Department of Classics

Paula J Perlman


ProfessorPhD 1984, The University of California, Berkeley

Professor and Graduate Adviser
Paula J Perlman

Contact

Interests


Greek history of the Archaic and Classical periods, Greek historiography, ancient law, ancient religion, Greek epigraphy

Biography


Fields: Epigraphy, Greek History and Religion

Courses Taught

Fall semester 2008: Graduate Survey of Greek History; Attic Prose and Athenian Society

Spring semester 2009: History of Greece 404-246 B.C.; Writing Ancient History Today.

Recent Publications

2005. "Imagining Crete." In M. H. Hansen (ed.) The Imaginary Polis. Acts of the Copenhagen Polis Centre vol. 7, 282-334. Copenhagen.

2005. "Crete," in M. H. Hansen and S. Hornblower, Inventory of the Greek Poleis, 1144-1195. Oxford.

2004. "Writing on the Walls. The Architectural Context of Archaic Cretan Laws," in Crete Beyond the Palaces: Proceedings of the Crete 2000 Conference, 181-197. Philadelphia.

2004. "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor. The Economies of Archaic Eleutherna, Crete," Classical Antiquity 23: 95-136.

2002. "Gortyn. The First Seven-Hundred Years. Part II. The Laws from the Temple of Apollo Pythios," in Nielsen, T. (ed.), Papers of the Copenhagen Polis Centre, 6, 187- 227. Stuttgart.

2002. "The Cretan Colonists of Sicily: Prosopography, Onomastics, and Myths of Colonization," Cretan Studies 7: 177- 211

2000. "Gortyn: the First 700 Years. Part I," in Flensted-Jensen, P., Nielsen, T. H. and L. Rubenstein (eds.), Polis and Politics. Studies in Ancient Greek History, 59-89. Copenhagen.

Courses


AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32780-32795 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures and Writing flags.

This course fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 311 • Intermediate Greek I

33125 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 112

Continuation of Greek 601C or 507. Introductory readings from classical authors such as Lysias, Plato, and Xenophon. Includes grammar review.

Prerequisites: Greek 601C or 507 with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each.

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32015-32030 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.126
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures and Writing flags.

This course fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32020-32035 • Fall 2015
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures and Writing flags.

This course fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

AHC 378 • Writing Ancient Hist Today

32265 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

Writing Ancient History Today

In the past twenty years or so, the focus of much of the research into ancient history has shifted from political/military history to social/economic/cultural history. At the same time, the sources available to the ancient historian are much the same today as they were twenty years ago. Thus, ancient historians must ask new questions of the sources and develop new methods for their study of them. This course is designed to introduce students who already have some background in ancient Greek history to the questions that engage ancient historians today and to the methods that they use.

Our focus will be the archaic Greek world (ca. 750-475 B.C.). The structure of the class will be problem-oriented (a selection of key topics and problems rather than a historical survey). We will explore the full range of evidence used by today’s ancient historian: literary, documentary (inscriptions and papyri), the material record as documented through archaeological excavation and survey, and ancient landscape and environmental studies.

Among the topics that we will consider are:

  • assessing Greek colonization in the post-colonial world
  • the bully pulpit: public discourse and democratic ideology in ancient Athens
  • ‘orientalizing’ and ‘hellenizing’ in elite Athenian society
  • literacy and the early Greek polis: the impact of writing on the early state
  • how different was archaic Spartan society (or, what’s normative about archaic Athens?)

The class will be conducted as a seminar with student participation central to its success.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

33080-33095 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures and Writing flags.

This course fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 383 • Greek History Survey

33390 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

This course has several objectives:

1. to prepare Ph.D. students for the Qualifying Exam in Greek History, which will form the Final Examination of the seminar itself;

2. to master a narrative of Greek history of the Archaic and Classical periods;

3. to explore the claims of competing narratives through a close study of key topics (sources, methods, approaches);

4. to identify key themes.

