic concepts and dichotomies that have commonly been applied to the Augustan age.  Despite some nonpareil recent scholarship on the period, there "is still work to be done" (R. Syme). The issues are complex and will require competent research.  A good working knowledge, therefore, of a least one modern language will be the sine qua non for any participants.  Emphasis will be on informed discussion, articulate reports, and a solid paper.  Subjects covered will depend to some extent on the interests of the members of the seminar.  No auditors. Texts: R. Syme, The Roman Revolution P. Zanker, The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus K. Galinsky, Augustan Culture A.E. Cooley, ed.,  Res Gestae Divi Augusti OCT's of Vergil, Horace, Course Packet

 

Cross-listed with C C 383 

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

33275 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316

The course is a survey of some of the highlights of Roman civilizationfrom its 8th cent. B.C. beginnings to the so called Fall of the Roman Empire in A.D. 476.  We will look not only at political history, but also at art, literature, architecture, and religion, and we'll pursuesome continuing questions such as: What caused Rome's growth?  How were the Romans able to develop a lasting and stable system of government, which the framers of the American Constitution had very much in mind? Rome, like America, was a mix of different cultures and yet maintained unity in all the diversity--e pluribus unum indeed.  What are some ofthe other parallels between the Roman and the American experience and what are the limits of such analogies?  In addition, we'll look at the genesis of early Christianity within the Roman cultural context of the times.  In so many words, besides acquainting students with a solid factual basis for Roman history, the course will also identify some ofthe abiding issues that have made Roman civilization such a fascinating subject for imitation, admiration, loathing, and anything in betweenfor subsequent generations, right up to our own times. There are no prerequisites for this course. This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective. There will be four one-hour exams (half essay, half multiple choice); the one with the lowest grade will count somewhat less than the others.

Texts:

  • A. Kamm, The Romans  (Routledge)
  • Suetonius, Twelve Caesars  (Penguin)
  • R. Fitzgerald tr., Aeneid of Virgil  (Random)
  • G. Vidal, Julian  (Ballantine)
  • Also, Course Packet

LAT 365 • Seneca

33735 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 2.102

In recent years, the younger Seneca has undergone something of a renaissance and has found an enthusiastic readership that extends well beyond those scholars with philosophical interests.  Indeed, Seneca might now be regarded as one of the most widely-studied and written-about Imperial Latin writers.  As such, he is an author with whom students of Latin literature and Roman culture should have some acquaintance.  In this course, we will focus on two of Seneca’s most gripping and influential tragedies, the Medea and the Thyestes.  We will also devote some time to the Pseudo-Senecan Octavia.

The course has three related aims: to examine how Seneca dealt with imperial power; to explore Seneca’s distinctive modes of thought and expression; and to improve each student's ability to be an informed and discerning reader of Latin. In addition to reading substantial amounts of prepared Latin during each class meeting, we will learn to scan Senecan verse and discuss a selection of recent secondary scholarship on Senecan drama and its influence on later literary traditions.  Latin assignments will range from approximately 40 lines of Latin early in the course to 75 lines by the end of the semester.  We will not translate all prepared Latin during class meetings. 

This course carries a Writing flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

The final grade will be composed of: class participation and preparation (10%); in-class presentation (10%); 2 midterm examinations (35%); comprehensive final exam (25%); and a 10-12 pp scholarly research paper (20%).

 

Texts:

H.M. Hine, Seneca: Medea (Aris & Phillips, 2000).  978-0856686924.
R.J. Tarrant, Seneca’s Thyestes (1985).  978-0891308713.
E.F. Watling, Four Tragedies and Octavia (Penguin Classics, 1966).  978-0140441741.

C C 304C • Greece/Rome: Film And Reality

32490 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GRG 424
(also listed as EUS 307)

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

GK 312K • Sec-Yr Gk II: Selected Writers

32715 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 208

Continuation of Greek 311. Extensive selections of Greek prose and/or poetry. Class meetings will be devoted especially to translation, grammar and syntax, and secondarily to discussion of the texts in their cultural context.

Greek 312K and 312L may not both be counted.

