The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas

CTI 302 • Classics Of Socl/Polit Thou

33715 • Siddiqi, Ahmed
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 1.134
(also listed as GOV 314)
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This course explores the changing role of human psychology in the history of political thought through the study of classic texts in philosophy and psychology. In roughly chronological order, we will examine several key philosophers’ accounts of the deepest human concerns—justice, happiness, and love—and the potential political life has to fulfill those yearnings. In the final part of the course, we will study Darwin’s evolutionary theory of human mental faculties in The Descent of Man, Freud’s theory of unconscious psychological drives, and current theories of evolutionary psychology. We will discuss how these different views of human nature suggest different approaches to politics and ethics.

We will read selections from the following works:

  • Plato The Republic, The Symposium 
  • St. Augustine: The Confessions, City of God 
  • Hobbes The Leviathan 
  • Rousseau Discourse on the Origin of Inequality
  • Nietzsche Beyond Good and Evil
  • Darwin The Descent of Man 
  • Freud Civilization and its Discontents

And selected articles on evolutionary psychology

Grading: Your grade will consist of two medium lengths papers (25% each), a final exam (30%), and class participation and reading quizzes (20%). Attendance is mandatory.


CTI 304 • Judaism, Christianity, & Islam

33719 • Moin, A
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GEA 114
(also listed as HIS 304R, ISL 311, J S 311, R S 304)
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This course asks students to recognize the ethical implications of the ways we talk about religion – both our own religion (if any) and those of others. Choosing definitions for religion is an ethical choice with social, political, and civic implications; the goal of this course is to assist students in becoming self-conscious about that choice. In so doing, students will improve their ability to tolerate and reduce moral disagreements about religious beliefs and practices, something that is at the heart of practical ethics education. Specifically, the ethical issues in this course encourage students to:

• reflect on different definitions of religion, to choose which ones appeal to them, and to explore their implications

• analyze the ways in which religions form “communities of memory,” to consider in what ways these communities create boundaries that both enclose and exclude

• understand the different ways that religions have historically intersected with with politics, with science, and with culture

•consider how these intersections might influence the students’ perceptions of religion and the ways in which religion is presented in contemporary media and popular culture.

 


CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33735 • Kaplan, Jonathan
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as MES 310, R S 315)
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Description

The figure of Moses looms large in biblical tradition, in the religions that revere him (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), and in Western thought. In this course, we will begin by examining the figure of Moses in the Bible (with a focus on Exodus and Deuteronomy) and the various roles he plays in the biblical tradition including prophet, priest, king, and legislator. We will then turn to examine the reception of Moses in Second Temple Judaism (Philo, Dead Sea Scrolls), Christianity, Rabbinic Judaism, and Islam. The later part of the course will explore the way this variegated tradition has been used to inform Western thought through reading selections from representative works such as Baruch Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise and Sigmund Freud’s Moses and Monotheism. We will conclude our study of Moses by examining how Moses has been portrayed in American history and by evaluating the descriptions of Moses in High School Social Studies textbooks.

Texts

• The New Oxford Annotated Bible: New Revised Standard Version with the Apocrypha (Augmented Fourth Edition, 2010). • Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, “They Say / I Say”: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. • Lynne Truss, Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation.• Roy Peter Clarke, Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer.• Readings from Philo, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Rabbinic Literature, Qur’anic Literature, Baruch Spinoza, and others will be posted on Canvas.

Grading

Attendance (10%)Participation (20%)Five Reading Response Papers (15%)Class Presentation (15%)Rough Draft of Final Term Paper (20%)Revised Final Draft of Final Term Paper (20%)

 


CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33737 • Yoo, Philip
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM JES A216A
(also listed as R S 315)
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Description

What, according to the Bible, is required of us? What is our response to the deity? What is our place in the cosmos? With these questions in mind, this course seeks to cultivate both an understanding of the Hebrew Bible (the Christian Old Testament) and the New Testament and how biblical writers and subsequent interpreters grappled with notions of divine command and human obligation. We pursue this aim through close readings of the biblical texts themselves and the reception of biblical figures, themes, and ideas among its many interpreters. We begin by examining the historical sense of the Hebrew Bible as a product of the ancient Near East. We will then examine the practice of biblical interpretation among the competing Jewish ideologies at the turn of the Common Era, out of which emerged the early Christians and the New Testament. The later part of the course will highlight some of the major Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible in the pre-modern and modern periods and how, through their own view of “scripturalism”, these interpreters understood and formulated responses to questions of human nature, humanity’s relationship to the supernatural, and the meaning of life.

Texts

  • The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. Edited by Michael D. Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, and Carol Newsom. 4th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. (indicated by NOAB in the Plan of Study, below)
  • Course Pack with selections from Readings from Philo, Rabbinic Literature, Qur’anic Literature, Maimonides, Augustine, Luther, Spinoza, Mendelsohn, Kierkegaard, and others.

