Program in Comparative Literature

Dustin Hixenbaugh


Contact

  • Office: FAC 16
  • Office Hours: Tuesday 2-3pm; Thursday 10am-12pm

Interests


19th & 20th century; literature and culture of the United States, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Brazil; theories of gender, the archive, and transamerican cultural relations; romanticism; realism; country music; education

Biography


Dusty received BAs in English and Spanish at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, in 2006, and an MA in Comparative Literature from the University of Texas at Austin in 2011. As a Teach For America corps member, he taught high school English and coached a speech and debate team in La Joya, Texas, from 2006-2009. He is currently teaching classes in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing, and researching a dissertation on the nineteenth-century historical romance. In 2014, he co-founded the podcast LitWit, which discusses literature for a primarily non-academic audience.

His PhD work is supervised by Profs. César Salgado and John González.

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Country Music

43210 • Spring 2016
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 9

Since its emergence in the early twentieth century, “hillbilly music,” as it was then called, has been the subject of debate, ridicule, and occasional disapproval. It has also proven extremely popular with audiences both domestic and international, and given rise to some of the US’s best-known celebrities—Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, and Dolly Parton to name just a few. But what is country music, and how has it changed in the past hundred years? How does it speak to, and for, the “country” for which it is named? What does it mean to be “country”? 

This class respects country music as a serious form of cultural expression. Through research and extensive listening, we will situate particular artists and albums within their historical and cultural contexts. Specifically, we will explore how country music has responded to events like the Great Depression, the Civil Rights Movement, the feminist movement, the Vietnam War, and 9/11, and how its artists have contested the meaning of “country” by pursuing alternative sub-genres like honky tonk, the Nashville and Bakersfield “sounds,” and “outlaw” country. Though students are encouraged to research and write about artists they are interested in, the course will keep a tight focus on argument analysis—that is, how artists and audiences have argued through and about country music—and the development of students’ own research and writing skills.

Please note the course carries a writing flag and requires daily listening and reading assignments.

 

Assignments and Grading

In Unit 1, students will collaboratively research different country music movements before placing one song or album of their choice in its rhetorical context. Assignments include one 15-20 minute group presentation (5% of the final course grade), and one 4-6 page Context Analysis Essay (5% for the first draft, and 10% for the final). In Unit 2, students will conduct an extended rhetorical analysis of one album or song of their choice. Assignments include three Short Analysis Essays of 1-2 pages in length (15%), which they will then revise and combine into one 4-6 page Long Analysis Essay (15%). Lastly, in Unit 3, students will write one 4-6 page Final Argument Essay (10% for the first draft, and 15% for the final) in which they will explain how they see country music, as a genre, responding to a specific historical event or cultural trend.

Over the course of the semester, students will also write four 1-2 page Research Summaries (15%) and post weekly to the class’s Discussion Board (10%).

 

Required Texts and Course Readings

This course requires two textbooks:

Rhetorical Analysis by Mark G. Longaker and Jeffrey Walker (Longman, 2010); and

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference (4th ed.), by Andrea Lunsford (Bedford, 2009).

Students will also read excerpts from a number of other texts about rhetoric or country music. These will be made available on the online Canvas system and may include: They Say/I Say (2014), Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein; All That Glitters (1993), John Buckley; In the Country of Country (1997), Nicholas Dawidoff; Behind Closed Doors (2002), Alanna Nash; Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music (2012), Diane Pecknold; Rednecks and Bluenecks (2007), Chris Willman; and others.

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

86305 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM MEZ 2.118

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Country Music

43690 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 10

Since its emergence in the early twentieth century, “hillbilly music,” as it was then called, has been the subject of debate, ridicule, and occasional disapproval. It has also proven extremely popular with audiences both domestic and international, and given rise to some of the US’s best-known celebrities—Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, and Dolly Parton to name just a few. But what is country music, and how has it changed in the past hundred years? How does it speak to, and for, the “country” for which it is named? What does it mean to be “country”?

 This class respects country music as a serious form of cultural expression. Through research  and extensive listening, we will situate particular artists and albums within their historical and cultural contexts. Specifically, we will explore how country music has responded to events like the Great Depression, the Civil Rights Movement, the feminist movement, the Vietnam War, and 9/11, and how its artists have contested the meaning of “country” by pursuing alternative sub-genres like honky tonk, the Nashville and Bakersfield “sounds,” and “outlaw” country. Though students are encouraged to research and write about artists they are interested in, the course will keep a tight focus on argument analysis—that is, how artists and audiences have argued through and about country music—and the development of students’ own research and writing skills.