Attention will be paid to social, economic and intellectual history of the ancient Greeks, as well as political and military history. Class sessions will combine lectures, short student presentations, and discussion. Sealey (available on Blackboard), Osborne, and Hornblower will provide the basic narrative framework. Sealey covers the period 700-338, Osborne the period 1200-479, and Hornblower the period 479-338. It will be useful to compare Sealey and Osborne/Hornblower. We will pursue the third and fourth objectives through the examination of topics and problems including e.g.:

1.  polis and ethnos, origins

2.  the development of the Spartan taxis

3.  asty and chora, the unification of Attica

4.  Persian Wars and Greek nationalism: rhetoric and iconography

5.  Thucydides and the Athenian Empire

6.  the philosophers as historical sources: Aristotles' politeiai

7.  experiments in federalism: the Boiotian League

8.  utopianism in the late Classical period

9.  how the Greeks organized their past

Particular attention will be paid to the nature and evaluation of the sources for the study of Greek history, both literary and non-literary.  Every effort will be made to consider important trends and key topics in the social, economic and intellectual history of the ancient Greeks, as well as political and military history, and to avoid an overwhelmingly Athenocentric perspective.

Texts:

The following four books are required for the course:

Osborne, R. 1996. Greece in the Making 1200-479 BC. Routledge.

Hornblower, S. 2002. The Greek World 479-323 B.C.3. Routledge.

Meiggs, R. and D. Lewis. 1990. A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions. Oxford UP.

Rhodes, P. and R. 2007. Osborne, Greek Historical Inscriptions 404-323 B.C. Oxford U.P.

 

Key passages of ancient authors will be treated in the original. Participants are urged to acquire their own copies of Herodotus, Thucydides and Xenophon, Hellenica in the original. The recommended editions of Herodotus and Thucydides are: 

Strassler, R. B. (ed.). 1998. The Landmark Thucydides. Simon & Schuster.

Strassler, R. B. (ed.). 2007. The Landmark Herodotus. Simon & Schuster. 

Strassler, R. B. (ed.). 2009. The Landmark Xenophon’s Hellenika. Simon & Schuster. 

 

English translations of the inscriptions in Meiggs/Lewis and Rhodes/Osborne are available in:

Fornara, C. 1983. Translated Documents of Greece and Rome I. Cambridge UP.

Harding, P. 1985. Translated Documents of Greece and Rome II. Cambridge UP.

C C 348 • Ancient Greek Religion

33660 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 1.204
(also listed as R S 365)

This course will investigate the practices, premises, and cultural contexts of ancient Greek religion using a variety of ancient sources and modern approaches. Among the topics we will consider are:

  • the nature of the evidence
  • the Mediterranean context
  • continuity and change
  • divine poiesis
  • sacred space
  • festivals
  • religion, philosophy, and science
  • personal piety
  • prophecy, divination, and dreams

The format will be a combination of lectures, discussion, and student presentations. Grading:

  • Daily questions: 10%
  • Quizzes: 20% (10% each)
  • Presentation: 10%
  • Midterm 25%
  • Final: 35%

Texts:

  • Kearns, Emily. Ancient Greek Religion. A Sourcebook. Wiley-Blackwell 2010.
  • Mikalson, Jon D. Ancient Greek Religion. Blackwell. 2005.
  • Price, Simon. Religions of the Ancient Greeks (Key Themes in Ancient History). Oxford. 1999.

 

GK 385 • Archaic Greek Poetry & Polits

33880 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as GK 365)

Solon the Athenian: Archaic Greek Poetry and Politics

The main goal of this course is to improve the students’ facility in reading and understanding Greek. We will achieve this goal by reading, translating, and analyzing a selection of archaic Greek verse and classical prose concerning the Athenian poet and statesman, Solon, as well as archaic verse attributed to other poets (including inscribed verse) that served a similarly public and political function. The functions of poetry in archaic political life (persuasive, apologetic, etc.) will be a central theme. Initial assignments will be limited to what we can translate in class; but the pace will pick up as we proceed. There will be written exercises and translation tests along the way, and a comprehensive ?nal exam; all tests will include unseen passages, aka sight translation.

