Center of Mexican American Studies
Center of Mexican American Studies

Rolando Hinojosa-Smith


ProfessorPh.D., University of Illinois

Ellen Clayton Garwood Professor
Rolando Hinojosa-Smith

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 471-8796
  • Office: PAR 324 and PAR 108
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Interests


American Literature and Creative Writing

Courses


MAS 314 • Mexican American Lit And Cul

35105 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 204
(also listed as E 314V)

E 314V  l  3-Mexican American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  Hinajosa-Smith, R

Unique #:  33900

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  MAS 314

Flags:  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.; Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: The course will cover a wide-spectrum of Mexican-Society: We will begin with Mexican-American urbanites living in one of this country’s largest cities. This text will be followed by a Mexican family who crosses illegally into the United States to work and to search for the so-called American Dream. The third text centers on Mexican American migrant workers who, in contrast to the characters in the preceding novel, are native born Americans. The next text is a book of poetry by a Mexican American writer who has also won high recognition as a writer of Children’s Literature. In contrast to the novels mentioned, the students will now read of middle class Mexican American citizens who have lived in the area since the middle of the eighteenth century. The final novel is the second part of the second text; the family, after naturalization, and are now American citizens. The different strata of this section of American society provide a wide scope of Mexican American life.

The class will not be a replica of many lecture classes: in this instance, the professor will read from prepared lectures and the students will be given copies of them and thus 1) read the material, and 2) hear it as the professor reads the lecture. This, along with the student’s reading assignments, is designed for the students to come prepared with written questions or statements, which will be turned in to the professor prior the beginning of the class. Questions written in class will not be accepted.

There will be no less than six essays; the student should read carefully; short quizzes will form part of the daily assignment. The book of poetry will entail oral readings and a declamation of a poem (from a list of ten) that the students will choose to recite during the semester.

Texts: The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros; The Circuit, Francisco Jimenez; And the Earth Did Not Devour Him, Tomas Rivera; Ask a Policeman, Rolando Hinojosa; Breaking Through, Francisco Jimenez.

Requirements & Grading: The Essays: 80%; short quizzes: 15%; and the poetry declamation: 5%.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Southwest-Mex Am

35205 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 204
(also listed as E 342)

E 342  l  1-Life and Literature of the Southwest--Mexican American

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R

Unique #:  34470

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  MAS 374

FLAGS:   CD

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This close-reading course focuses on works by men and women descendants of the original colonial settlers under the Spanish crown and some whose ancestors were Mexican-born. The course will cover two genres, the novel and a book of poetry, the latter by Pat Mora. This is a close-reading class.

During the course of the semester, the students will be reminded orally and by the written word that this is a course in an English Department and that punctuation, clarity, mechanics, diction, and grammar are not only important, they are also essential.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Tomás Rivera, . . . And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Pat Mora, Borders; Francisco Jiménez, The Circuit and Breaking Through; Rolando Hinojosa, Ask a Policeman.

Requirements & Grading: This course calls for six to seven essays to meet the writing requirements. The essays are worth 8% and the daily quizzes count for 15 points of the final grade.

This is an English course, and it calls for close reading. The following elements: punctuation, clarity, mechanics, usage, and grammar are the students’ responsibility. It is essential, then, that you know what they mean.

Class lectures will provide the cultural and linguistic backgrounds found in the texts. Student-led discussion either individually or by teams of twos will also form part of the class instruction.

In poetry, each student will memorize and recite a poem from Mora's text; to prevent embarrassment, the recitation will be held individually at the student's and the instructor's convenience in the instructor's office.

Class attendance is a student's responsibility; more than three absences will affect the students' grades; this does not affect death in the family or illness; the latter must be verified by a doctor's written statement.

CRW 325F • Fiction Writing

33890 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 308

CRW 325F  l  Fiction Writing

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R

Unique #:  33890

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: C L 315, E 603B, 316L (or 316K), 316M (or 316K), 316N (or 316K), 316P (or 316K), or T C 603B.

Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class.

This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind.

No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril.

Requirements & Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience.

In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade.

The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on.

For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

MAS 314 • Mexican American Lit And Cul

36380 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 1.134
(also listed as E 314V)

Instructor:  Hinajosa-Smith, R

Unique #:  35130

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  MAS 314

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: The course will cover a wide-spectrum of Mexican-Society: We will begin with Mexican-American urbanites living in one of this country’s largest cities.  This text will be followed by a Mexican family who crosses illegally into the United States to work and to search for the so-called American Dream.  The third text centers on Mexican American migrant workers who, in contrast to the characters in the preceding novel, are native born Americans.  The next text is a book of poetry by a Mexican American writer who has also won high recognition as a writer of Children’s Literature.  In contrast to the novels mentioned, the students will now read of middle class Mexican American citizens who have lived in the area since the middle of the eighteenth century.  The final novel is the second part of the second text; the family, after naturalization, and are now American citizens.  The different strata of this section of American society provide a wide scope of Mexican American life.

The class will not be a replica of many lecture classes: in this instance, the professor will read from prepared lectures and the students will be given copies of them and thus 1) read the material, and 2) hear it as the professor reads the lecture.  This, along with the student’s reading assignments, is designed for the students to come prepared with written questions or statements, which will be turned in to the professor prior the beginning of the class.  Questions written in class will not be accepted.

There will be no less than six essays; the student should read carefully; short quizzes will form part of the daily assignment.  The book of poetry will entail oral readings and a declamation of a poem (from a list of ten ) that the students will choose to recite during the semester.

Texts: The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros

The Circuit, Francisco Jimenez

And the Earth Did Not Devour Him, Tomas Rivera

Ask a Policeman, Rolando Hinojosa

Breaking Through, Francisco Jimenez

Grading: The Essays: 80%; short quizzes: 15%; and the poetry declamation: 5%

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Southwest-Mex Am

36455 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 2.112
(also listed as E 342)

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R

Unique #:  35750

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  MAS 374

Flags:  Cultural Diversity

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This close-reading course focuses on works by men and women descendants of the original colonial settlers under the Spanish crown and some whose ancestors were Mexican-born. The course will cover two genres, the novel and a book of poetry, the latter by Pat Mora. This is a close-reading class.

During the course of the semester, the students will be reminded orally and by the written word that this is a course in an English Department and that punctuation, clarity, mechanics, diction, and grammar are not only important, they are also essential.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Tomás Rivera, . . . And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Pat Mora, Borders; Francisco Jiménez, The Circuit and Breaking Through; Rolando Hinojosa, Ask a Policeman.

Requirements & Grading: This course calls for six to seven essays to meet the writing requirements. The essays are worth 8% and the daily quizzes count for 15 points of the final grade.

This is an English course, and it calls for close reading. The following elements: punctuation, clarity, mechanics, usage, and grammar are the students’ responsibility. It is essential, then, that you know what they mean.

Class lectures will provide the cultural and linguistic backgrounds found in the texts. Student-led discussion either individually or by teams of twos will also form part of the class instruction.

In poetry, each student will memorize and recite a poem from Mora's text; to prevent embarrassment, the recitation will be held individually at the student's and the instructor's convenience in the instructor's office.

Class attendance is a student's responsibility; more than three absences will affect the students' grades; this does not affect death in the family or illness; the latter must be verified by a doctor's written statement.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35890 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 310

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R

Unique #:  35890

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class.

This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind.

No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril.

Requirements & Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience.

In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade.

The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on.

For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Southwest-Mex Am

36697 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 306
(also listed as E 342)

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R

Unique #:  35985

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  MAS 374

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This close-reading course focuses on works by men and women descendants of the original colonial settlers under the Spanish crown and some whose ancestors were Mexican-born. The course will cover two genres, the novel and a book of poetry, the latter by Pat Mora. This is a close-reading class.