Prerequisites Greek 311 with a grade of at least C.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

32760 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 385 • Ovid

33295 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

32615 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCH 1.120

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 365 • Ovid's Metamorphoses

33130 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CBA 4.340

LAT 365 Seminar in Latin:

Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

C C 304C • Greece/Rome: Film And Reality

33090 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CAL 100

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT 383 • Vergil's Aeneid

33617 • Fall 2007
Meets WF 10:00AM-11:30AM SZB 434

LAT 383 Graduate Reading:

Topics given in recent years include Latin prose, Seneca, and Augustine's Confessions.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

31920 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 1.308

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 348 • Values/Leadrshp In Anc World-W

32000 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 304C • Greece/Rome: Film And Reality

32620 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CAL 100

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

GK 311 • Sec-Yr Gk I: Prose And Poetry

32860 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 112

Continuation of Greek 601C or 507. Introductory readings from classical authors such as Lysias, Plato, and Xenophon. Includes grammar review.

Prerequisites: Greek 601C or 507 with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each.

C C 304C • Greece/Rome: Film And Reality

30505 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ 1.306

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT 323 • Cicero

31018 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

29625 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM FAC 21

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 324 • Adv Latin Grammar & Compositn

30150 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 112

This course will provide an intensive review of Latin grammar, morphology and syntax as well as an introduction to the fundamental elements of Latin prose style across a range of genres and periods.  It will be assumed that the student has a good, general grasp of Latin syntax and morphology.  Students registered for Latin 324 must have taken AT LEAST 4 semesters of Latin and, preferably, also at least one upper division Latin prose course at the University of Texas.  Please note that this course will be extremely challenging if you have no experience in reading extended passages of Latin prose.  No previous experience in prose composition is necessary for success in this course; you must, however, be willing to attend class regularly, participate, and prepare the assigned compositions and readings if you expect to do well.   Class meetings will be devoted to discussions of Latin grammar, syntax, and style; review of weekly assignments; and the close reading of extended prose passages.

LAT 323 • Vergil's Eclogues And Georgics

30790 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

LAT 383 • Age Of Augustus

30825 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

LAT 383 Graduate Reading:

Topics given in recent years include Latin prose, Seneca, and Augustine's Confessions.

LAT 365 • Vergil's Aeneid, Bks Vii-Xii

28930 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 112

LAT 365 Seminar in Latin:

Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

29000 • Spring 2004
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM WAG 10

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

28720 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 21

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 385 • Ovid's Metamorphoses

29320 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

27970 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 365 • Horace

28510 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 112

LAT 365 Seminar in Latin:

Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

28580 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 4.114

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

LAT 385 • Vergil's Aeneid

29075 • Fall 2002
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM BAT 107

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

C C 301 • Ancient Greece

28095 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WEL 3.502

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 383 • Roman Religion

28305 • Spring 2002
Meets MW 1:30PM-3:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as LAT 390)

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

C C 348 • Values/Leadrshp In Anc World-W

28980 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 208
(also listed as HIS 350L)

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT F386 • Conference Course In Latin Lit

82900 • Summer 2001

May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

C C 302 • Introduction To Ancient Rome

28455 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM FAC 21

This course provides an introductory-level survey of the history of Rome from its origins in the Iron Age (c. 800 BC) to its sack by the Gothic general Alaric in August 410 AD.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

29100 • Spring 2001
Meets MW 1:30PM-3:00PM WAG 10

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

LAT 383 • Age Of Augustus

28455 • Spring 2000
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM WAG 10

LAT 383 Graduate Reading:

Topics given in recent years include Latin prose, Seneca, and Augustine's Confessions.

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

28490 • Spring 2000
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM WAG 10

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

Books


1) Aeneas, Sicily, and Rome (Princeton University Press 1969), pp. xxvi and 278, with 88 plates. 2nd printing 1971.

 

2) Ed., Albii Tibulli aliorumque carminum libri tres, 3rd ed. (Brill, Leiden, 1971) (with F. W. Lenz).

 

3)  The Herakles Theme.  The Adaptations of the Hero in Literature from Homer to the Twentieth Century  
(Blackwell, Oxford, 1972), pp. xvi and 317 with 16 plates.

 

4)  Ed., Perspectives on Roman Poetry.  A Classics Symposium (University of Texas Press, Austin and London, 1974), pp. 160.