Grading:

  • Students in GK 365 will have additional writing assignments.
  • Students in GK 385 will have additional reading assignments.
  • Grades for 365: class participation and exercises 20%, tests 30%, ?nal exam 25%,
  • term paper 25%.
  • Grades for 385: class participation and exercises 20%, tests 40%, ?nal exam 40%.

Texts:

M. L. West, Iambi et Elegi Graeci ante Alexandrum cantati vol. II, editio altera. OUP, 1992. ISBN 0-19-814096-7.

GK 390 • Polybius

33560 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

.

AHC 378 • Athenian Empire

33055 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.106
(also listed as HIS 350L)

During much of the 5th century BCE Athens was the cultural and intellectual center of the Greek world. The citizens of 5th-century Athens enjoyed an unprecedented level of power in governing a state whose wealth was derived largely from slave labor and imperial tribute. This course will explore Athenian society, democracy, and empire from the development of Athenian hegemony in the 470’s BCE through the break-up of the Athenian Empire in 404 BCE.

This upper division course carries a writing flag and will be conducted as a seminar with student participation central to its success. The structure of the class will be topics-oriented (a selection of key topics and problems rather than a historical survey). We will explore the full range of evidence availble to the ancient historian: literary, documentary (inscriptions and papyri), and the material record as documented through archaeological excavation (from temples to coins and everything in between). Our focus will be these ancient sources and the methods modern historians use in their interpretation.

FINAL GRADE is based 1/3 upon attendance and participation, 1/3 upon reports, and 1/3 upon the term paper (10-12 pages).

DISCUSSION.  Students are expected to attend and to PARTICIPATE in discussion.  Reporters have responsibility for opening and directing class discussion, because their reports offer positions and relevant facts that set the seminar's debate.   Reporters are urged to consult with me and to cooperate with each other. ? 

REPORTS.  Each student is required to write TWO reports from among those offered on the syllabus. The report is an essay (4-5 pages) based upon the relevant general readings and specific readings assigned for each topic.  Copies of each report must be made available (via Blackboard) for the entire class NO LATER THAN 9:00 A.M. on the MONDAY of the week the report is to be discussed so that all members of the seminar can read these reports as part of their assignment. 

TERM PAPER.   Each student will write a term paper (10-12 pages) based on primary and secondary sources on a topic of her/his choice in consultation with the professor.

BOOKS

Joint Association of Classical Teachers. The World of Athens: An Introduction to Classical Athenian Culture (Reading Greek). Cambridge UP, 2008. 

Strassler, Robert B. (ed.). The Landmark Thucydides. Simon and Schuster.

Fornara, Charles W. (ed.). Translated Documents of Greece & Rome. 1. Archaic times to the end of the Peloponnesian War. Cambridge UP.

Scott-Kilvert, Ian (ed.). Plutarch. The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Lives. Penguin.

Barrett, David and Alan H. Sommerstein (eds.). Aristophanes. The Knights, Peace, The Birds, The Assemblywomen, Wealth. Penguin

GK 324 • Life Of Themistocles

33395 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

This course provides an intermediate level Greek course for students who have taken the

sequence in Attic Greek through GK 322, or the equivalent. In this course, we shall

concentrate on close reading of major Greek prose authors. Attention will be paid both to

grammar and to building vocabulary and critical sensibilities within the genres of history

and biography.  We shall read most of Plutarch’s Life of Themistocles together with

passages from Thucydides, Herodotus and Aristotle (Constitution of the Athenians) and

inscriptions that concern this infamous Athenian statesman and general.

 

I. REQUIRED TEXTs: 

Marr, J. L. Plutarch, Life of Themistocles. Introduction, Text, Translation and

Commentary (Warminster, 1998).

There will be additional readings, both Greek texts and commentaries and modern

scholarship.

II. GRADES

 I do not grade on a curve. The following components will be considered in computing

your grade:

 25%      attendance & participation

10%      quizzes                                        

15%      Exam I

20%      Exam II

20%      Exam III

10%      paper (commentary)

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32890-32905 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.110
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

Textbook:

D. Brendan Nagle, The Ancient World: A Social and Cultural History (7th edition). Prentice Hall.

John Haywood. The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Civilizations (Penguin Books). 2005.