 

Grading

  • Attendance (10%)
  • 5 short reading reports (2% each or 10%)
  • 2 short papers (15% each or 30%)
  • rewrite of one paper (25%)
  • final exam (25%). 

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33739 • Case, Megan
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 554
(also listed as R S 315)
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Before there was God, there was Enki; before God tamed the sea, Marduk defeated Tiamat. While much of the Western world has been shaped by the story of creation found in Genesis, what shaped those biblical accounts? The first half of this course focuses on this question, examining other creation accounts found in the ancient Near East, such as Atra?as?s and the En?ma Eliš, in order to place the biblical stories in their wider cultural setting. In the second half of the course, we analyze various interpretations of creation found in the traditions of the Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Throughout the entire course, “myth” serves as our guiding concept, as we consider whether the various creation accounts in the ancient Near East properly fit in that category.

 

Texts

  • Stephanie Dalley, Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989).
  • Malise Ruthven, Islam: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).
  • Robert A. Segal, Myth: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).
  • Normon Solomon, Judaism: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014).
  • Linda Woodhead, Christianity: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014).
  • The Harper Collins Study Bible
  • The Study Quran, Harper Collins
  • Other readings will be posted on Canvas

 

Grading

Class Participation: 15% 

Canvas Questions: 20%

Creation Story Small Comparisons: 15% (5% each)

Creation Story Large Comparison: 20% (10% comparison; 10% analysis)

Final Paper: 30% (5% 1st Draft; 5% Peer Review; 20% Final Draft)

 


CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33730 • Case, Megan
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A203A
(also listed as R S 315)
show description

Before there was God, there was Enki; before God tamed the sea, Marduk defeated Tiamat. While much of the Western world has been shaped by the story of creation found in Genesis, what shaped those biblical accounts? The first half of this course focuses on this question, examining other creation accounts found in the ancient Near East, such as Atra?as?s and the En?ma Eliš, in order to place the biblical stories in their wider cultural setting. In the second half of the course, we analyze various interpretations of creation found in the traditions of the Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Throughout the entire course, “myth” serves as our guiding concept, as we consider whether the various creation accounts in the ancient Near East properly fit in that category.

 

Texts:

  • Stephanie Dalley, Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989).
  • Malise Ruthven, Islam: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).
  • Robert A. Segal, Myth: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004).
  • Normon Solomon, Judaism: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014).
  • Linda Woodhead, Christianity: A Very Short Introduction, 2nd edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014).
  • The Harper Collins Study Bible
  • The Study Quran, Harper Collins
  • Other readings will be posted on Canvas

 

Grading:

  • Class Participation: 15% 
  • Canvas Questions: 20%
  • Creation Story Small Comparisons: 15% (5% each)
  • Creation Story Large Comparison: 20% (10% comparison; 10% analysis)
  • Final Paper: 30% (5% 1st Draft; 5% Peer Review; 20% Final Draft)

CTI 304 • The Bible & Its Interpreters

33720 • Landau, Brent
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 105
(also listed as R S 315)
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Among all the influential texts found in the Bible, none has had such an enormous impact on world history and culture as the Book of Genesis has. This may be somewhat surprising: given the fact that Christianity is the world’s largest religion, one might expect that one of the Gospels of the New Testament would be the most influential. Yet Genesis, with its tales of the strange world that existed before the Flood and its recounting of the exploits— sometimes morally questionable—of Israel’s patriarchs, exercised such a hold on the imagination of the earliest Christians that many New Testament writings can actually be seen as extended ruminations on the implications of the Genesis narrative…as can many other great works of literature and art from antiquity to the present. This course will explore the incredibly diverse ways that human beings have sought to make meaning out of this book. We will begin by devoting several class sessions to a close reading of Genesis in its entirety—just us and the text (mostly). We will then proceed to examine significant interpretations of Genesis chronologically. We will actually begin this survey of interpretations “before” Genesis, with the creation and flood myths of ancient Israel’s neighbors and predecessors, and then proceed to: ancient Jewish rewritings of Genesis from the Dead Sea Scrolls and other apocryphal texts; Philo of Alexandria’s re-reading of Genesis in light of Greek philosophy; writings from the New Testament indebted to Genesis, particularly the Gospel of John and Paul’s Letter to the Romans; the “reversal” of Genesis’s creation story found in the Gnostic Christian writing Apocryphon of John; the allegorical and typological appropriation of Genesis by the brilliant early Christian exegete Origen of Alexandria; the understandings of Genesis in ancient rabbinic Judaism; Genesis in the writings of Augustine, arguably the greatest Christian theologian of all time, on Genesis; the interpretation of Genesis in the Qur’an and other early Islamic writings; Genesis in medieval Christian thought; the beginnings of the historical-critical approach to Genesis in the seventeenth century with Baruch Spinoza; the role that interpretation of Genesis has played in American political debates from the colonial era until the present; the challenge posed to literal readings of Genesis by Darwin’s Origin of Species; recent readings of Genesis informed by feminism, liberation theology, and environmentalism; creative retellings of Genesis in contemporary literature, art, music, and film.