 

5)  Ovid's Metamorphoses.  An Introduction to the Basic Aspects (Oxford [Blackwell] and University of California Press, 1975), pp. xii and 285.

 

6)  Ed., The Interpretation of Roman Poetry.  Empiricism or Hermeneutics? (Peter Lang, Frankfurt/New York 1992), pp. xi and 254.

 

7)  Classical and Modern Interactions.  Postmodern architecture, multiculturalism, decline, and other issues  (Univ. of Texas Press 1992).  
Pp. 204. Based on Phi Beta Kappa Lectures. 

 

8)  Augustan Culture.  An interpretive introduction (Princeton Univ. Press 1996), pp. xi and 474,  with 173 illustrations and 8 color plates;  
rev. paperback ed. 1998. 3rd printing 2007.

 

9)  Ed., The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus (Cambridge Univ. Press 2005), pp. xxvii and 408, with 5 maps, 61 ills., and 8 color plates.  2nd printing 2007.

 

10) Augustus: introduction to the life of an emperor (Cambridge U.P. 2012), pp. xxiv and 200, with 3 maps and 22 ills. Available in various formats, incl. Kindle and eBook.
German translation: Augustus. Sein Leben als Kaiser (Philipp von Zabern Verlag 2013).

 

11) Ed., Memoria Romana: Memory in Rome and Rome in Memory. Suppl. vol. 10 of Memoirs of the American Academy
in Rome
 (Ann Arbor 2014), pp. 212 with 38 ills. and 4 color plates.

 

12) Ed. (with Kenneth Lapatin),  Cultural Memories in the Roman Empire (Getty Museum Publications, Dec. 2015), pp. 376 with 140 ills.

 

13) Ed.,  Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (Oxford Univ. Press [England], Jan. 2016), pp. 448 with 25 ills.

 

 

 

Modified July 4, 2015

 

 

Publications


BOOKS.

Augustus: introduction to the life of an emperor (Cambridge U.P. 2012). 
German translation: Augustus. Sein Leben als Kaiser (Philipp von Zabern 2013).

Ed., Memoria Romana: Memory in Rome and Rome in Memory. Suppl. vol. 10 of Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome (Ann Arbor 2014).

Ed., Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (Oxford U. P., Jan. 2016).

Ed. with K. Lapatin, Cultural Memories in the Roman Empire (Getty Publications, Dec. 2015).

 

CHAPTERS:.

“Greece and Rome in the Cinema,” in C. Kallendorf, ed., The Blackwell Guide to the Classical Tradition (Oxford 2007) 393-407.

“The long reign: religion in the Augustan semi-century,” in J. Rüpke, ed., The Blackwell Companion to the Ancient World: Roman Religion (Oxford 2007) 71-82.

"Herod and the Augustan Cultural Revolution," in D. Jacobson, ed., Herod and Augustus (Leiden 2008), 29-42.

“The Cult of the Roman Emperor: Uniter or Divider,” in J. Brodd  and J. Reed. eds.,  Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult (Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta  2011) 1-21.

“In the Shadow (or Not) of the Imperial Cult: A Cooperative Agenda,” in J. Brodd  and J. Reed.,
  eds., Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult (Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta
  2011) 215-25

“Actium” and “Augustus”, Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception (Berlin/NY, 2009/11), 1.290-1, 3.104-110.

“Hercules,” in G. Most, A. Grafton, and S. Settis, eds., The Classical Tradition (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press 2010) 426-9.

“La costruzione del mito augusteo: some construction elements,” in M. Labate and 
        G. Rosati, eds, La costruzione del mito augusteo (Heidelberg 2013) 29-47.

“Roman Imperial Religion,” in The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology
         (Oxford 2013) 259-64.

“Introduction” to Memoria Romana (2014) 1-12.

"Introduction" to Cultural Memories in the Roman Empire (2015) 1-22.

"Introduction" to Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016).

 

ARTICLES:

“Recarved Imperial Portraits:  Nuances and Wider Context,” Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome 52 (2008) 1-25.

“Aeneas at Cumae,” Vergilius 55 (2009) 69-87.

Various entries for the Harvard Virgil Encyclopedia (2014).

“Erinnerungskultur des Augustus - die Inszenierung der Trauer und seiner unsterblichen 
       memoria,” Antike Welt (2014/04) 25-33.