 

C C 383 • Greek History Survey

33140 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM WAG 10

This course has several objectives:

1. to prepare Ph.D. students for the Qualifying Exam in Greek History, which will form the Final Examination of the seminar itself;

2. to master a narrative of Greek history of the Archaic and Classical periods;

3. to explore the claims of competing narratives through a close study of key topics (sources, methods, approaches);

4. to identify key themes.

Attention will be paid to social, economic and intellectual history of the ancient Greeks, as well as political and military history. Class sessions will combine lectures, short student presentations, and discussion. Sealey (available on Blackboard), Osborne, and Hornblower will provide the basic narrative framework. Sealey covers the period 700-338, Osborne the period 1200-479, and Hornblower the period 479-338. It will be useful to compare Sealey and Osborne/Hornblower. We will pursue the third and fourth objectives through the examination of topics and problems including e.g.:

1.  polis and ethnos, origins

2.  the development of the Spartan taxis

3.  asty and chora, the unification of Attica

4.  Persian Wars and Greek nationalism: rhetoric and iconography

5.  Thucydides and the Athenian Empire

6.  the philosophers as historical sources: Aristotles' politeiai

7.  experiments in federalism: the Boiotian League

8.  utopianism in the late Classical period

9.  how the Greeks organized their past

Particular attention will be paid to the nature and evaluation of the sources for the study of Greek history, both literary and non-literary.  Every effort will be made to consider important trends and key topics in the social, economic and intellectual history of the ancient Greeks, as well as political and military history, and to avoid an overwhelmingly Athenocentric perspective.

Texts:

The following four books are required for the course:

Osborne, R. 1996. Greece in the Making 1200-479 BC. Routledge.

Hornblower, S. 2002. The Greek World 479-323 B.C.3. Routledge.

Meiggs, R. and D. Lewis. 1990. A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions. Oxford UP.

Rhodes, P. and R. 2007. Osborne, Greek Historical Inscriptions 404-323 B.C. Oxford U.P.

 

Key passages of ancient authors will be treated in the original. Participants are urged to acquire their own copies of Herodotus, Thucydides and Xenophon, Hellenica in the original. The recommended editions of Herodotus and Thucydides are: 

Strassler, R. B. (ed.). 1998. The Landmark Thucydides. Simon & Schuster.

Strassler, R. B. (ed.). 2007. The Landmark Herodotus. Simon & Schuster. 

Strassler, R. B. (ed.). 2009. The Landmark Xenophon’s Hellenika. Simon & Schuster. 

 

English translations of the inscriptions in Meiggs/Lewis and Rhodes/Osborne are available in:

Fornara, C. 1983. Translated Documents of Greece and Rome I. Cambridge UP.

Harding, P. 1985. Translated Documents of Greece and Rome II. Cambridge UP. 

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32890-32905 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)

The Ancient Mediterranean World is an introductory survey of the history, culture, and society of the peoples of the ancient Mediterranean (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Italy) from ca. 3000 B.C. to ca. A.D. 650 focusing on the active cultural exchange among the diverse civilizations of the broader region that shaped their history and cultural identity and the development of ideas and institutions in the Greek and Roman worlds. The ancient Mediterranean is an especially fascinating region to study because of the diversity of the civilizations that emerged and developed in a relatively small geographical area. Each had its distinctive character, but vigorous cultural exchange in the region and beyond led to the assimilation, adaptation, or rejection (or a combination) by one culture of the ideas and practices of others. Thus, as we study a particular civilization, a major theme will be cultural interaction, and its consequences and implications for understanding the historical development of the various cultures living in this broad region. Other broad themes include the origin and diffusion of civilizations, the rise and fall of empires, and urbanization. The tools (evidence) of the ancient historian are wide-ranging and include literary texts, documents, artifacts, coins, art and architecture, and more. The lectures, discussion sections, and written assignments will introduce you to the wide-ranging tools of the ancient historian and give you experience in interpreting these primary sources and constructing historical arguments based upon reason and evidence.

