Program in Comparative Literature

Miguel Santos-Neves


Interests


I am interested in representations of the plantation home in the Americas during the modernist period and in representations of miscegenation in American and Brazilian literature during the 19th and 20th century.

Biography


Language Background: English/Portuguese, French, Spanish
Supervising Faculty: Katie Arens, Cesar Salgado, Wayne Lesser, Ivan Teixeira from the University of São Paulo, Alexandra Wettlaufer.

Courses


RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of New York

44685 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 6

"The Big Apple", "The City That Never Sleeps", and "The City Everyone Loves to Hate" are just a few of the names given to New York City. Each reinforces the idea that New York and its residents occupy an unique place in the American cultural, political, and economic imaginary. As rhetoric students more than one thousand miles away from New York, we will use our physical distance to study how the residents construct and shape their own identities through the city, how they come to depict the city, and how this depiction in turn defines them.

To carry out our analysis we will work from the assumption that the identity of self and the identity of place function and are constructed like arguments, availing themselves of rhetorical appeals and techniques. As we proceed, we will ask a series of questions to orient ourselves through the landscape of the city.  What kind of rhetorical techniques are at work in the depiction of the city and how do they affect and shape New Yorkers? How have these portrayals and identities changed over time? How do they conceive of themselves? How are the residents of the city portrayed to those who live outside of it? How have other regions of the country perceived New York over the years? Does the city deserve its reputation?

We will focus our attention on two particular eras that shaped the development of the city: 1) The Gilded Age and The Early Wave of Immigration 2) The Beat Generation, Corporate Culture, and September 11th. To understand these eras, we will read short stories, poems, news paper and magazine articles, and we will view films and photographs. With each encountered artifact, we will examine how it reflects its time, and we will ask ourselves how it and its time are echoed today.

Course Requirements

Enthusiasm and Imagination. Attendance is required. Since this course has a substantial writing component, students will write three papers, 5-7 pages in length, each of which will be rewritten once. There will also be five one-page rhetorical analysis assignments of cultural artifacts.

Grading Criteria

Paper 1.1 (5-7 pages) 10%  /  Paper 1.2 (5-7 pages) 15%      
Paper 2.1 (5-7 pages) 10%  /  Paper 2.2 (5-7 pages) 15%
Paper 3.1 (5-7 pages) 10%  /  Paper 3.2 (5-7 pages) 15%
Rhetorical Analyses (5; one page) 25%

Required Texts

Writing New York: A Literary Anthology
Writing Arguments, Concise Edition: A Rhetoric with Readings

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of New York

44007 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM FAC 7

"The Big Apple", "The City That Never Sleeps", and "The City Everyone Loves to Hate" are just a few of the names given to New York City. Each reinforces the idea that New York and its residents occupy an unique place in the American cultural, political, and economic imaginary. As rhetoric students more than one thousand miles away from New York, we will use our physical distance to study how the residents construct and shape their own identities through the city, how they come to depict the city, and how this depiction in turn defines them.

To carry out our analysis we will work from the assumption that the identity of self and the identity of place function and are constructed like arguments, availing themselves of rhetorical appeals and techniques. As we proceed, we will ask a series of questions to orient ourselves through the landscape of the city.  What kind of rhetorical techniques are at work in the depiction of the city and how do they affect and shape New Yorkers? How have these portrayals and identities changed over time? How do they conceive of themselves? How are the residents of the city portrayed to those who live outside of it? How have other regions of the country perceived New York over the years? Does the city deserve its reputation?

We will focus our attention on two particular eras that shaped the development of the city: 1) The Gilded Age and The Early Wave of Immigration 2) The Beat Generation, Corporate Culture, and September 11th. To understand these eras, we will read short stories, poems, news paper and magazine articles, and we will view films and photographs. With each encountered artifact, we will examine how it reflects its time, and we will ask ourselves how it and its time are echoed today.

Course Requirements

Enthusiasm and Imagination. Attendance is required. Since this course has a substantial writing component, students will write three papers, 5-7 pages in length, each of which will be rewritten once. There will also be five one-page rhetorical analysis assignments of cultural artifacts.

Grading Criteria

Paper 1.1 (5-7 pages) 10%  /  Paper 1.2 (5-7 pages) 15%      
Paper 2.1 (5-7 pages) 10%  /  Paper 2.2 (5-7 pages) 15%
Paper 3.1 (5-7 pages) 10%  /  Paper 3.2 (5-7 pages) 15%
Rhetorical Analyses (5; one page) 25%

Required Texts

Writing New York: A Literary Anthology
Writing Arguments, Concise Edition: A Rhetoric with Readings

E 314L • Banned Books & Novel Ideas-W

34045 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A217A

 

E 314L: Banned Books and Novel Ideas

Instructor: Miguel Santos-Neves    miguelsantosneves@mail.utexas.edu                      E 314L; Unique # 34045                                    TTH 3:30-5:00PM ; JES A217A                      Office: 5th Floor of PCL; Office hours: TBD  
Required Texts: Ovid, The Art of Love; Niccolò  Machiavelli, The Prince; Molière, Tartuffe; Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels; Johan Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther; Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita; Allen Ginsberg, Howl.

Course Description

What leads to the banning of a book? Is it the content? The ideas contained in it? Or did the censors, perhaps, misread the book? A combination of these factors have led governments and religious institutions to ban books over the course of history. Often, they have found these books morally objectionable; in other instances, issues of pure expediency have led to censorship.

In this course, we will read a selection of censored books to gain insight into the controversies they started and into the political, social, and cultural climate that found them offensive. We will read each text while also trying to understand the justification offered by the censoring institution for banning a book. "Banned Books and Novel Ideas" helps to prepare students to be English majors. The course teaches students how to engage deeply and critically with the texts they encounter. Students will further perfect their close reading skills while also learning how to consider issues involving literary form as well as historical and cultural contexts. The course also helps student continue to developw their proficiency in writing and speaking.

Grading Policy

6 literary analysis and reaction papers, one page single-spaced, all together worth 50%
2 research papers, 5-7 pages, first one worth 20%, second one worth 30%

The instructor reserves the right to make changes to the syllabus during the semester.

"The University of Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-6441 TTY."

 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

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