 

Grading

  • Attendance (20%)
  • Participations (20%)
  • Writing Assignments (20%)
  • Rough Draft of Final Term Paper (20%)
  • Revised Final Term Paper (20%)

 

Texts

  • Ronald Hendel, The Book of Genesis: A Biography.
  • Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, “They Say / I Say”: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing.
  • Lynne Truss, Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation.
  • Roy Peter Clarke, Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer.
  • Robert Alter, Genesis: Translation and Commentary
  • A number of readings will be available as PDFs on the “Files” page of the course website.
  • The New Interpreter’s Study Bible is optional.

CTI 310 • History Of Religions Of Asia

33740 • Freiberger, Oliver
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.122
(also listed as ANS 301R, R S 302)
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Description: 

This course offers a survey of the major religious traditions of Asia (Hinduism, Buddhism in South and East Asia, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shinto). It focuses on the historical development of their beliefs, practices, rituals, and customs in social context. The course will combine lectures with class discussions on readings.

Course materials:

  1. Willard G. Oxtoby, Roy C. Amore, eds. World Religions: Eastern Traditions. 3rd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.
  2. R. K. Narayan, The Mahabharata: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Indian Epic. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2000.
  3. Zhuangzi: Basic Writings, translated by Burton Watson. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003.
  4. Readings provided as PDF files on CANVAS

Grading:

  • Attendance/participation: 20%
  • Two quizzes: 20% (10% each)
  • Two short essays: 20% (10% each)
  • Midterm exam: 20%
  • Final exam: 20%

CTI 310 • Intro To Philos Of Religion

33770 • Phillips, Stephen
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 302
(also listed as PHL 305, R S 305)
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An examination of principal issues in contemporary philosophy of religion with special attention to religious pluralism. The views and arguments of Western theologians and philosophers will be taken up along with claims and concepts growing out of Eastern religions (Buddhism and Hinduism, in particular). Special topics include different views of the nature of a Divine Reality, arguments of rational theology, mysticism, and the theological problem of evil.


CTI 310 • Intro To The New Testament

33745 • Landau, Brent
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 0.102
(also listed as C C 304C, R S 315N)
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This course introduces students to the academic study of the 27 writings that today comprise the Christian New Testament in their first-century historical context. We will begin by considering the distinctive ways in which biblical scholars read and interpret these texts, and also by exploring the political and religious background to the birth of Christianity. We will then address what can be known about the historical individual known as Jesus of Nazareth and examine how the gospels reinterpret his significance for Christians living several decades after Jesus’ death. The next segment of the course introduces students to the letters and thought of the Apostle Paul, a figure as important for the beginnings of Christianity as Jesus (if not more so). The course concludes with a look at the other writings that comprise the NT, including the Book of Revelation, and also reflects on what we know about the process by which the NT became fixed in its canonical form. The primary goal of the course is to develop the skill of reading each of the NT writings as a distinctive, individual text (which may or may not agree with other NT texts).

 

Grading

  • Class attendance and participation: 15%
  • Quizzes: 15% total, 2.5% each
  • Short-response papers: 25% total, 8.33% eachE
  • xams: 45% total, 15% each

 

Text

  • Jewish Annotated New Testament (abbreviated JANT).**Even if you have a Bible, you are required to purchase this one.
  • Optional:Dale Martin, New Testament History and Literature and/or Raymond Brown, Introduction to the New Testament.

CTI 310 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33755 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 308
(also listed as C C 301)
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This course introduces students to the history, the culture, the religion, and above all the thought of the ancient Greeks. In studying the Greeks, we will have a twofold goal. First, we will try to develop a better understanding of a society which is in some ways very different from our own, but which is very much like it in others, and will exercises an influence over us that is still easy to see. Second, we will engage the Greeks as fellow students of enduring questions that still matter to us today—questions about justice, love, the divine, and the nature of the world. In that way, we will try to learn from them about ourselves.

The material for this course will consist almost entirely of primary sources. We will begin with a unit on Greek history in which we will try to see what was unique about the Greeks, and what they saw as unique about themselves. For that, we will look at selections from Herodotus and Thucydides. We will then study closely some of the chief literary and philosophic works of ancient Greece, including Homer’s Odyssey, Sophocles’ Antigone, and three of Plato’s dialogues: the Apology of Socrates, the Gorgias, and the Symposium.

In addition to the readings, students will be expected to learn the Greek alphabet and some very basic Greek vocabulary based on the readings we do for class.

This will be a small, discussion intensive class. Students will be expected to read carefully for every class meeting so that they can participate actively in discussions.