During the course of the semester, the students will be reminded orally and by the written word that this is a course in an English Department and that punctuation, clarity, mechanics, diction, and grammar are not only important, they are also essential.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Tomás Rivera, . . . And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Pat Mora, Borders; Francisco Jiménez, The Circuit and Breaking Through; Rolando Hinojosa, Ask a Policeman.

Requirements & Grading: This course calls for six to seven essays to meet the writing requirements. The essays are worth 8% and the daily quizzes count for 15 points of the final grade.

This is an English course, and it calls for close reading. The following elements: punctuation, clarity, mechanics, usage, and grammar are the students’ responsibility. It is essential, then, that you know what they mean.

Class lectures will provide the cultural and linguistic backgrounds found in the texts. Student-led discussion either individually or by teams of twos will also form part of the class instruction.

In poetry, each student will memorize and recite a poem from Mora's text; to prevent embarrassment, the recitation will be held individually at the student's and the instructor's convenience in the instructor's office.

Class attendance is a student's responsibility; more than three absences will affect the students' grades; this does not affect death in the family or illness; the latter must be verified by a doctor's written statement.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35715 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 112

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35715            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class.

This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind.

No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril.

Requirements & Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience.

In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade.

The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on.

For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Southwest-Mex Am

36545 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as E 342)

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35780            Flags:  Cultural Diversity

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  MAS 374            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This close-reading course focuses on works by men and women descendants of the original colonial settlers under the Spanish crown and some whose ancestors were Mexican-born. The course will cover two genres, the novel and a book of poetry, the latter by Pat Mora. This is a close-reading class.

During the course of the semester, the students will be reminded orally and by the written word that this is a course in an English Department and that punctuation, clarity, mechanics, diction, and grammar are not only important, they are also essential.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Tomás Rivera, . . . And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Pat Mora, Borders; Francisco Jiménez, The Circuit and Breaking Through; Rolando Hinojosa, Ask a Policeman.

Requirements & Grading: This course calls for six to seven essays to meet the writing requirements. The essays are worth 8% and the daily quizzes count for 15 points of the final grade.

This is an English course, and it calls for close reading. The following elements: punctuation, clarity, mechanics, usage, and grammar are the students’ responsibility. It is essential, then, that you know what they mean.

Class lectures will provide the cultural and linguistic backgrounds found in the texts. Student-led discussion either individually or by teams of twos will also form part of the class instruction.

In poetry, each student will memorize and recite a poem from Mora's text; to prevent embarrassment, the recitation will be held individually at the student's and the instructor's convenience in the instructor's office.

Class attendance is a student's responsibility; more than three absences will affect the students' grades; this does not affect death in the family or illness; the latter must be verified by a doctor's written statement.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35350 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 310

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35350            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class.

This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind.

No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril.

Requirements & Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience.

In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade.

The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on.

For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35325 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35325            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class.

This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind.

No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril.

Requirements & Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience.

In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade.

The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on.

For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Southwest-Mex Am

36250 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as E 342)

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35420            Flags:  Cultural Diversity

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  MAS 374            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This close-reading course focuses on works by men and women descendants of the original colonial settlers under the Spanish crown and some whose ancestors were Mexican-born. The course will cover two genres, the novel and a book of poetry, the latter by Pat Mora. This is a close-reading class.

During the course of the semester, the students will be reminded orally and by the written word that this is a course in an English Department and that punctuation, clarity, mechanics, diction, and grammar are not only important, they are also essential.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Tomás Rivera, . . . And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Pat Mora, Borders; Francisco Jiménez, The Circuit and Breaking Through; Rolando Hinojosa, Ask a Policeman.

Requirements & Grading: This course calls for six to seven essays to meet the writing requirements. The essays are worth 8% and the daily quizzes count for 15 points of the final grade.

This is an English course, and it calls for close reading. The following elements: punctuation, clarity, mechanics, usage, and grammar are the students’ responsibility. It is essential, then, that you know what they mean.