“Augustus' Auctoritas and Res Gestae 34.3,” Hermes 143.2 (2015) 244-249.

 

REVIEWS:

J. Osgood, Caesar’s Legacy (Cambridge 2006) in Journ. of Roman Archaeology 21 (2008) 405-9.

Censorinus, The Birthday Book, transl. Holt Parker (Chicago 2007) in Times Higher Ed. Supplement (April 6, 2007) 24.

P. Rehak, Imperium and Cosmos.  Augustus and the Northern Campus Martius (Madison 2006), AJA 112 (2008) 193-4.

M. Schauer, Aeneas dux in Vergils Aeneis, Zetemata 128 (Munich 2007) in Bryn Mawr Class. Reviews 2008.06.29.

C. Ando, The Matter of the Gods.  Religion in the Roman Empire (Berkeley and L.A.  2008), Classical World 103.2 (2010) 263-4.

M. Beard, The Roman Triumph (Cambridge, Mass. 2007), Class. Philology 104 (2009) 248-52.

K. Riley, The reception and performance of Euripides’ Herakles: reasoning madness (Oxford UP 2008),  Journal Hell. Studies 129 (2009) 263-4.

A. Powell, Virgil the Partisan (Swansea 2008), Gnomon 82 (2010) 97-9.

A.E. Cooley, Res Gestae Divi Augusti (Cambridge 2009), Classical Review 61 (2010) 129-31.

M. Lowrie, Writing, Performance, and Authority in Augustan Rome (Oxford UP 2009), Journal of Roman Archaeology 24 (2011) 556-60.

A. Spawforth, Greece and the Augustan Cultural Revolution (Cambridge 2012), Classical Journal on-line 2012.09.02.

W. Dahlheim, Augustus (Munich 2010), Gnomon 86 (2014) 337-40.

R. von den Hoff, W. Stroh and M. Zimmermann, Divus Augustus. Der erste römiasche Kaiser und seine Welt, Klio (2015).

Recent Lectures & Programs


Lectures:

"Are We Rome - Really?" Brown Symposium on "Imperium," Southwestern Univ., Feb. 2010

"The self-representation of the Roman emperor: pontifexdivus and civilis princeps," Keynote lecture, Intern. Conference on "Icon and Idol," Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, June 16, 2010

"Constructions of the imperial cult in current NT scholarship," Intern. Conference on "The Cult of the Roman Emperor," Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Sept. 23, 2010

Chair and respondent, panel on "Memory in Greco-Roman and Christian Religion," Annual SBL Meeting, Atlanta, Nov. 20-22, 2010

"Back to basics," Keynote at Conference on Vergilian criticism, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Nov. 26-27, 2010

"Memoria in Rome: realities and theory," Univ. of Athens, December 7, 2010

"Napoleon - ein zweiter Augustus?", Bundeskunsthalle, Bonn, March 29, 2011, in connection with exhibition "Napoleon und Europa: Traum und Trauma."

"La costruzione del mito augusteo: a look at the construction site," Keynote at Conference on "La costruzione del mito augusteo", Univ. of Udine (Italy), June 9, 2011

Chair, panel on "Nero in Christian, Jewish, and Roman Memory," Annual SBL Meeting, San Francisco, Nov. 22, 2011

Organization of and introduction to panels at annual meeting of Society of Biblical Literature “Conversion of Religious Landscapes”
and “Nero in Roman, Jewish, and Christian Memory” (Nov. 2011)

Two-day workshop with Ph. D. students in Religious Studies at Baylor University and public lecture
“Why God chose the time of Augustus for the birth of Christ” (Jan. 2012)

Two workshops for grantees in Max-Planck Award project: Rome (Oct. 2011) and Austin (April 2012)

"Die Konstruktion des Augustus-Mythos: Aspekte seiner Genese," Univ. of Cologne, Nov. 2012

"Vergils Aeneis as Experiment und Wagnis," Univ. of Konstanz and Freiburg, Dec. 2012

"Abandonment and Renewal in the Ancient World: it's all a matter of memory," Keynote, graduate student conference on "Abandonment and
Renewal in the Ancient World," Univ. of Michigan Classics Department, Feb. 2013