Texts:

Herodotus and Thucydides, Selections

Homer, Odyssey

Sophocles, Antigone

Plato, Apology of Socrates, Gorgias, and Symposium

Course Requirements:

Two papers (25% each)

Final exam (25%)

Short writing assignments (15%)

Attendance, quizzes, and class participation (10%)

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.  It also fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.


CTI 310 • Western Civ In Modern Times

33765 • Brower, Benjamin
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM JGB 2.216
(also listed as HIS 309L)
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In this course students will gain an understanding of European history over the last five centuries. We will investigate a range of significant developments in the social, cultural, and economic history of the European continent and beyond.  Lectures and readings will proceed chronologically from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century.  This time frame is marked by Europe’s growing global hegemony, manifest in forces such as colonialism and industrial capitalism, making its history of world historical importance.  The institutions of the modern state appeared at the beginning of our period, and they were accompanied by an uneven process of social and political transformation marked by the “dual revolutions,” the French and Industrial Revolutions at the end of the eighteenth century. The course will look at these processes along with the emergence of a class-based society in the nineteenth century.  We will also investigate intellectual and cultural forces such as modern ideologies of rupture and the trend toward secular thought.  We conclude with the contemporary period, an age marked in Europe by material abundance but plagued by unequal social relations and enduring social discontent.

Texts:

Joshua Cole and Carol Symes, Western Civilizations: Their History & Their Culture, Vol. 2, 18th ed.

Grades:

Midterm                      30%                

Final Exam                  30%

Writing                        30%

Participation               10%


CTI 320 • Classical Quest For Justice

33775 • Stauffer, Devin
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.134
(also listed as GOV 351C)
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GOV 351C (and CTI 320)

 

The Classical Quest for Justice

 

Devin Stauffer

 

 

Course Description 

 

What is justice?  What are its demands as a virtue of individuals?  What is its status as a guiding principle of domestic politics and as a restraint in times of war?  What are the strengths and weaknesses of different kinds of political orders in their quest for justice?  What is the relationship between political life and philosophic reflection?  In this course we will consider these fundamental and enduring questions of political philosophy primarily through a careful study of two of the masterpieces of classical antiquity:  Plato’s Republic and Thucydides’ The Peloponnesian War.  We will preface our study of these two great texts with a look at another work, Plato’s Apology of Socrates; but our focus will be on reading and discussing the Republic and The Peloponnesian War.  These works will be approached, not just as crucial documents for our understanding of a distant age, but as works that still speak directly and profoundly to permanent questions of moral and political life.   

 

Prerequisite

 

Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework.

 

Texts 

 

Plato and Aristophanes, Four Texts on Socrates, trans. by T. West and G. West (Cornell) 

Plato, The Republic of Plato, trans. by Allan Bloom (Basic Books)

Thucydides, The Landmark Thucydides, ed. By Robert Strassler (The Free Press) 

 

Requirements and Grading 

 

Paper: 20%  

First exam: 25%

Second exam: 25% 

Attendance: 10% 

Participation: 10%

Quizzes: 10%

 

(Note:  These percentages are approximate, and the paper may be made optional.)


CTI 321 • Theor Foundtns Modern Politics

33781 • Dempsey, Erik
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 201
(also listed as GOV 351D)
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Theoretical Foundations of Modern Politics

 

This class explores the philosophic basis of modern politics. We will look at how modern political philosophy broke with both classical and traditional Christian thought, in the new understanding of human nature that it proposed and the new approach to politics that it defended on that basis.

 

Our focus for the first part of the class will be on the works of Niccolo Machiavelli. We will read The Prince and a substantial part of the Discourses on Livy, and will use selected passages from ancient political philosophers and from the Christian tradition, including readings from the Bible, as points of comparison.

 

In the second part of the course, we will look at some of Machiavelli’s heirs and how they appropriated and modified his thought, eventually laying the foundations of liberal democracy. Our readings will include Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. We will end by looking briefly at one of the great critics of modern political life, Friederich Nietzsche.

 

Texts:

  • Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince and Discourse on Livy (Mansfield translation)
  • Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan
  • John Locke, Second Treatise of Government
  • Friederich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra

 

Course Requirements:

  • Short paper (25%)
  • Midterm Exam (25%)
  • Final Exam (35%)
  • Attendance and Frequent Quizzes (15%)

 


CTI 335 • Hegel: Formatn Mod Eur Iden

33790 • Gregg, Benjamin
Meets MW 4:00PM-5:30PM GAR 3.116
(also listed as EUS 348, GOV 335M)
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A core element of European identity is the notion of freedom in two forms that developed in the modern era: freedom as (a) the individual’s self-determination within his or her private sphere and personal life and (b) the community’s self-determination as a public achievement of private citizens come together to deliberate and decide matters of the res publica. In theory and history, the realization of such freedom has always been fraught with difficulty. Hegel’s Philosophy of Right offers one of the most compelling diagnoses of the ills of modern Western political community with respect to these two freedoms. It also develops some of the most influential standards by which to judge the civil society that undergirds modern European political community and its claims to provide these two freedoms.

