The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas

Michael W Adams


Associate ProfessorPh.D., 1973, The University of Texas at Austin

Associate Professor of English
Michael W Adams

Contact

Interests


Legal writing; history of Western thought; the Bible as literature; the modern short story; the modern American novel

Biography


Director, Dobie Paisano Fellowship Program

Associate Director, James A. Michener Center for Writers

Columnist, Bar Association of the Fifth Federal Circuit

Novelist: Blind Man's Bluff; Anniversaries in the Blood 

Courses


E 380F • Literature For Writers

35610 • Fall 2016
Meets TH 9:00AM-12:00PM GAR 2.124

The Bible as Literature

This course is a thorough literary exploration of the Bible as literary text—its origin and profound consequences. The journey will take us down four paths. The first is an examination of the literary aspects of the Old Testament, which will include canonical poetry (one-third of the Hebrew Bible) in which the fundamental and formal feature is what we call parallelism of members; historical accounts (some invented, some true), in which etiological stories (stories of explanation) play such an important role; prophecy (the seed-bed of future theology) and its overt use of metaphor, symbol, and hyperbole; books of wisdom (some surprisingly modern); and short stories in which the narrative techniques distinguish each author.  Secondly, we will turn to the New Testament, which will give us a new genre—the gospel (that defines itself with the use of proof texts, topology, sayings, miracle stories, etc.) and an old genre, the Hellenistic-style letters of Paul which include the incorporating of Stoic virtues as well as the Stoic epistolary technique of diatribe.

The third path will take us on an exploration of the ideas contained therein that produced the Jewish, Christian and to some extent Muslim version of reality. Thus we’ll explore the literary origin and evolution of things like the soul, Satan, hell, heaven, bodily resurrection, the Trinity, Grace, Jesus-as-God, faith, original sin, linear time, messianism, judgment day, etc.

And finally, we’ll trace the creation and evolution of four of these concepts as they move from literary expression to interpretation to dogma, to theology, to a specific psychology that, surprisingly, leads to the dominant literary technique within the work of four writers:  Anne Sexton, Flannery O’Connor, Par Lagerkvist, and Nathanael West.

Requirements:

Each student will be required to lead three brief discussions over topics or chapters assigned (more detail to follow).  Be prepared to read. Remember that in one class session we are covering material for three one-hour classes.

Students will write:  two psalms based on two of the ancient forms; a short story based on or influenced by or inspired by one or more of the stories harbored in the Old Testament; and one analytical or reflective essay generated by the content of the New Testament.  Students who need the course to meet the Michener requirement of analytical writing will work with me individually on a series of options. All written work will be averaged together for a final grade. Note that we will read Exodus for the FIRST day of class.

Attendance is required.  Each unexcused absence (which includes almost everything except the parting of the Red Sea and the Virgin Birth) will result in five points deducted from the final average.

Text:  The New Jerusalem Bible (not The Jerusalem Bible)

            Flannery O’Connor, Everything that Rises Must Converge

            Par Lagerkvist, Barabbas

            Anne Sexton, selected poems I will provide

            Nathanael West, Miss Lonelyhearts

LAH 350 • In Search Of Meaning

29215 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as HMN 350)

This is a course that asks a lot of questions. And it questions all the answers. Ifyou are uncomfortable being asked questions (about your beliefs, your personal meaning) and reluctant to ask the tough questions of others, this may not be the course for you. 

We will begin by establishing (as best as history tells us) how what we recognize as western reality came into existence, how the foundation was laid and when. The concepts will include: monotheism; original sin; heaven; hell; salvation, etc. After we establish how and when these and a host of other foundational features came into existence and created what we call judeo-Christian  reality, we will contrast the reality created therein with other realities- Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam.

The we turn back to the West and explore writer and philosophers who reject the institutionally handed down judeo-Christian  reality, and try to put something in its place (Humanism, Deism,   Transcendentalism, Existentialism, Nihilism, Eurekans crystal worshippers, etc.) or find a kind of consolation in atheism or, and often most ignored, a noble kind of Aesthetic Humanism. This journey will lead us to what Pars Lagerkvist called the central question of the modern mind-How do we find meani ng in a meaningless world? We will spend some special time exploring your answers to this question. And, to be fair, at the end of the semester I'll give you my answer (which is the right answer, of course - hint: to err is human, to forgive, canine). AND I'll let you interrogate me, as I will have interrogated you during the semester. 

Texts and Works: (assigned readings from)

The Old Testament (selections); Plato, Crito. Phaedo; India's "Vedic Hymns," "The kena-Upanishad" and "The Mahabharata" or the Bhagavad Gita; Cicero, "The Offices"; Lucreti us, "The Nature of Things"; the Gnostic texts (selections), The New Testament (selections), the "Nicaean Creed"; St. Augusti ne's City of God (selections); the Koran (selections); Erasmus, "The Praise of Folly", Pico della Mirandola "Of the Dignity of Man"; Nicolaus Copernicus, "The Revolutions of Heavenly Bodies"; Bruno, "Of the Infinite Universe and Innumerable Worlds"; Sir Francis Bacon, "Novum Organum:, Martin Luther, "Table Talk"; Thomas Paine, "The Age of Reason"; selections from Locke, d'Holbach, Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Anne Sexton, Edna St. Vincent Millaly; Herman Hesse, Siddhartha; Flannery O'Connor; selected stories; Dostoevsky's "Grand Inquisitor"; Pars Lagervist, Barabbas; Camus, The Stranger; Sartre, No Exit; Nathaniel West, Miss Lonelyhearts; Denis Johnson, Jesus' Son; Raymond Carver, selected stories; Don Delillo, White Noise.