 

Required Texts

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: A Social and Cultural History (6th ed.).

John Haywood and Simon Hall, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Civilizations (Penguin Historical Atlas).

From time to time there will be additional readings on Blackboard.

AHC 325 • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

32795-32810 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 354C, CTI 375, HIS 354C)

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the Archaic and Early Classical Periods (ca. 800-400 B.C.). Emphasis will be divided between political/military history and ancient Greek society and culture (e.g. gender and class, religion, economy, performance). The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a mandatory one-hour discussion section. Particular attention will be paid to the interpretation of ancient sources, both written works and the archaeological remains.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

Grades will be based on:

 

25%    midterm examination

40%    final examination

35%    discussion section (short quizzes, 8 short writing assignments, active and informed participation in discussion)

 

There are no prerequisites.

 

Required Texts:

 

1. Ian Morris and Barry B. Powell, The Greeks. History, Culture, and Society. Prentice Hall

2. Robert B. Strassler (ed.), The Landmark Herodotus. Simon and Schuster

3. Robert B. Strassler (ed.), The Landmark Thucydides. Simon and Schuster

4. Charles W. Fornara (ed.), Translated Documents of Greece & Rome 1. Archaic Times to the End of the Peloponnesian War. Cambridge UP

GK 322 • Advanced Greek I

33120 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 112

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Greek 312K or 312L with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of A, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.In this course, we shall concentrate on close and continuous reading of major Greek authors. Attention will be paid both to grammar and to building vocabulary. 

 

In this semester, we shall focus on the Greek orators Lysias (Lysias 3) and Isaios (Isaios 2) and the tragic poet Euripides (choral odes from Medea). 

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

33170-33185 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as C C 354D, HIS 354D)

History of Greece from the end of the Peloponnesian War to  the defeat of Greece by Rome (404-146 B.C.)

 


33390

MW
F

1200 to   100p
1000 to  1100a

WAG  201
GAR  0.120

PERLMAN, P

 
  • Global cultures

33395

MW
F

1200 to   100p
1200 to   100p

WAG  201
GAR  1.134

PERLMAN, P

 

  • Global cultures

33400

MW
TH

1200 to   100p
200 to   300p

WAG  201
CBA  4.346

PERLMAN, P

 
  • Global cultures

33405

MW
TH

1200 to   100p
400 to   500p

WAG  201
CBA  4.342

PERLMAN, P

This course covers essential developments in Greek history during the 4th century and the Hellenistic period. Emphasis will be divided between political/military history (Alexander the Great is the pivotal figure of the course) and the changing social, cultural, and intellectual scene of the expanding Greek world. The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a mandatory one-hour discussion section.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag; it may also be counted as an elective.

Grades will be based on:

25%    midterm examination
45%    final examination
35%     discussion section (short quizzes, short writing assignments, participation in     discussion)

There are no prerequisites.

Texts:

Walbank, F. W., The Hellenistic World. Harvard, 1993.

Arrian, The Campaigns of Alexander, trans. A. de Sélincourt, Penguin 1971

Austin, M. M., The Hellenistic world from Alexander to the Roman conquest. Cambridge, 1981.

Plutarch, The Age of Alexander. Penguin, 1973.

GK 324 • Life Of Themistocles

33505 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CBA 4.336

In this course, we shall concentrate on close and continuous reading of major Greek prose authors. Attention will be paid both to grammar and to building vocabulary and critical sensibilities within the genres of history and biography.  We shall read most of Plutarch’s Life of Themistocles together with passages from Thucydides, Herodotus and Aristotle (Constitution of the Athenians) that concern this infamous Athenian statesman and general.

Prerequisite: Greek 322, or consent of the undergraduate adviser and the instructor.