Required Texts

G.W.F. Hegel, Philosophy of Right, trans. T.M. Knox (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1967; ISBN 978-0195002768) ▪ Or in the original language: Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts oder Naturrecht und Staatswissenschaft im Grundrisse (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1986)

Axel Honneth, The Pathologies of Individual Freedom: Hegel’s Social Theory (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010) ▪ Or in the original language: Leiden an Unbestimmtheit. Eine Reaktualisierung der Hegelschen Rechtsphilosophie (Ditzingen: Reclam, 2001)


CTI 335 • Women Hist Polit Thought

33795 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122
(also listed as GOV 335M, WGS 345)
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Course Description: Women in the History of Political Thought

 

This course will examine the themes of women, the family, and the private sphere in the history of political theory. We will analyze and interpret works of political theory in which women have a central role, and we will seek to understand the relationship between political thinkers’ views about women and the family and their larger political theories. We will begin in classical Greece with political theory and drama. Then we will move through history, considering the critiques of paternalism launched by Hobbes and Locke and the portrait of the ideal woman advanced by Rousseau in Book V of the Emile. In the second half of the course, we will consider the development of early feminism in the writings of Mary Wollstonecraft, Henrik Ibsen, John Stuart Mill, and Simone de Beauvoir. Some of the questions we will pursue are the following: What does justice demand in the realm of the relations between the sexes, and what kinds of social and political arrangements are best for women? How do our answers to these questions intersect with broader questions about human nature, identity, political community, and justice?

  Required Texts

 

A Course Reader

 

De Beauvoir, Simone. The Second Sex. (Vintage)

 

Euripides II. (Complete Greek Tragedies, Chicago)

 

Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. Herland. (Penguin Classics)

 

Ibsen, Henrik. A Doll’s House and Other Plays. (Penguin Classics)

 

Mill, John Stuart. The Subjection of Women. Edited by Susan M. Okin (Hackett)

 

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Emile, or On Education. Translated by Allan Bloom. (Basic Books)

 

Wollstonecraft, Mary. A Vindication of the Rights of Women. (Prometheus)

 

Course Requirements and Grading

 

First Exam: 30%

Second Exam: 30%

Paper: 30%

Class Participation (including pop quizzes): 10%


CTI 345 • Dante

33800 • Raffa, Guy
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.122
(also listed as E 366D, EUS 347, ITC 349)
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Dante: Fall 2016

ITC 349, same as E 366D, crosslisted with EUS 347 and CTI 345

Professor Guy Raffa, Dept. of French and Italian

E-mail: guyr@utexas.edu; Home Page: http://guyraffa.la.utexas.edu

The Divine Comedy offers a remarkable panorama of the late Middle Ages through one man's poetic vision of the afterlife. However, we continue to read and study the poem not only to learn about the thought and culture of medieval and early modern Europe but also because many of the issues confronting Dante and his age are no less important to individuals and societies today. Personal and civic responsibilities, governmental accountability, church-state relations, economics and social justice, Dante's influence on artists and other writers, benefits and limitations of interdisciplinarity—these are some of the themes that will frame our discussion of the Divine Comedy. Although you will read the poem in English, a bilingual edition will enable you to study and learn famous lines in the original Italian. The course is taught in English and contains flags for Writing and Global Cultures.

Danteworlds (http://danteworlds.laits.utexas.edu/): In addition to detailed entries, audio recordings, and study questions, this Web site contains hundreds of images from works by Sandro Botticelli, an anonymous 16th-century artist, John Flaxman, William Blake, Gustave Dorè, and Suloni Robertson.

Through close reading, class discussion, and the use of Danteworlds, you are expected to identify and explain the significance of major characters, references, and ideas in Dante's Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) and Vita Nuova. You will be tested on this ability in responses to study questions (a low-stakes writing assignment) and two in-class exams. An essay, which you will rewrite based on my feedback, will assess your ability to support an interpretation of a specific aspect of Dante's poetry with detailed textual analysis and scholarly research. A peer-editing activity will help you to revise and edit your own work. I expect you to have read the assigned cantos and reviewed the corresponding material in Danteworlds (including the study questions) before class.

Required Texts: (you must use the editions of these texts ordered for the class)

            Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso (Trans. Allen Mandelbaum)

            Vita Nuova (Trans. Barbara Reynolds)

Recommended Text: The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the "Divine Comedy" (Raffa)

Canvas: We will use the CANVAS learning management system to organize and provide course content on-line. When you log in to Canvas (http://canvas.utexas.edu/) and select the course, you will have access to the syllabus, assignments, lecture presentations (pdf), grades, and a discussion forum (for posting responses to study questions). You will be required to submit most assignments on-line using Canvas.