Requirements and Grading Policy

Five analytical essays (4-8 pages) 75%

Quizzes 15%

Discussion 10%

Attendance required. Five point deduction from final average for every unexcused absence. Five point deduction from final average for three or more times late to class

E 348 • The Short Story

34505 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 206

E 348  l  The Short Story

Instructor:  Adams, M

Unique #:  34505

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The focus of this course is beauty and, consequently, the techniques used by short story writers to achieve it. Beauty, as I define it, means that the technique of a story matches what it comprehends. In this sense, one cannot separate the telling of the story from the story itself. Although we will review the various critical approaches to short fiction, the emphasis will always be upon the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the story-teller. We will read a minimum of three short stories per class. At three times during the semester, we will pause over several works by one writer--this semester, it will be Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, and Flannery O’Connor. The first half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to sharpen our contact with the human condition, even, perhaps, to make us more empathetic individuals. The second half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to make us think about the human condition and the nature of being itself. Though obviously these two emphases are not mutually exclusive, our discussions will vary from reflections on one’s personal experience to intellectual assumptions about one’s meaning in life—be it religious, philosophical, existential, etc.

Texts: Fiction 100, ed. James H. Pickering, 11th edition; Everything that Rises Must Converge, Flannery O’Connor; Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance is required. Unexcused absence results in a deduction of three points off the final grade—for each unexcused absence. Class discussion is highly valued. In many ways, this is the heart of the class, for it’s by this means that we share insights into the art of a fine story and insights into the human condition—especially our own. These discussions will be open, frank, and respectful. The discussion grade accounts for 10% of the final grade. This is based not on the number of times you contribute but on the quality of your insights and your willingness to share your thoughts. A careful reading of each story for each class is highly valued. To this end, pop quizzes will constitute 15% of your final grade. You must come to class fully prepared each class meeting. The quizzes will be over the readings due for that day. If you miss a quiz due to an excused absence, you must come by my office within one week from the missed class and take an oral quiz. If you’ve missed class with an excused absence for more than one day, you must, upon your return, arrange a time to make up any missed quizzes. These quizzes will result in a grade of pass or fail. If you score from 70-100, you will receive a pass in the grade book, which cannot be averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. If you score lower than a 70, that grade will be recorded in the grade book and averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. This protects the integrity and goal of the pop quizzes—to determine how prepared you were for class NOT knowing whether you would be given a quiz.

If you miss a quiz due to an unexcused absence, you will not be given a chance to make it up. A zero will be recorded in the grade book.

Requirements and Assignments: You will write five analytical essays (4-8 pages). These will be averaged together and constitute 75% of your final grade. Class discussion grade constitutes 10% of your final grade.  Pop quizzes constitute 15% of your final grade. I will ask each of you to lead the class discussion over an individual story.

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the official +/- rubric.

A

4 grade points

C

2 grade points

A-

3.67 grade points

C-

1.67 grade points

B+

3.33 grade points

D+

1.33 grade points

B

3 grade points

D

1 grade point

B-

2.67 grade points

D-

0.67 grade points

C+

2.33 grade points

F

0 grade points

Plagiarism: DON’T take a chance. Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated. I will go over this the first day of class, but every student should go to the following website to get a full account: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php.

LAH 350 • In Search Of Meaning

29560 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as HMN 350)

 

This is a course that asks a lot of questions.  And it questions all of the answers.  If you are uncomfortable being asked questions (about your beliefs, your personal meaning) and reluctant to ask the tough questions of others, this may not be the course for you.

We will begin by establishing (as best history tells us) how what we recognize as western reality came into existence, how the foundation was laid and when. The concepts will include: monotheism; the nature and personality of this god; the soul; chosen people; linear time; history as divine classroom; original sin; heaven; hell; salvation, etc.  After we establish how and when these and a host of other foundational features came into existence and created what we call Judeo-Christian reality, we will contrast the reality created therein with other realities--Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam.

Then we turn back to the West and explore writers and philosophers who reject the institutionally handed down Judeo-Christian reality, and try to put something in its place (Humanism, Deism, Transcendentalism, Existentialism, Nihilism, Eurekans, crystal worshippers, etc.) or find a kind of consolation in atheism or, and often most ignored, a noble kind of Aesthetic Humanism. This journey will lead us to what Pars Lagerkvist called the central question of the modern mind—How do we find meaning in a meaningless world?  We will spend some special time exploring your answers to this question. And, to be fair, at the end of the semester I’ll give you my answer (which is the right answer, of course—hint:  to err is human, to forgive, canine). AND I’ll let you interrogate me, as I will have interrogated you during the semester.