Class lectures will provide the cultural and linguistic backgrounds found in the texts. Student-led discussion either individually or by teams of twos will also form part of the class instruction.

In poetry, each student will memorize and recite a poem from Mora's text; to prevent embarrassment, the recitation will be held individually at the student's and the instructor's convenience in the instructor's office.

Class attendance is a student's responsibility; more than three absences will affect the students' grades; this does not affect death in the family or illness; the latter must be verified by a doctor's written statement.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35215 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 304

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35215            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class.

This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind.

No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril.

Texts: The text has been ordered, and the student should find it listed under my section of E 325F.

Requirements & Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience.

In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade.

The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on.

For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Southwest-Mex Am

36065 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.128
(also listed as E 342)

Instructor:  Hinojosa-Smith, R            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35295            Flags:  Cultural Diversity

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  MAS 374            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This close-reading course focuses on works by men and women descendants of the original colonial settlers under the Spanish crown and some whose ancestors were Mexican-born. The course will cover two genres, the novel and a book of poetry, the latter by Pat Mora. This is a close-reading class.

During the course of the semester, the students will be reminded orally and by the written word that this is a course in an English Department and that punctuation, clarity, mechanics, diction, and grammar are not only important, they are also essential.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Tomás Rivera, . . . And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Pat Mora, Borders; Francisco Jiménez, The Circuit and Breaking Through; Rolando Hinojosa, Ask a Policeman.

Requirements & Grading: This course calls for six to seven essays to meet the writing requirements. The essays are worth 8% and the daily quizzes count for 15 points of the final grade.

This is an English course, and it calls for close reading. The following elements: punctuation, clarity, mechanics, usage, and grammar are the students’ responsibility. It is essential, then, that you know what they mean.

Class lectures will provide the cultural and linguistic backgrounds found in the texts. Student-led discussion either individually or by teams of twos will also form part of the class instruction.

In poetry, each student will memorize and recite a poem from Mora's text; to prevent embarrassment, the recitation will be held individually at the student's and the instructor's convenience in the instructor's office.

Class attendance is a student's responsibility; more than three absences will affect the students' grades; this does not affect death in the family or illness; the latter must be verified by a doctor's written statement.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35185 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class.

This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind.

No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril. 

Texts: The text has been ordered, and the student should find it listed under my section of E 325.

Requirements & Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience.

In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade.

The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on.

For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Southwest-Mex Am

36065 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 206
(also listed as E 342)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This close-reading course focuses on works by men and women descendants of the original colonial settlers under the Spanish crown and some whose ancestors were Mexican-born. The course will cover two genres, the novel and a book of poetry, the latter by Pat Mora. This is a close-reading class.

During the course of the semester, the students will be reminded orally and by the written word that this is a course in an English Department and that punctuation, clarity, mechanics, diction, and grammar are not only important, they are also essential. 

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Tomás Rivera, . . . And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Pat Mora, Borders; Francisco Jiménez, The Circuit and Breaking Through; Rolando Hinojosa, Ask a Policeman.

Requirements & Grading: The course calls for six to seven essays to meet the writing requirements. The essays are worth 85% and the daily quizzes count for 15 points of the final grade.

This is an English course, and it calls for close reading. The following elements: punctuation, clarity, mechanics, usage, and grammar are the students’ responsibility. It is essential, then, that you know what they mean.

Class lectures will provide the cultural and linguistic backgrounds found in the texts. Student-led discussion either individually or by teams of twos will also form part of the class instruction.

In poetry, each student will memorize and recite a poem from Mora's text; to prevent embarrassment, the recitation will be held individually at the student's and the instructor's convenience in the instructor's office.

Class attendance is a student's responsibility; more than three absences will affect the students' grades; this does not affect death in the family or illness; the latter must be verified by a doctor's written statement.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

35431 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 105

E 325 (Topic 1: Creative Writing: Fiction) and 325F may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Course Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class.

This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind.

