Department of Classics

Ingrid M Edlund-Berry


Professor Emeritus

Professor Emerita
Ingrid M Edlund-Berry

Contact

Interests


Etruscan and Italian archaeology and culture

Biography


Interests:  From Hut to Palace: The significance of Etruscan, Greek, and Roman architectural traditions in ancient Italy; Etruscan and Republican mouldings in a historical and cultural context; Landscape and sacred places in ancient Italy

Fields: Etruscan and Italian archaeology and culture 

Fieldwork: Murlo/Poggio Civitate, Tuscany; Metaponto, Basilicata; Poggio Colla, Tuscany; Morgantina, Sicily

Recent Publications: "Early Rome and the Making of 'Roman' Identity through Architecture and City Planning," in A Companion to the Archaeology of the Roman Republic, ed. Jane DeRose Evans, Blackwell, Oxford 2013, 406-425.

"Religion: The Gods and the Places," in The Etruscan World, ed. Jean M. Turfa, Routledge, London 2013, 557-565.

"The architectural heritage of Etruria," in The Etruscan World, ed. Jean M. Turfa, Routledge, London 2013, 695-707.

”Central Italy: Etrusco-Italic Sanctuaries,” in Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology, ed. Claire Smith, New York 2014,  1234-1247.

”La langage de l’architecture dans la céramique étrusque peinte: définition d’une identité culturelle,” in  Les potiers d’Étrurie et leur monde: contacts, échanges, transferts, eds. Laura Ambrosini and Vincent Jolivet, Paris 2014, 285-295.

”Archaeological Evidence for Roman Identity in Ancient Italy,” in Attitudes towads the Past in Antiquity. Creating Identities. Proceedings of an International Conference held at Stockholm University, 15-17 May 2009 (Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 14), eds. Brita Alroth and Charlotte Scheffer, Stockholm 2014, 163-172.

"Från Ardea till Deliciae Fictiles: Arvid Andréns pionjärgärning inom svensk antikforskning, in Svensk Antikforskning vid Medelhavet (Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademin, Konferenser 87), ed. Frederick Whitling, Stockholm 2014, 65-69.

”Attitudes towards the past in antiquity: Creating Identities,” in Attitudes towards the Past in Antiquity. Creating Identities. Proceedings of an International Conference held at Stockholm University, 15-17 May 2009 (Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 14), edited by Brita Alroth and Charlotte Scheffer, Stockholm 2014, 321-325.

"Etruscans," "Piacenza Liver," and "Uni," in The Routledge Encyclopedia of Ancient Mediterranean Religions, ed. Eric Orlin et al., Routledge, New York and London, 2016, 317-319, 722, 977.

"Italic Animal Votive Terracottas," "Impasto and Bucchero Pottery," "Italic Votive Vessels," "A Note on Miscellaneous Italian Ware," in The Collection of Antiquities of the American Academy in Rome, eds. Larissa Bonfante and Helen Nagy, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2015, 216-219, 245-258, 283-287, 314.

 

 

 

Courses


LAT F311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

83645 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 204

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

C C 340 • People & Places Of Anc Italy-W

32710 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT S312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

83730 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 101

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312.

C C 340 • People & Places Of Anc Italy-W

32675 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM WAG 112

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

C C 340 • People & Places Of Anc Italy-W

31045 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT 398T • Supervised Teaching In Latin

30215 • Spring 2005
Meets MW 9:00AM-11:00AM UTC 1.142

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to methods of teaching, especially introductory and intermediate Latin classes. Topics will include planning the course and devising the syllabus, presenting lessons, assigning and evaluating homework, making up and grading quizzes and exams, and other matters of importance.

Grading will be based on class participation and a number of projects.

C C 340 • Archaeology Of Ancient Italy

30335 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 101

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT F311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

83025 • Summer 2004
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 308

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

LAT 323 • Livy

28925 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 208

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C S303 • Classical Mythology

82920 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM WAG 214

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 340 • Archaeology Of Ancient Italy

28020 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

C C 380 • Roman Archaeology

28130 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

C C 380 Seminar in Classical Archaeology:

Topics given in recent years include methods and theory, Greek and Roman Naples, landscape archaeology, and Hellenistic and Roman Egypt.

C C 340 • Etruscan Archaeology-W

28545 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

C C S303 • Classical Mythology

83060 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM WAG 201

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 340 • People & Places Of Anc Italy-W

28175 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

C C 340 • Archaeology Of Ancient Italy

28940 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

LAT S507 • First-Year Latin II

82950 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WAG 208

This course is a continuation of Latin 506.  It has two main aims:  to increase the student's fluency in Latin through reading and close examination of grammar and syntax, and to introduce students to Roman life and culture.

There will be daily assignments from Wheelock’s Latin, including review of Chapters 1-27 and a careful study of Chapters 27-40.  This will be supplemented by further connected readings from Caesar’s Gallic Wars.

Prerequisites:  Completion of Latin 506 or the equivalent with a grade of C or higher.

Latin 507 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Intermediate Latin (Latin 311 and 312), where they will read selections from Vergil, Cicero, and other authors

C C 380 • Roman Archaeology

28635 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

C C 380 Seminar in Classical Archaeology:

Topics given in recent years include methods and theory, Greek and Roman Naples, landscape archaeology, and Hellenistic and Roman Egypt.

C C 303 • Classical Mythology

28950 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 101

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT S386 • Conference Course In Latin Lit

83010 • Summer 2000

May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

C C 340 • Archaeology Of Italy

27910 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

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