The Old Testament (selections); Plato, Crito, Phaedo; India's "Vedic Hymns," "The Kena-Upanishad," and "The Mahabharata" or theBhagavad Gita; Cicero, "The Offices"; Lucretius, "The Nature of Things"; the Gnostic texts (selections), The New Testament (selections), the "Nicaean Creed"; St. Augustine's City of God (selections); the Koran (selections);  Erasmus, "The Praise of Folly"; Pico della Mirandola "Of the Dignity of Man"; Nicolaus Copernicus, "The Revolutions of Heavenly Bodies;" Bruno,  "Of the Infinite Universe and Innumerable Worlds"; Sir Francis Bacon, "Novum Organum"; Martin Luther, "Table Talk";   Thomas Paine, "The Age of Reason"; selections from Locke, d’Holbach, Planck, Bultman,Whitehead, Diderot and others; selected poems of Whitman, Paul Valery, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Anne Sexton, Edna St. Vincent Millay;  Herman  Hesse, Siddhartha; Flannery O’Connor, selected stories; Dostoevsky's "Grand Inquisitor"; Pars Lagervist, Barabbas; Camus, The Stranger; Sartre, No Exit; Nathaniel West, Miss Lonelyhearts; Denis Johnson, Jesus’ Son;Raymond Carver, selected stories; Don Delillo, White Noise.

PREREQUISITES:

Upper-division standing and a grade point average of at least 3.50.

RESTRICTIONS:

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts.

 

E 348 • The Short Story

35780 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 206

Instructor:  Adams, M

Unique #:  35780

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316L (or 316K), 316M (or 316K), 316N (or 316K), or 316P (or 316K), or T C 603B.

Description: The focus of this course is beauty and, consequently, the techniques used by short story writers to achieve it. Beauty, as I define it, means that the technique of a story matches what it comprehends. In this sense, one cannot separate the telling of the story from the story itself. Although we will review the various critical approaches to short fiction, the emphasis will always be upon the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the story-teller. We will read a minimum of three short stories per class. At three times during the semester, we will pause over several works by one writer--this semester, it will be Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, and Flannery O’Connor. The first half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to sharpen our contact with the human condition, even, perhaps, to make us more empathetic individuals. The second half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to make us think about the human condition and the nature of being itself. Though obviously these two emphases are not mutually exclusive, our discussions will vary from reflections on one’s personal experience to intellectual assumptions about one’s meaning in life—be it religious, philosophical, existential, etc.

Texts: Fiction 100, ed. James H. Pickering, 11th edition; Everything that Rises Must Converge, Flannery O’Connor; Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance is required. Unexcused absence results in a deduction of three points off the final grade—for each unexcused absence. Class discussion is highly valued. In many ways, this is the heart of the class, for it’s by this means that we share insights into the art of a fine story and insights into the human condition—especially our own. These discussions will be open, frank, and respectful. The discussion grade accounts for 10% of the final grade. This is based not on the number of times you contribute but on the quality of your insights and your willingness to share your thoughts. A careful reading of each story for each class is highly valued. To this end, pop quizzes will constitute 15% of your final grade. You must come to class fully prepared each class meeting. The quizzes will be over the readings due for that day. If you miss a quiz due to an excused absence, you must come by my office within one week from the missed class and take an oral quiz. If you’ve missed class with an excused absence for more than one day, you must, upon your return, arrange a time to make up any missed quizzes. These quizzes will result in a grade of pass or fail. If you score from 70-100, you will receive a pass in the grade book, which cannot be averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. If you score lower than a 70, that grade will be recorded in the grade book and averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. This protects the integrity and goal of the pop quizzes—to determine how prepared you were for class NOT knowing whether you would be given a quiz.

If you miss a quiz due to an unexcused absence, you will not be given a chance to make it up. A zero will be recorded in the grade book.

Requirements and Assignments: You will write five analytical essays (5-8 pages). These will be averaged together and constitute 75% of your final grade. The first essay may be dropped for the final averaging. You will be given the opportunity to revise. There will be some peer reading of each other’s work. The peer editing will include the following: For the first essay, each of you will bring five additional copies to class. I will distribute these to your classmates. Your classmates will edit, comment, and evaluate your essay. If, during the semester, I think it would be valuable for you to see the response of other students to your written work, I’ll ask for a clean copy to distribute. We’ll discuss the students’ responses in my office. Each student reads and comments on multiple essays, and also provides specific revision suggestions.

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 89.999.

A = 90 – above; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69.

Plagiarism: DON’T take a chance. Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated. I will go over this the first day of class, but every student should go to the following website to get a full account: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php

LAH 350 • In Search Of Meaning

30445 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as HMN 350)

This is a course that asks a lot of questions.  And it questions all of the answers.  If you are uncomfortable being asked questions (about your beliefs, your personal meaning) and reluctant to ask the tough questions of others, this may not be the course for you.