Grades will be computed as follows:

Participation        35% (attendance, translation, quizzes)
Midterm I        15%
Midterm II        20%
Midterm III        20%
Paper            10%

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32060-32075 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 201
(also listed as C C 319D, EUS 306, HIS 319D)

AHC 319 1-ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

32060

MW
TH

1000 to  1100a
1000 to  1100a

WAG  201
UTC  1.136

PERLMAN, P

 

  • Global cultures

32065

MW
F

1000 to  1100a
1000 to  1100a

WAG  201
CAL  323

PERLMAN, P

 

  • Global cultures

32070

MW
TH

1000 to  1100a
1100 to  1200p

WAG  201
CAL  22

PERLMAN, P

 

  • Global cultures

32075

MW
F

1000 to  1100a
100 to   200p

WAG  201
CAL  200

PERLMAN, P

 

C C 319D ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD

32215

MW
TH

1000 to  1100a
1000 to  1100a

WAG  201
UTC  1.136

PERLMAN, P

 

  • Global cultures

32220

MW
F

1000 to  1100a
1000 to  1100a

WAG  201
CAL  323

PERLMAN, P

 

  • Global cultures

32225

MW
TH

1000 to  1100a
1100 to  1200p

WAG  201
CAL  22

PERLMAN, P

 

  • Global cultures

32230

MW
F

1000 to  1100a
100 to   200p

WAG  201
CAL  200

PERLMAN, P

 

AHC/CC 319D is a survey of the history, culture, and society of the peoples of the ancient Mediterranean (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Italy) from ca. 3000 B.C. to A.D. 476 focusing on the active cultural exchange among the diverse civilizations of the broader region that shaped their history and cultural identity and the development of ideas and institutions in the Greek and Roman worlds. It is intended to provide participants with a historical framework, to serve as a gateway to more advanced study of the ancient Mediterranean world, and to introduce students to the sources and methods used in its study. The course consists of two lectures and one mandatory discussion section per week.

Requirements/Grading Basis:
mid-term (30%)
final exam (40%)
papers (20%)
discussion section participation (10%)

Texts: D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: A Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 6th?). Prentice Hall
ISBN-13: 9780131930414

D. Brendan Nagle and S.M.Burstein, The Ancient World: Readings in Social and Cultural History (most recent edition, 3rd?) Prentice Hall
ISBN-13: 9780131930407

John Haywood and Simon Hall, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Civilizations (Penguin Historical Atlas)
ISBN 9780141014487

C C 383 • Greek History Survey

32300 • Fall 2010
Meets WF 1:00PM-2:30PM WAG 10

The object of this graduate seminar is to prepare Ph.D. students for the Qualifying Exam in Greek History, which will form the Final Examination of the seminar itself.  Within the framework of a general overview of Greek history during the Archaic and Classical periods we will examine in depth key topics including:

1.  polis  and ethnos, origins
2.  the development of the Spartan taxis
3.  asty  and chora, the unification of Attica
4.  the Persian wars and Greek Nationalism:  Rhetoric and iconography
5.  Thucydides and the Athenian Empire
6.  the philosophers as historical sources:  Aristotles' Politeiai
7.  experiments in federalism: the Boiotian League
8.  utopianism in the late Classical period
9.  how the Greeks organized their past

Particular attention will be paid to the nature and evaluation of the sources for the study of ancient history, both literary and non-literary, and to the field of historiagraphy (how history is written).  Every effort will be made to consider important trends and key topics in the social, economic and intellectual history of the ancient Greeks, as well as political and military history, and to avoid an overwhelmingly Athenocentric perspective.

Course grades will be based on the Final Examination, regular and active classroom participation, one oral presentation (length will depend upon enrollment) and two papers, one on an assigned topic and the other on a topic of your choice.  Class format will combine brief introductory or overview lectures and discussion.

Key passages of ancient authors and inscriptions will be treated in the original.  Participants should acquire their own (or library) copies of Herodotus, Thucydides and Xenophon (Hellenica).  Every attempt has been made to limit the reading list to the essentials; but it is, I regret, an expensive one. 

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

32355-32370 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 201

AHC 325 Topics in Ancient History:

Topics in the history of the Greek and Roman empires and the surrounding area.

C C 383 • Slavery

32635 • Spring 2010
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as GK 385)

See Attached

AHC 325 • Hist Grc To End Pelopon War

32530-32545 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 201
(also listed as C C 354C, HIS 354C)

AHC 325 Topics in Ancient History:

Topics in the history of the Greek and Roman empires and the surrounding area.