Assignments and Computation of Grade:

10%: 1500-word essay on the Inferno (credit for successful completion)

25%: Major rewrite of this essay incorporating scholarly research (graded)

5%:   Annotated bibliography of research sources (credit for successful completion)

5%:   Peer-review (credit for successful completion)

10%: Responses to study questions in Canvas Discussion Forum (credit for successful completion)

30%: Two in-class examinations  (graded: 15% each)

15%: Classwork and participation

 


CTI 350 • Masterworks Of World Drama

33815 • Lang, Elon
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.212
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Course Description and Objectives:

In our media-saturated culture, we encounter drama everyday on the various screens we watch as we live our modern lives. Although these shows and films may seem far removed from the theatrical stage, when we watch these dramas we are participating in a phenomenon that has been a principle means by which Western culture has described and perpetuated itself for over 2,500 years.

 

In this course we will focus our investigation of drama upon a perennial subject of the dramatic arts: the nature and pursuit of justice. We will seek to examine how different playwrights from different eras of Western literature have balanced elements like mercy, vengeance, fairness, due process, authority, altruism, noble character, prejudice, public opinion, and public service in their definitions of justice. Students will consider whether the dramas in selected ancient, Renaissance, and modern plays present idealistic, realistic, or polemical portrayals of how “justice is served.” We will discuss whether these dramas critique or celebrate the courts and other means society uses to define justice, to defend it, and to enforce laws and codes of conduct. We will bookend the semester by examining the way justice is portrayed being served by the American criminal justice system in contemporary pop-culture dramas (e.g. Law and Order) and the way drama instruction is used in some American prisons to facilitate rehabilitation among inmates.

 

Since no single course can exhaustively cover the subject of “dramatic masterworks in the Western tradition,” we will emphasize two major goals: (1) to develop critical and analytical skills that can be applied to all forms of literary art, (2) to broaden an understanding of drama’s civic value that can be gained from teaching and studying the classics or using drama as a pedagogical tool. To this end, course requirements will include close reading and in-class discussion of plays, light exploration of philosophies of justice, attendance at one assigned evening performance of a Shakespeare play presented by Actors from the London Stage, informal acting, written analysis, and (particularly for UTEACH student) the option to develop your own lesson plans.

 

Possible readings and video studies will include selections from:

  • Aeschylus, The Oresteia
  • Aristotle, Poetics and Nichomachean Ethics
  • Sophocles, Oedipus the King
  • Euripedes, Herakles
  • The York Mystery Plays
  • Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Merchant of Venice, The Tempest
  • Henrik Ibsen, Pillars of the Community
  • Arthur Miller, The Crucible
  • Reginald Rose, Twelve Angry Men
  • David Mamet, Oleanna
  • Law and Order
  • Shakespeare Behind Bars

 

 Course Requirements and Evaluation: 

Participation, Preparation, Punctuality: 10 pts. 

  • Regular class attendance and adherence to the policy in the syllabus, careful preparation of the readings, timely submission of all written work, and active participation in class discussions and activities.

Written Assignments: 50 pts.

  • Four essays of various lengths will be assigned totaling 15-20 pages, the second and fourth of these will be revised, expanded, and resubmitted after receiving feedback from both peers and the instructor.

Dramatic Reading: 10 pts.

  • In small groups, students will meet with the instructor to select a section of dialogue from a text being covered during their assigned week. Each group will practice their dialogue outside class and present it dramatically in an out-of-class meeting with the instructor.

Exams: 30 pts. (15 pts. midterm, 15 pts. final)

  • The primary focus of both exams will be to assess students’ intellectual engagement with the texts (i.e. understanding of key concepts, synthesis of ideas based upon close reading of the text, etc.). Exams will also assess thoroughness of reading, retention of reading, and engagement with lecture content and class discussions.

 

Your total score for the class will then be calculated as a percentage of 100 points possible, and placed on a standard letter grading scale: A=93+, A-=90-92, B+=87-89, B=83-86, B-=80-82, C+=77-79, C=73-76, C-70-72, D+=67-69, D=63-66, D-=60-62, F=59 points or fewer.


CTI 350 • Masterworks Of World Drama

33820 • Lang, Elon
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM MEZ 1.212
show description

Course Description and Objectives:

In our media-saturated culture, we encounter drama everyday on the various screens we watch as we live our modern lives. Although these shows and films may seem far removed from the theatrical stage, when we watch these dramas we are participating in a phenomenon that has been a principle means by which Western culture has described and perpetuated itself for over 2,500 years.

 

In this course we will focus our investigation of drama upon a perennial subject of the dramatic arts: the nature and pursuit of justice. We will seek to examine how different playwrights from different eras of Western literature have balanced elements like mercy, vengeance, fairness, due process, authority, altruism, noble character, prejudice, public opinion, and public service in their definitions of justice. Students will consider whether the dramas in selected ancient, Renaissance, and modern plays present idealistic, realistic, or polemical portrayals of how “justice is served.” We will discuss whether these dramas critique or celebrate the courts and other means society uses to define justice, to defend it, and to enforce laws and codes of conduct. We will bookend the semester by examining the way justice is portrayed being served by the American criminal justice system in contemporary pop-culture dramas (e.g. Law and Order) and the way drama instruction is used in some American prisons to facilitate rehabilitation among inmates.