We will begin by establishing (as best history tells us) how what we recognize as western reality came into existence, how the foundation was laid and when. The concepts will include: monotheism; the nature and personality of this god; the soul; chosen people; linear time; history as divine classroom; original sin; heaven; hell; salvation, etc.  After we establish how and when these and a host of other foundational features came into existence and created what we call Judeo-Christian reality, we will contrast the reality created therein with other realities--Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam.

Then we turn back to the West and explore writers and philosophers who reject the institutionally handed down Judeo-Christian reality, and try to put something in its place (Humanism, Deism, Transcendentalism, Existentialism, Nihilism, Eurekans, crystal worshippers, etc.) or find a kind of consolation in atheism or, and often most ignored, a noble kind of Aesthetic Humanism. This journey will lead us to what Pars Lagerkvist called the central question of the modern mind—How do we find meaning in a meaningless world?  We will spend some special time exploring your answers to this question. And, to be fair, at the end of the semester I’ll give you my answer (which is the right answer, of course—hint:  to err is human, to forgive, canine). AND I’ll let you interrogate me, as I will have interrogated you during the semester.

The Old Testament (selections); Plato, Crito, Phaedo; India's "Vedic Hymns," "The Kena-Upanishad," and "The Mahabharata" or theBhagavad Gita; Cicero, "The Offices"; Lucretius, "The Nature of Things"; the Gnostic texts (selections), The New Testament (selections), the "Nicaean Creed"; St. Augustine's City of God (selections); the Koran (selections);  Erasmus, "The Praise of Folly"; Pico della Mirandola "Of the Dignity of Man"; Nicolaus Copernicus, "The Revolutions of Heavenly Bodies;" Bruno,  "Of the Infinite Universe and Innumerable Worlds"; Sir Francis Bacon, "Novum Organum"; Martin Luther, "Table Talk";   Thomas Paine, "The Age of Reason"; selections from Locke, d’Holbach, Planck, Bultman,Whitehead, Diderot and others; selected poems of Whitman, Paul Valery, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Anne Sexton, Edna St. Vincent Millay;  Herman  Hesse, Siddhartha; Flannery O’Connor, selected stories; Dostoevsky's "Grand Inquisitor"; Pars Lagervist, Barabbas; Camus, The Stranger; Sartre, No Exit; Nathaniel West, Miss Lonelyhearts; Denis Johnson, Jesus’ Son;Raymond Carver, selected stories; Don Delillo, White Noise.

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

35805 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM PAR 308

Instructor:  Adams, M            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35805            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The focus of this course is beauty and, consequently, the techniques used by short story writers to achieve it. Beauty, as I define it, means that the technique of a story matches what it comprehends. In this sense, one cannot separate the telling of the story from the story itself. Although we will review the various critical approaches to short fiction, the emphasis will always be upon the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the story-teller. We will read a minimum of three short stories per class. At three times during the semester, we will pause over several works by one writer--this semester, it will be Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, and Flannery O’Connor. The first half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to sharpen our contact with the human condition, even, perhaps, to make us more empathetic individuals. The second half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to make us think about the human condition and the nature of being itself. Though obviously these two emphases are not mutually exclusive, our discussions will vary from reflections on one’s personal experience to intellectual assumptions about one’s meaning in life—be it religious, philosophical, existential, etc.

Texts: Fiction 100, ed. James H. Pickering, 11th edition; Everything that Rises Must Converge, Flannery O’Connor; Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance is required. Unexcused absence results in a deduction of three points off the final grade—for each unexcused absence. Class discussion is highly valued. In many ways, this is the heart of the class, for it’s by this means that we share insights into the art of a fine story and insights into the human condition—especially our own. These discussions will be open, frank, and respectful. The discussion grade accounts for 10% of the final grade. This is based not on the number of times you contribute but on the quality of your insights and your willingness to share your thoughts. A careful reading of each story for each class is highly valued. To this end, pop quizzes will constitute 15% of your final grade. You must come to class fully prepared each class meeting. The quizzes will be over the readings due for that day. If you miss a quiz due to an excused absence, you must come by my office within one week from the missed class and take an oral quiz. If you’ve missed class with an excused absence for more than one day, you must, upon your return, arrange a time to make up any missed quizzes. These quizzes will result in a grade of pass or fail. If you score from 70-100, you will receive a pass in the grade book, which cannot be averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. If you score lower than a 70, that grade will be recorded in the grade book and averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. This protects the integrity and goal of the pop quizzes—to determine how prepared you were for class NOT knowing whether you would be given a quiz.

If you miss a quiz due to an unexcused absence, you will not be given a chance to make it up. A zero will be recorded in the grade book.

Requirements and Assignments: You will write five analytical essays (5-8 pages). These will be averaged together and constitute 75% of your final grade. The first essay may be dropped for the final averaging. You will be given the opportunity to revise. There will be some peer reading of each other’s work. The peer editing will include the following: For the first essay, each of you will bring five additional copies to class. I will distribute these to your classmates. Your classmates will edit, comment, and evaluate your essay. If, during the semester, I think it would be valuable for you to see the response of other students to your written work, I’ll ask for a clean copy to distribute. We’ll discuss the students’ responses in my office. Each student reads and comments on multiple essays, and also provides specific revision suggestions.