"Heracles for all ages: a triptych," Keynote, intern. conference on Heracles and his reception, Univ. of Leeds, June 2013

"Approaches to memory in ancient Rome: theory and practice," Keynote, intern. conference on "City and Symbol of Rome,"
Univ. of Leiden, Oct. 2013

"Augustus", Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series, Univ. of Mary Washington, VA, Feb. 2014

"Augustus in 2014," concluding address intern. conference, Leeds, U.K., August 2014

"Memory and Forgetting in the Age of Augustus," Todd Memorial Lecture, Sydney, Sept. 2014

"Succession of Memories in the Time of Augustus," Keynote, graduate student conference on "A Game of Thrones: Succession in the Ancient World," University of Virginia Classics Dept., April 2015

 

International conferences organized, incl. introduction and responses to papers:

"Memoria Romana - Functions of Memory in Rome," April 2010 (UT Austin)

"Memory and Roman Culture", Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Nov. 12-14, 2010

"Memory in Rome and Rome in Memory," Amer. Academy in Rome, Oct. 14-16, 2011

"Religious Pluralism in Europe and Asia," University of Texas at Austin, Sept. 2012

"Cultural Memories in the Roman Empire," Getty Villa Museum, Malibu, CA, April 2013

Dissertation Advice


 

Karl GalinskyForeword: given my experience mostly with dissertations in the arts and humanities, my advice is directed primarily at students in these areas though it may be selectively useful to others, too:

1) Keep it in perspective. To appropriate the title of a current dating service for busy professionals ("It's Just Lunch"): it's just a dissertation, and not a book. I'm saying this for several reasons. To begin with, American universities are a hybrid of the British model at the undergraduate level, and the German model at the graduate level. In Germany, it was--and to some extent still is--obligatory to have the dissertation published. Alas, dissertations read, well, like dissertations. And do not expect university presses to beat down your door eagerly to partake in the fruits of your research; in fact, most American university presses have cut down drastically on publishing books that, even with the professed "revisions" still quack like dissertations.

This does not mean that a good book can't originate with a dissertation. Some do, but that's a different project. You write the dissertation to validate your credentials of being an effective and knowledgeable member of your profession. It's a springboard for further exploration of the field, a beginning rather than a culminating achievement. The extraordinary length to which graduate study and dissertation writing have ballooned have kind of anchored the latter notion. That's just as false as the equally entrenched notion that tenure is the pinnacle instead of being a promissory note for further productive activity.

2) A dissertation is a work in progress. It's the process of discovery that matters. Yes, you should have a well thought-out conceptual framework and not simply write as you go along. But be wary of the pitfalls of a thesis. Thesis too often can mean that you're trying to straighten out the messiness of any kind of human experience and make it fit into tidy academic compartments. Whatever may contradict the thesis then tends to be given short shrift. True to human life, of course, most topics are more complex. So don't be afraid to change course along the way. The voyage is more rewarding than the destination.

3) To combine (1) and (2): no, your dissertation will not be the final word. As early as two weeks after handing it in, you may already have second thoughts about some of your conclusions. Good. Our perspectives evolve both per se and in the light of new evidence. Some of the best scholars revisit topics on which they have written and that's a sign of maturity, and not of flip-flopping.

4) Don't be afraid to take on a big topic to begin with. As you proceed, you'll have to concentrate on one aspect or the other, but the bigger picture should always be in sight.

5) The real choice is not what to put in, but what to leave out. As I said earlier, a dissertation is an essay in the original sense of the word, i.e. an attempt or enterprise rather than an encyclopedic, alpha-to-omega package. Once you reach page 240 and have demonstrated some good insights, stop and finish up. The material you are not using may exceed the material you are using: here is the material for your next articles, or, if you must, the expansion of the dissertation into a book for an audience that is larger than your dissertation committee.

6) As for the committee, stay in frequent touch with all of its members. Make sure to make this into a good experience for all concerned, including yourself: a shared dialogue and shared excitement at new discoveries and original perspectives.

7) Move along at a good pace. Dissertations don't always get better the longer you work on them. In fact, you may run out of gas and that's a drag for everyone involved. Keep the topic manageable and don't worry about not being able to say it all. Quality matters, not quantity, and you can always point out how your particular approach will be applicable to topics and areas not covered in your dissertation.