Department of Classics

John H Kroll


Professor Emeritus

Contact

Interests


Greek Archaeology and History, Numismatics

Biography


FieldsGreek Archaeology and History, Numismatics

Courses


AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

30880-30895 • Spring 2006
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 201

AHC 325 Topics in Ancient History:

Topics in the history of the Greek and Roman empires and the surrounding area.

C C 340 • Heroes/Villains In Greek Lit-W

31035 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 208

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

GK 311 • Sec-Yr Gk I: Prose And Poetry

30750 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 112

Continuation of Greek 601C or 507. Introductory readings from classical authors such as Lysias, Plato, and Xenophon. Includes grammar review.

Prerequisites: Greek 601C or 507 with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each.

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

29515-29530 • Spring 2005
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 201

AHC 325 Topics in Ancient History:

Topics in the history of the Greek and Roman empires and the surrounding area.

C C 380 • Greek Archaeology Survey

29765 • Spring 2005
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:30PM WAG 10

C C 380 Seminar in Classical Archaeology:

Topics given in recent years include methods and theory, Greek and Roman Naples, landscape archaeology, and Hellenistic and Roman Egypt.

C C 340 • Greek Archaeology Survey-W

30342 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

30505 • Fall 2004
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

28385 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 1

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

C C 340 • Greek Archaeology Survey-W

28805 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112

C C 340 Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology:

Detailed study of topics such as architecture, sculpture, or topography of sites. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

28975 • Fall 2003
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

C C S340 • Greek Art And Archaeology

82935 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 101

The vibrant history of Egypt did not end when it was conquered by Alexander the Great in 332 BCE. Rather, the rich traditions of Pharaonic Egypt came together with the customs and culture of her Greek and, later, Roman conquerors to create a complex and lively society that incorporated the religious, economic, and personal practices of both native Egyptian and Mediterranean peoples. In this course, we will explore the archaeological and historical evidence for life in Egypt between 332 BCE and 324 CE when the transformation of the Roman Empire ushered in the Late Antique era, marking significant changes in Egypt, as in the rest of the Roman Empire. Using primary documents, mainly papyri, and archaeological sites and objects, we will examine the role of Egypt’s new rulers and the religious beliefs, daily life, and burial practices of everyday people, including women and children. In doing so, we will explore the ways that Egypt’s rich Pharaonic heritage persisted in the face of foreign rule and the new forms of art and architecture that emerged from sustained contact between Egypt and the culture of her new rulers.

Required:

Livia Capponi, Roman Egypt. Classical World Series. London: Bristol Classical Press, 2010. ISBN 9781853997266.

Rowlandson, Jane (ed). Women and Society in Greek and Roman Egypt: A Sourcebook. Cambridge University Press. 1998. 978-0521588157

Corbelli, Judith. The Art of Death in Graeco-Roman Egypt. Shire Publications. 2006. 978-0747806479

Ellis, Simon. Graeco-Roman Egypt. Shire Publications. 2008. 978-0747801580.

Recommended:

Shaw, Ian. Ancient Egypt: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press. 2004. 978-0192854193

C C 380 • Greek Archaeology Survey

28285 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112

C C 380 Seminar in Classical Archaeology:

Topics given in recent years include methods and theory, Greek and Roman Naples, landscape archaeology, and Hellenistic and Roman Egypt.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

29160 • Fall 2001
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

C C S340 • Greek Art And Archaeology

82630 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 201

The vibrant history of Egypt did not end when it was conquered by Alexander the Great in 332 BCE. Rather, the rich traditions of Pharaonic Egypt came together with the customs and culture of her Greek and, later, Roman conquerors to create a complex and lively society that incorporated the religious, economic, and personal practices of both native Egyptian and Mediterranean peoples. In this course, we will explore the archaeological and historical evidence for life in Egypt between 332 BCE and 324 CE when the transformation of the Roman Empire ushered in the Late Antique era, marking significant changes in Egypt, as in the rest of the Roman Empire. Using primary documents, mainly papyri, and archaeological sites and objects, we will examine the role of Egypt’s new rulers and the religious beliefs, daily life, and burial practices of everyday people, including women and children. In doing so, we will explore the ways that Egypt’s rich Pharaonic heritage persisted in the face of foreign rule and the new forms of art and architecture that emerged from sustained contact between Egypt and the culture of her new rulers.

Required:

Livia Capponi, Roman Egypt. Classical World Series. London: Bristol Classical Press, 2010. ISBN 9781853997266.

Rowlandson, Jane (ed). Women and Society in Greek and Roman Egypt: A Sourcebook. Cambridge University Press. 1998. 978-0521588157

Corbelli, Judith. The Art of Death in Graeco-Roman Egypt. Shire Publications. 2006. 978-0747806479

Ellis, Simon. Graeco-Roman Egypt. Shire Publications. 2008. 978-0747801580.

Recommended:

Shaw, Ian. Ancient Egypt: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press. 2004. 978-0192854193

C C 319D • Ancient Mediterranean World

28990-29005 • Fall 2000
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as HIS 319D)

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

Carries the Global Cultures and Writing flags.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 383 • Survey Of Greek History

29270 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

Greek Literature Survey

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence surveying the major forms and genres of Greek literature from the Archaic through Classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. As in the first half, we’ll proceed mainly in chronological order, beginning with oratory and rhetoric in the fifth century BCE, moving on to historiography, philosophy, and Hellenistic poetry, and ending with Imperial literature from the second century CE. Most of our time and effort will be devoted to reading and analyzing representative selections by some of the more influential authors in these areas and periods. Readings will include large helpings of Greek, additional reading in translation, and critical commentary and scholarship.

The survey has multiple overlapping goals:

  • Strengthen and refine reading and translating skills: speed, accuracy, precision, etc.
  • Sharpen critical and analytical skills through exercises in close reading informed by recent scholarship and related resources.
  • Survey classical and later Greek literature in its various forms and genres, including how they developed and interacted over time.
  • Close study of representative examples of these forms and genres from each period.
  • Practice methods and techniques for developing and articulating an informed critical response to your reading, both orally and in writing.

The survey is also designed to help students prepare for the doctoral exams in literature, not as a glorified crib-sheet but by fostering the skills and core knowledge required for teaching and scholarship in Classics – precisely what the exams are meant to promote and assess. There is of course far more to Greek literature than we can explore here, but the survey will help students to develop both a global map of the wider terrain and the critical skills and resources to broaden and deepen that knowledge as they advance through the program and beyond.

Forms and periods covered include Classical prose (oratory, historiography, philosophy), New Comedy, Hellenistic poetry (including hymn, elegy, pastoral, epigram), and Imperial prose (including biography, novel, satire). Readings will be drawn from Antiphon, Gorgias, Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Menander, Callimachus, Aratus, Theocritus, Plutarch, Longus, Lucian, and others.

Grading: participation 10%, sight translation 20%, passage commentaries 25%, essays 35%

There is no final exam. In its place, the written portion of the doctoral exam in Greek Literature will be offered in two parts near the end of the semester:

   1) take-home portion over a weekend before the end of classes

   2) two essays at the scheduled final exam period

See  http://www.utexas.edu/cola/classics/graduate/admissions/exam-prompts/lit-written.php

C C 301 • Ancient Greece

27820 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 101

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

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