No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril.

Texts: The text has been ordered, and the student should find it listed under my section of E 325.

Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience.

In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade.

The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on.

For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Southwest-Mex Am

36325 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 206
(also listed as E 342)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: This close-reading course focuses on works by men and women descendants of the original colonial settlers under the Spanish crown and some whose ancestors were Mexican-born. The course will cover two genres, the novel and a book of poetry, the latter by Pat Mora. This is a close-reading class.

During the course of the semester, the students will be reminded orally and by the written word that this is a course in an English Department and that punctuation, clarity, mechanics, diction, and grammar are not only important, they are also essential.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Tomás Rivera, . . . And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Pat Mora, Borders; Francisco Jiménez, The Circuit and Breaking Through; Rolando Hinojosa, Ask a Policeman.

Grading: Each student is assigned two grades of 100; the first is inviolate, the second will record lapses; each lapse counts 1.5 points. The lapses will be deducted from the first grade of 100 and what remains will be added to the inviolate and divided by two. Plusses and minuses will also be assigned. Essays due on Fridays will be returned on the next class day. Time will be taken to point out lapses and strong points of the students' s work.

Class lectures will provide the cultural and linguistic backgrounds found in the texts. Student-led discussion either individually or by teams of twos will also form part of the class instruction.

In poetry, each student will memorize and recite a poem from Mora's text; to prevent embarrassment, the recitation will be held individually at the student's and the instructor's convenience in the instructor's office.

Class attendance is a student's responsibility; more than three absences will affect the students' grades; this does not affect death in the family or illness; the latter must be verified by a doctor's written statement.

E 325F • Fiction Writing

34525 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 210

Course Description: The quality of the student's writing is an important factor toward the course grade. The course is, above all, an English course. The insistence on English usage should not come as a surprise; you are enrolled in an English class in a university of the first class. This is an upper division course for writers, and the instructor expects well-written papers. This includes 1) clarity, 2) grammar, 3) punctuation, 4) mechanics, and 5) usage. Students who are not up to the mark are advised to consider this most seriously before enrolling because the instructor insists on those basic requirements. They are basic since words are what writers work with; you are advised to keep this in mind. No old creative writing material will be considered; hence, the student is to hand in a detailed outline of the first proposed story by the third class meeting. No late papers, no excuses. Late registrants enter this class at their peril.

 Texts: The text has been ordered, and the student should find it listed under my section of E 325.

 Grading: Four thousand words is the required minimum in Writing Flag courses. Toward this, three stories of 1500 words minimum are required for the course. These will be rewritten until all lapses are corrected; do not expect an increase in your grade because you corrected the material; consider this part of your learning experience. In-class assignments will also be included as part of the grade. The papers will be critiqued, e.g., misspellings will be labeled SP, lapses in tenses will be marked T, lack of agreement (pronoun and antecedent; subject with verb) will be marked LA. Other lapses will be marked accordingly. If you have more than three misspelled words, the highest grade to expect is a C, provided there are no other errors. The same applies with errors in tenses, and so on. For your information: towards, backwards, amongst, and similar terms (which the instructor will point out) are examples of British-English usage; use American English.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

35950 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 206
(also listed as E 342)

E342: Life and Literature of the Southwest (34825)

Professor Hinojosa-Smith
Spring 2010, TuTh 9:30 - 11:00 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 379S • Senior Seminar-W

35360 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304

TBD

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

36230 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 204

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

35430 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 206

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

36425 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 204

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

36915 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 301

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

35690 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 310

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

34680 • Spring 2006
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM GAR 200

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

34425 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 101

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

33285 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 206

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

34055 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 105

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

32030 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 105

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

32630 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 304

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

31730 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 105

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

31735 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 105

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

32120 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 105

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

31680 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 303

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

32535 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 3

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

32170 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 3

Please check back for updates.

MAS 374 • Life/Lit Of Sthwest-Mex Am-W

31500 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 303

Please check back for updates.

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