AHC 325 • History Of Greece To 146 Bc

31895-31910 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 201

AHC 325 Topics in Ancient History:

Topics in the history of the Greek and Roman empires and the surrounding area.

AHC 378 • Writing Ancient Hist Today-W

31913 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as HIS 350L)

AHC 378 Undergraduate Seminar in Ancient History:

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in Greek and Roman history.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags.

C C 383 • Greek History Survey

32905 • Fall 2008
Meets WF 1:00PM-2:30PM WAG 10

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

GK 324 • Attic Prose & Athenian Society

33010 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112

GK 324 Advanced Greek:

Reading and analysis of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, and Plato.

Prerequisites: Greek 312K or 312L (or 322) with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of at least A-, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32635 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GSB 2.124

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 312K • Sec-Yr Gk II: Selected Writers

32890 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 208

Continuation of Greek 311. Extensive selections of Greek prose and/or poetry. Class meetings will be devoted especially to translation, grammar and syntax, and secondarily to discussion of the texts in their cultural context.

Greek 312K and 312L may not both be counted.

Prerequisites Greek 311 with a grade of at least C.

AHC 319 • Ancient Mediterranean World

32940-32955 • Fall 2007
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 101
(also listed as C C 319D, HIS 319D)

"Ancient Mediterranean World" surveys the major civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Italy from the dawn of the city around 3000 BC through the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 400s AD. Beyond providing a basic historical framework, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various civilizations of the area influenced one another culturally. We will examine interactions between Egyptians, Sumerians, Hittites, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks and Romans, among others. Students will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week.

This course carries the Global Cultures and Writing flags.

This course fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 383 • Crete: Hist & Cul, 1190-67 Bce

33225 • Fall 2007
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

AHC 378 • Ancient Sparta-W

30920 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as HIS 350L)

AHC 378 Undergraduate Seminar in Ancient History:

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in Greek and Roman history.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags.

GK 324 • Attic Prose & Athenian Society

31263 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

GK 324 Advanced Greek:

Reading and analysis of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, and Plato.

Prerequisites: Greek 312K or 312L (or 322) with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of at least A-, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

30500 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 348 • Ancient Greek Religion

30570 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 101

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

GK 312K • Sec-Yr Gk II: Selected Writers

29870 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CBA 4.342

Continuation of Greek 311. Extensive selections of Greek prose and/or poetry. Class meetings will be devoted especially to translation, grammar and syntax, and secondarily to discussion of the texts in their cultural context.

Greek 312K and 312L may not both be counted.

Prerequisites Greek 311 with a grade of at least C.

C C 383 • Greek History Survey

30445 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

C C 383 Studies in Classical Civilization:

Studies in various aspects of Greek and Roman literature, history, and culture.

GK 324 • Greek Symposium

30535 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM RAS 211B

GK 324 Advanced Greek:

Reading and analysis of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, and Plato.

Prerequisites: Greek 312K or 312L (or 322) with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of at least A-, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

C C 303 • Intro To Classcl Mythol-Hon-W

28400 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

C C 348 • Greek Private Life

28490 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 201

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 348 • Sparta: Myth And Reality-W

28830 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as HIS 350L)

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

GK 383 • Epigraphy

29045 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

Topics given in recent years include Greek oratory, Aristophanes, and Homer.

C C 348 • Making Of Greece-W

28040 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as HIS 350L)

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

C C 303 • Intro To Classcl Mythol-Hon-W

28455 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 112

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 383 • Survey Of Greek History

28815 • Fall 2002
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

Topics given in recent years include Greek oratory, Aristophanes, and Homer.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

28390 • Spring 2002
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

GK 383 • Herodotus

28455 • Spring 2002
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM WAG 10

Topics given in recent years include Greek oratory, Aristophanes, and Homer.

C C 303 • Classical Mythology

27850 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM FAC 21

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 390 • Greek Constitution

28210 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 10

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

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