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 89.999.

A = 90 – above; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69.

Plagiarism: DON’T take a chance. Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated. I will go over this the first day of class, but every student should go to the following website to get a full account: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php

E F348 • 20th-Century Short Story

83550 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM SZB 416

Instructor:  Adams, M            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  83550            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The focus of this course is beauty and, consequently, the techniques used by short story writers to achieve it. Beauty, as I define it, means that the technique of a story matches what it comprehends. In this sense, one cannot separate the telling of the story from the story itself. Although we will review the various critical approaches to short fiction, the emphasis will always be upon the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the story-teller. We will read a minimum of three short stories per class. At three times during the semester, we will pause over several works by one writer--this semester, it will be Raymond Carver and Flannery O’Connor. The first half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to sharpen our contact with the human condition, even, perhaps, to make us more empathetic individuals. The second half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to make us think about the human condition and the nature of being itself. Though obviously these two emphases are not mutually exclusive, our discussions will vary from reflections on one’s personal experience to intellectual assumptions about one’s meaning in life—be it religious, philosophical, existential, etc.

Texts: Fiction 100, ed. James H. Pickering, 11th edition; Everything that Rises Must Converge, Flannery O’Connor;  

Requirements & Grading: Attendance is required. Unexcused absence results in a deduction of three points off the final grade—for each unexcused absence. Class discussion is highly valued. In many ways, this is the heart of the class, for it’s by this means that we share insights into the art of a fine story and insights into the human condition—especially our own. These discussions will be open, frank, and respectful. The discussion grade accounts for 10% of the final grade. This is based not on the number of times you contribute but on the quality of your insights and your willingness to share your thoughts. A careful reading of each story for each class is highly valued. To this end, pop quizzes will constitute 15% of your final grade. You must come to class fully prepared each class meeting. The quizzes will be over the readings due for that day. If you miss a quiz due to an excused absence, you must come by my office within one week from the missed class and take an oral quiz. If you’ve missed class with an excused absence for more than one day, you must, upon your return, arrange a time to make up any missed quizzes. These quizzes will result in a grade of pass or fail. If you score from 70-100, you will receive a pass in the grade book, which cannot be averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. If you score lower than a 70, that grade will be recorded in the grade book and averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. This protects the integrity and goal of the pop quizzes—to determine how prepared you were for class NOT knowing whether you would be given a quiz.

If you miss a quiz due to an unexcused absence, you will not be given a chance to make it up. A zero will be recorded in the grade book.

You will write three major analytical essays (4-8 pages). These will be averaged together and constitute 70% of your final grade. You will write two short response essays (2-3 pages). This will be averaged together and constitute 10% of your final grade. Regular pop quizzes will be added together and constitute 10% of your final grade. I will give a discussion grade sometime (unannounced) during the semester. This will constitute 10% of your final grade.

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 89.999.

A = 90 – above; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69.

Plagiarism: DON’T take a chance. Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated. I will go over this the first day of class, but every student should go to the following website to get a full account: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php

LAH 350 • In Search Of Meaning

30135 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as HMN 350)

Description

This is a course that asks a lot of questions.  And it questions all of the answers.  If you are uncomfortable being asked questions (about your beliefs, your personal meaning) and reluctant to ask the tough questions of others, this may not be the course for you.

We will begin by establishing (as best history tells us) how what we recognize as western reality came into existence, how the foundation was laid and when. The concepts will include: monotheism; the nature and personality of this god; the soul; chosen people; linear time; history as divine classroom; original sin; heaven; hell; salvation, etc.  After we establish how and when these and a host of other foundational features came into existence and created what we call Judeo-Christian reality, we will contrast the reality created therein with other realities--Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam.

Then we turn back to the West and explore writers and philosophers who reject the institutionally handed down Judeo-Christian reality, and try to put something in its place (Humanism, Deism, Transcendentalism, Existentialism, Nihilism, Eurekans, crystal worshippers, etc.) or find a kind of consolation in atheism or, and often most ignored, a noble kind of Aesthetic Humanism. This journey will lead us to what Pars Lagerkvist called the central question of the modern mind—How do we find meaning in a meaningless world?  We will spend some special time exploring your answers to this question. And, to be fair, at the end of the semester I’ll give you my answer (which is the right answer, of course—hint:  to err is human, to forgive, canine). AND I’ll let you interrogate me, as I will have interrogated you during the semester.

Texts

The Old Testament (selections); Plato, Crito, Phaedo; India's "Vedic Hymns," "The Kena-Upanishad," and "The Mahabharata" or theBhagavad Gita; Cicero, "The Offices"; Lucretius, "The Nature of Things"; the Gnostic texts (selections), The New Testament (selections), the "Nicaean Creed"; St. Augustine's City of God (selections); the Koran (selections);  Erasmus, "The Praise of Folly"; Pico della Mirandola "Of the Dignity of Man"; Nicolaus Copernicus, "The Revolutions of Heavenly Bodies;" Bruno,  "Of the Infinite Universe and Innumerable Worlds"; Sir Francis Bacon, "Novum Organum"; Martin Luther, "Table Talk";   Thomas Paine, "The Age of Reason"; selections from Locke, d’Holbach, Planck, Bultman,Whitehead, Diderot and others; selected poems of Whitman, Paul Valery, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Anne Sexton, Edna St. Vincent Millay;  Herman  Hesse, Siddhartha; Flannery O’Connor, selected stories; Dostoevsky's "Grand Inquisitor"; Pars Lagervist, Barabbas; Camus, The Stranger; Sartre, No Exit; Nathaniel West, Miss Lonelyhearts; Denis Johnson, Jesus’ Son;Raymond Carver, selected stories; Don Delillo, White Noise.