 

Since no single course can exhaustively cover the subject of “dramatic masterworks in the Western tradition,” we will emphasize two major goals: (1) to develop critical and analytical skills that can be applied to all forms of literary art, (2) to broaden an understanding of drama’s civic value that can be gained from teaching and studying the classics or using drama as a pedagogical tool. To this end, course requirements will include close reading and in-class discussion of plays, light exploration of philosophies of justice, attendance at one assigned evening performance of a Shakespeare play presented by Actors from the London Stage, informal acting, written analysis, and (particularly for UTEACH student) the option to develop your own lesson plans.

 

Possible readings and video studies will include selections from:

  • Aeschylus, The Oresteia
  • Aristotle, Poetics and Nichomachean Ethics
  • Sophocles, Oedipus the King
  • Euripedes, Herakles
  • The York Mystery Plays
  • Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Merchant of Venice, The Tempest
  • Henrik Ibsen, Pillars of the Community
  • Arthur Miller, The Crucible
  • Reginald Rose, Twelve Angry Men
  • David Mamet, Oleanna
  • Law and Order
  • Shakespeare Behind Bars

 

 Course Requirements and Evaluation: 

Participation, Preparation, Punctuality: 10 pts. 

  • Regular class attendance and adherence to the policy in the syllabus, careful preparation of the readings, timely submission of all written work, and active participation in class discussions and activities.

Written Assignments: 50 pts.

  • Four essays of various lengths will be assigned totaling 15-20 pages, the second and fourth of these will be revised, expanded, and resubmitted after receiving feedback from both peers and the instructor.

Dramatic Reading: 10 pts.

  • In small groups, students will meet with the instructor to select a section of dialogue from a text being covered during their assigned week. Each group will practice their dialogue outside class and present it dramatically in an out-of-class meeting with the instructor.

Exams: 30 pts. (15 pts. midterm, 15 pts. final)

  • The primary focus of both exams will be to assess students’ intellectual engagement with the texts (i.e. understanding of key concepts, synthesis of ideas based upon close reading of the text, etc.). Exams will also assess thoroughness of reading, retention of reading, and engagement with lecture content and class discussions.

 

Your total score for the class will then be calculated as a percentage of 100 points possible, and placed on a standard letter grading scale: A=93+, A-=90-92, B+=87-89, B=83-86, B-=80-82, C+=77-79, C=73-76, C-70-72, D+=67-69, D=63-66, D-=60-62, F=59 points or fewer.


CTI 375 • Archaic/Classical Greece

33826-33829 • Palaima, Thomas
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 214
(also listed as AHC 325, HIS 354E)
show description

Studying ancient Greek history gives us the chance to view in microcosm all the variablesthat affect the course of history at other times in other places. We can see human beings and human societies at their best and worst, understand how power works in human societies, weigh decisions and outcomes and how they are made, observe different kinds of political and economic systems, and consider how cultural values are shaped and what influence they have on what human beings do. We shall study the origins of democracy and de-mystify what ancient democracy was. The history of Greece is also a history of warfare and competition. This course surveys Greek history from the palatial period of the late Bronze Age through the ‘Dark Ages’ and the 'polis' period to the rise of Macedonia.

We shall first look at the geography of Greece and how that affects cultural developments. We always want to ask, “What was it like to be alive in these times and places? How did these historical actors (named and anonymous) live within their world?”

We shall also puzzle over how to interpret the often very uneven and very peculiar evidence for the social, political and economic systems that develop in different districts of Greece in 'prehistoric' and historical times.

Throughout we shall be making use of Herodotus, the father of history, and Thucydides, the father of scientific history, as (1)  cultural texts and documents; (2) as insights into the behaviors of human beings and societies in times of crisis and stress; and (3) as inventors of the discipline of history and experimenters with how it is best practiced. We shall also read excerpts from authors like Homer and Hesiod (epic poetry of two different kinds), Solon, Tyrtaeus, Callinus and Archilochus (social song poets), Plutarch (ancient biography), and Greek tragedians.


CTI 375 • Enlightenment & Revolution

33830 • Vaughn, James
Meets T 5:00PM-8:00PM GAR 2.128
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 350L)
show description

This seminar course examines the relationship between the intellectual project of the Enlightenment and the political and social transformations that unfolded in western Europe and North America from the beginnings of the Dutch Revolt in the 1560s to the decade following the Paris Commune of 1871.  What was the connection between intellectual enlightenment and social-political revolution in the West?  The central theme of the course is the contemporary intellectual comprehension of far-reaching social, political, and economic change.  The seminar sessions involve close readings and extensive discussions of the writings of major European intellectuals who sought to understand, analyze, and criticize the upheavals and transformations taking place around them.  Authors read and discussed include Hugo Grotius, René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Bernard Mandeville, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Adam Smith, Immanuel Kant, Benjamin Constant, G. W. F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx.