Please note the course carries a writing flag and requires daily listening and reading assignments.

Assignments and Grading

In Unit 1, students will collaboratively research different country music movements before placing one song or album of their choice in its rhetorical context. Assignments include one 15-20 minute group presentation (5% of the final course grade), and one 4-6 page Context Analysis Essay (5% for the first draft, and 10% for the final). In Unit 2, students will conduct an extended rhetorical analysis of one album or song of their choice. Assignments include three Short Analysis Essays of 1-2 pages in length (15%), which they will then revise and combine into one 4-6 page Long Analysis Essay (15%). Lastly, in Unit 3, students will write one 4-6 page Final Argument Essay (10% for the first draft, and 15% for the final) in which they will explain how they see country music, as a genre, responding to a specific historical event or cultural trend.

Over the course of the semester, students will also write four 1-2 page Research Summaries (15%) and post weekly to the class’s Discussion Board (10%).

Required Texts and Course Readings

This course requires two textbooks:

Rhetorical Analysis by Mark G. Longaker and Jeffrey Walker (Longman, 2010); and

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference (4th ed.), by Andrea Lunsford (Bedford, 2009).

Students will also read excerpts from a number of other texts about rhetoric or country music. These will be made available on the online Canvas system and may include: They Say/I Say (2014), Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein; All That Glitters (1993), John Buckley; In the Country of Country (1997), Nicholas Dawidoff; Behind Closed Doors (2002), Alanna Nash; Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music (2012), Diane Pecknold; Rednecks and Bluenecks (2007), Chris Willman; and others.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Country Music

44595 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM FAC 10

Since its emergence in the early twentieth century, “hillbilly music,” as it was then called, has been the subject of debate, ridicule, and occasional disapproval. It has also proven extremely popular with audiences both domestic and international, and given rise to some of the US’s best-known celebrities—Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, and Dolly Parton to name just a few. But what is country music, and how has it changed in the past hundred years? How does it speak to, and for, the “country” for which it is named? What does it mean to be “country”?

 This class respects country music as a serious form of cultural expression. Through research  and extensive listening, we will situate particular artists and albums within their historical and cultural contexts. Specifically, we will explore how country music has responded to events like the Great Depression, the Civil Rights Movement, the feminist movement, the Vietnam War, and 9/11, and how its artists have contested the meaning of “country” by pursuing alternative sub-genres like honky tonk, the Nashville and Bakersfield “sounds,” and “outlaw” country. Though students are encouraged to research and write about artists they are interested in, the course will keep a tight focus on argument analysis—that is, how artists and audiences have argued through and about country music—and the development of students’ own research and writing skills.

Please note the course carries a writing flag and requires daily listening and reading assignments.

Assignments and Grading

In Unit 1, students will collaboratively research different country music movements before placing one song or album of their choice in its rhetorical context. Assignments include one 15-20 minute group presentation (5% of the final course grade), and one 4-6 page Context Analysis Essay (5% for the first draft, and 10% for the final). In Unit 2, students will conduct an extended rhetorical analysis of one album or song of their choice. Assignments include three Short Analysis Essays of 1-2 pages in length (15%), which they will then revise and combine into one 4-6 page Long Analysis Essay (15%). Lastly, in Unit 3, students will write one 4-6 page Final Argument Essay (10% for the first draft, and 15% for the final) in which they will explain how they see country music, as a genre, responding to a specific historical event or cultural trend.

Over the course of the semester, students will also write four 1-2 page Research Summaries (15%) and post weekly to the class’s Discussion Board (10%).

Required Texts and Course Readings

This course requires two textbooks:

Rhetorical Analysis by Mark G. Longaker and Jeffrey Walker (Longman, 2010); and

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference (4th ed.), by Andrea Lunsford (Bedford, 2009).

Students will also read excerpts from a number of other texts about rhetoric or country music. These will be made available on the online Canvas system and may include: They Say/I Say (2014), Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein; All That Glitters (1993), John Buckley; In the Country of Country (1997), Nicholas Dawidoff; Behind Closed Doors (2002), Alanna Nash; Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music (2012), Diane Pecknold; Rednecks and Bluenecks (2007), Chris Willman; and others.

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