Grading  Five analytical essays (4-8 pages) 75%

  Quizzes         15%

  Discussion     10%

Attendance required. Five point deduction from final average for every unexcused absence. Five point deduction from final average for three or more times late to class.

LAH 350 • Clascl/Sriptl Bckgrnd Of Lit

30057 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM CBA 4.336
(also listed as E 350E)

Instructor:  Adams, M            Areas:  II / D

Unique #:  35490            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  English Honors

Cross-lists:  LAH 350            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

The subject of each class meeting may be determined from the assigned reading for the day (see course schedule). The instructor retains the right to vary this syllabus.

Description: The intellectual and cultural foundation of what we call the Western Mind has its origin within the ideas and literary and artistic forms established centuries ago by Greek and Judeo-Christian traditions. This course will explore those ideas and those literary forms as they continue to manifest themselves both singularly and as a complex union responsible for creating the psychological and aesthetic tension in important modern writers. Singularly we find the mental atmosphere established by the Judeo-Christian notions of monotheism, linear time, a sacred text of laws, Judgment Day, Hell and Heaven, Original Sin, a god of history, Satan, salvation, etc., found in literary forms like psalms, folk tales, etiological stories, prophetic poetry, lamentations, extended narratives, character sketches, gospels, and epistles. And we find the mental atmosphere of Greek notions of intellectual freedom, skepticism, Stoicism, democracy, philosophical inquiry, destiny, glory, honor, hospitality, fate, the heroic, etc., found in literary forms like tragedy, odes, the Sapphic, the elegy, the epic, philosophic tracts, and satire. But perhaps most important, we see prevalently in the modern mind a blending of these two mental atmospheres that have created some of our finest stories, plays, and poems as they encapsulate what some have called the sadness of sophistication tempered by the mercy of the imagination—“Need is not quite belief.”

            This exploration will take us back and forth from biblical and Greek and Roman literary texts to contemporary versions or rethinkings. Aeschylus’ Orestia; Eugene O’Neill’s Mourning Becomes Electra; the gospel of Mark and Pars Lagerkvist’s Barabbas; the biblical Lamentations and Anne Sexton’s The Jesus Papers; Ecclesiastes and Nathaniel West’s Miss Lonelyhearts; the biblical Job and Archibald MacLeish’s poetic drama J.B., the Garden of Eden story and Paul Valéry’s Sketch of the Serpent, and so on. In essence, this comparative look at ancient and modern literary devices, and the ideas they literally contain, is a study of the creative mind’s response to the mystery of being alive.

Readings selected from the following list: Large selections from Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey; Sophocles’ Antigone; Aeschylus’ Orestia; Euripides’ Medea; Horace and Juvenal’s satires; the odes of Pindar, Horace, Catullus, W. H. Auden, Laurence Binyon, Alan Tate, Robert Lowell, Robert Creely, Bernadette Mayer; Sappho’s poetic fragments and the modern Sapphic by Anne Carson, John Frederick Nims, Ezra Pound; elegies of Mimnermus, Propertius, Tyrtaeus, Ovid, Catullus, Jerico Brown, Robert Lowel, A. E. Housman, W. H. Auden, Paul Celan, Rainer Maria Rilke; the Old Testament (the historical books—Genesis, Exodus, etc.—Psalms; the Prophets; Wisdom literature—Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, etc.; selections from the Apocrapha, especially Enoch; the New Testament—the Gospels, Paul’s Letters, Acts, Revelation; Petronius’ Satyricon; selections from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Lucretius, Cicero, Seneca; brief selections from the pre-Socratic philosophers; the Persian Avesta; Nathanael West’s Miss Lonelyhearts; Denis Johnson’s Jesus’ Son; short stories by Flannery O’Connor, Joyce Carol Oates, James Joyce, Raymond Carver, Tim O’Brien, Anton Chekov, William Faulkner, and others; Hesiod’s Works and Days ; Archibald MacLeish’s poetic drama J.B.; Par Lagerkvist’s Barabbas; Anne Sexton’s “The Jesus Papers.”