Texts:

René Descartes, Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy (Hackett, 2011).

John Locke, Political Writings (Hackett, 2003).

Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees and Other Writings (Hackett, 1997).

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Basic Political Writings (Hackett, 1987).

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Univ. Chicago Press, 1977).

Immanuel Kant, Perpetual Peace and Other Essays (Hackett, 1983).

Benjamin Constant, Political Writings (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1988).

G. W. F. Hegel, Introduction to the Philosophy of History (Hackett, 1988).

Robert C. Tucker, ed., The Marx-Engels Reader (W. W. Norton, 1978).

Grading:

1. Class attendance and participation – 30% of final grade.

2. Weekly reading responses – 20% of final grade.

3. Mid-term analytical essay – 20% of final grade.

4. Final analytical essay – 30% of final grade.


CTI 375 • Hist Of Rome: The Republic

33835-33850 • Riggsby, Andrew
Meets MW 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ B0.306
(also listed as AHC 325, HIS 321M)
show description

Covers the period from Rome's foundation through Caesar's murder in 44 B.C.  The emphasis placed on the last two centuries of the Republic when problems accumulated and solutions did not.  All the factors contributing to the Republic's fall will discussed:  political, military, social, economic, religious, etc..

This course carries the Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.


CTI 375 • Italy Masters: Lit/Film/Art

33853 • Carter, Daniela
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM HRH 2.112
(also listed as EUS 347, ITC 349)
show description

CTI 375/ITC 349                     Italian Masterpieces                                  Fall 2016

           

Intructor: Daniela Bini Carter; Office Hours in HRH 3.112C: Th 3:30-6:00

            & by appointment; office phone: 512/471-5995; home: 512/477-8649

 

From Michelangelo’s spectacular paintings of the Sistine Chapel and Bernini’s moving sculpture of Apollo and Daphne, to the intense music of Puccini’s Tosca and the fantastic imagination of Fellini’s La dolce vita, Italy has given the world an unparalleled abundance of masterpieces in all the arts. This course will examine some of them in details touching on painting, sculpture, architecture, opera and cinema. Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel, Caravaggio’s provocative religious paintings, Renato Guttuso’s scenes of Sicily, Lorenzo Bernini’s “Apollo and Daphne” and “The Ecstasy of Saint Theresa,” are only a few of the visual treasures we will study. We will sample the greatest Italian poetry of Giacomo Leopardi’s and Nobel Laureate Eugenio Montale; narrative with novels by Italo Svevo and Italo Calvino; and theater with plays of Luigi Pirandello (another Nobel prize winner who revolutionized the theater in the 20th century). Since the most popular art form in the 19th century Italy was opera, we shall study selected  masterpieces by Italy’s two most renowned opera composers: Giuseppe Verdi and Giacomo Puccini. The course will conclude with the films La dolce vita and 8 and a half by Federico Fellini. The aim of the course is not only to familiarize students with the richness of Italian culture, but also to inspire them to continue exploring it.

 

Grade Computation: Two exams 60%; Short quizzes 10%; One Research Paper 20%; Class Participation 10%

 

Texts:

Giacomo Leopardi: Poems - on Canvas

Eugenio Montale: Poems - on Canvas

Italo Svevo: Zeno’s Conscience

(Italo Calvino: Palomar)

Luigi Pirandello: The Late Mattia Pascal

_____________It is so (if you think so), Six Characters in Search of an Author

Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa: The Leopard

Libretti of operas on line

Works of art on Canvas (in Power Point) and some critical essays on Canvas

 


CTI 375 • Machiavelli

33859 • Frazier, Alison
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.132
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 350L, LAH 350, R S 357)
show description

This upper-division research seminar takes students through Niccolò Machiavelli’s chief writings. We consider the local, regional, Mediterranean, European, and global aspects of his work. Through class discussion and short written assignments (20%), students will identify a research topic in consultation with the professor.

There are no prerequisites but His 343g “Italian Renaissance” (offered Spr 2016) is strongly recommended.

Texts:

Readings will include:

Machiavelli: The Prince; The Discourses; The Art of War; Mandragola; Clizia; The Florentine Histories; selected letters and short writings (buy the required translations)

Black: Machiavelli (the best recent biography)

Najemy, ed.: Cambridge Companion to Machiavelli

Course packet of scholarly articles

Grading:

Each student will write a historiography essay (15%); draft a prospectus (20%); and complete a major research paper (30%). Students will give two oral presentations, one at the prospectus stage (5%), and one upon completion of the research paper (10%).