Grading Policy: Attendance is required. Unexcused absence results in a deduction of three points off the final grade—for each unexcused absence. Class discussion is highly valued. In many ways, this is the heart of the class, for it’s by this means that we share insights into the art of a fine story and insights into the human condition—especially our own. These discussions will be open, frank, and respectful. The discussion grade accounts for 10% of the final grade. This is based not on the number of times you contribute but on the quality of your insights and your willingness to share your thoughts. A careful reading of each story for each class is highly valued. To this end, pop quizzes will constitute 15% of your final grade. You must come to class fully prepared each class meeting. The quizzes will be over the readings due for that day. If you miss a quiz due to an excused absence, you must come by my office within one week from the missed class and take an oral quiz. If you’ve missed class with an excused absence for more than one day, you must, upon your return, arrange a time to make up any missed quizzes. These quizzes will result in a grade of pass or fail. If you score from 70-100, you will receive a pass in the grade book, which cannot be averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. If you score lower than a 70, that grade will be recorded in the grade book and averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. This protects the integrity and goal of the pop quizzes—to determine how prepared you were for class NOT knowing whether you would be given a quiz.

If you miss a quiz due to an unexcused absence, you will not be given a chance to make it up. A zero will be recorded in the grade book.

Requirements and Assignments: You will write five analytical essays (4-8 pages). These will be averaged together and constitute 75% of your final grade. You will be given the opportunity to revise the first essay for a grade by improving the presentation and addressing errors in grammar and punctuation. You will not be allowed to add content to your analysis unless approved by me. Those who need help with your writing will meet with me regularly during the semester. I encourage regular visits for every student in order to discuss both the content of the course and ways to improve your writing. As indicated above, quizzes will make up 15% of your final grade, class discussion 10%.

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 89.999.

A = 90 – above; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Provisional Schedule (subject to change upon notice by the instructor)

To be determined

Instructor’s name:  Michael Adams, Calhoun 316. Office hours MW 4:30-6

E S348 • 20th-Century Short Story

83870 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 105

Instructor:  Adams, M            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  83870            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The focus of this course is beauty and, consequently, the techniques used by short story writers to achieve it. Beauty, as I define it, means that the technique of a story matches what it comprehends. In this sense, one cannot separate the telling of the story from the story itself. Although we will review the various critical approaches to short fiction, the emphasis will always be upon the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the story-teller. We will read a minimum of three short stories per class. At three times during the semester, we will pause over several works by one writer--this semester, it will be Raymond Carver and Flannery O’Connor. The first half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to sharpen our contact with the human condition, even, perhaps, to make us more empathetic individuals. The second half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to make us think about the human condition and the nature of being itself. Though obviously these two emphases are not mutually exclusive, our discussions will vary from reflections on one’s personal experience to intellectual assumptions about one’s meaning in life—be it religious, philosophical, existential, etc.

Texts: Fiction 100, ed. James H. Pickering, 11th edition; Everything that Rises Must Converge, Flannery O’Connor;  

Requirements & Grading: Attendance is required. Unexcused absence results in a deduction of three points off the final grade—for each unexcused absence. Class discussion is highly valued. In many ways, this is the heart of the class, for it’s by this means that we share insights into the art of a fine story and insights into the human condition—especially our own. These discussions will be open, frank, and respectful. The discussion grade accounts for 10% of the final grade. This is based not on the number of times you contribute but on the quality of your insights and your willingness to share your thoughts. A careful reading of each story for each class is highly valued. To this end, pop quizzes will constitute 15% of your final grade. You must come to class fully prepared each class meeting. The quizzes will be over the readings due for that day. If you miss a quiz due to an excused absence, you must come by my office within one week from the missed class and take an oral quiz. If you’ve missed class with an excused absence for more than one day, you must, upon your return, arrange a time to make up any missed quizzes. These quizzes will result in a grade of pass or fail. If you score from 70-100, you will receive a pass in the grade book, which cannot be averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. If you score lower than a 70, that grade will be recorded in the grade book and averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. This protects the integrity and goal of the pop quizzes—to determine how prepared you were for class NOT knowing whether you would be given a quiz.

If you miss a quiz due to an unexcused absence, you will not be given a chance to make it up. A zero will be recorded in the grade book.

You will write three major analytical essays (4-8 pages). These will be averaged together and constitute 70% of your final grade. You will write two short response essays (2-3 pages). This will be averaged together and constitute 10% of your final grade. Regular pop quizzes will be added together and constitute 10% of your final grade. I will give a discussion grade sometime (unannounced) during the semester. This will constitute 10% of your final grade.

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 89.999.

A = 90 – above; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69.

Plagiarism: DON’T take a chance. Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated. I will go over this the first day of class, but every student should go to the following website to get a full account: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php

LAH 350 • In Search Of Meaning

30255 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as HMN 350)

This is a course that asks a lot of questions.  And it questions all of the answers.  If you are uncomfortable being asked questions (about your beliefs, your personal meaning) and reluctant to ask the tough questions of others, this may not be the course for you.    We will begin by establishing (as best history tells us) how what we recognize as western reality came into existence, how the foundation was laid and when. The concepts will include: monotheism; the nature and personality of this god; the soul; chosen people; linear time; history as divine classroom; original sin; heaven; hell; salvation, etc.  After we establish how and when these and a host of other foundational features came into existence and created what we call Judeo-Christian reality, we will contrast the reality created therein with other realities--Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam.    Then we turn back to the West and explore writers and philosophers who reject the institutionally handed down Judeo-Christian reality, and try to put something in its place (Humanism, Deism, Transcendentalism, Existentialism, Nihilism, Eurekans, crystal worshippers, etc.) or find a kind of consolation in atheism or, and often most ignored, a noble kind of Aesthetic Humanism. This journey will lead us to what Pars Lagerkvist called the central question of the modern mind—How do we find meaning in a meaningless world?  We will spend some special time exploring your answers to this question. And, to be fair, at the end of the semester I’ll give you my answer (which is the right answer, of course—hint:  to err is human, to forgive, canine). AND I’ll let you interrogate me, as I will have interrogated you during the semester.

Texts

The Old Testament (selections); Plato, Crito, Phaedo; India's "Vedic Hymns," "The Kena-Upanishad," and "The Mahabharata" or the Bhagavad Gita; Cicero, "The Offices"; Lucretius, "The Nature of Things"; the Gnostic texts (selections), The New Testament (selections), the "Nicaean Creed"; St. Augustine's City of God (selections); the Koran (selections);  Erasmus, "The Praise of Folly"; Pico della Mirandola "Of the Dignity of Man"; Nicolaus Copernicus, "The Revolutions of Heavenly Bodies;" Bruno,  "Of the Infinite Universe and Innumerable Worlds"; Sir Francis Bacon, "Novum Organum"; Martin Luther, "Table Talk";   Thomas Paine, "The Age of Reason"; selections from Locke, d’Holbach, Planck, Bultman,Whitehead, Diderot and others; selected poems of Whitman, Paul Valery, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Anne Sexton, Edna St. Vincent Millay;  Herman  Hesse, Siddhartha; Flannery O’Connor, selected stories; Dostoevsky's "Grand Inquisitor"; Pars Lagervist, Barabbas; Camus, The Stranger; Sartre, No Exit; Nathaniel West, Miss Lonelyhearts; Denis Johnson, Jesus’ Son; Raymond Carver, selected stories; Don Delillo, White Noise.

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

35310 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 204

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: The focus of this course is beauty and, consequently, the techniques used by short story writers to achieve it. Beauty, as I define it, means that the technique of a story matches what it comprehends. In this sense, one cannot separate the telling of the story from the story itself. Although we will review the various critical approaches to short fiction, the emphasis will always be upon the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the story-teller. We will read a minimum of three short stories per class. At three times during the semester, we will pause over several works by one writer--this semester, it will be Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, and Flannery O’Connor. The first half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to sharpen our contact with the human condition, even, perhaps, to make us more empathetic individuals. The second half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to make us think about the human condition and the nature of being itself. Though obviously these two emphases are not mutually exclusive, our discussions will vary from reflections on one’s personal experience to intellectual assumptions about one’s meaning in life—be it religious, philosophical, existential, etc.

Texts: Fiction 100, ed. James H. Pickering, 11th edition; Everything that Rises Must Converge, Flannery O’Connor; Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance is required. Unexcused absence results in a deduction of three points off the final grade—for each unexcused absence. Class discussion is highly valued. In many ways, this is the heart of the class, for it’s by this means that we share insights into the art of a fine story and insights into the human condition—especially our own. These discussions will be open, frank, and respectful. The discussion grade accounts for 10% of the final grade. This is based not on the number of times you contribute but on the quality of your insights and your willingness to share your thoughts. A careful reading of each story for each class is highly valued. To this end, pop quizzes will constitute 15% of your final grade. You must come to class fully prepared each class meeting. The quizzes will be over the readings due for that day. If you miss a quiz due to an excused absence, you must come by my office within one week from the missed class and take an oral quiz. If you’ve missed class with an excused absence for more than one day, you must, upon your return, arrange a time to make up any missed quizzes. These quizzes will result in a grade of pass or fail. If you score from 70-100, you will receive a pass in the grade book, which cannot be averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. If you score lower than a 70, that grade will be recorded in the grade book and averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. This protects the integrity and goal of the pop quizzes—to determine how prepared you were for class NOT knowing whether you would be given a quiz.

If you miss a quiz due to an unexcused absence, you will not be given a chance to make it up. A zero will be recorded in the grade book.

Requirements and Assignments: You will write five analytical essays (5-8 pages). These will be averaged together and constitute 75% of your final grade. The first essay may be dropped for the final averaging. You will be given the opportunity to revise. There will be some peer reading of each other’s work. The peer editing will include the following: For the first essay, each of you will bring five additional copies to class. I will distribute these to your classmates. Your classmates will edit, comment, and evaluate your essay. If, during the semester, I think it would be valuable for you to see the response of other students to your written work, I’ll ask for a clean copy to distribute. We’ll discuss the students’ responses in my office. Each student reads and comments on multiple essays, and also provides specific revision suggestions.

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 89.999.

A = 90 – above; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69.

Plagiarism: DON’T take a chance. Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated. I will go over this the first day of class, but every student should go to the following website to get a full account: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php

LAH 350 • In Search Of Meaning

30295 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.340
(also listed as HMN 350)

This is a course that asks a lot of questions.  And it questions all of the answers.  If you are uncomfortable being asked questions (about your beliefs, your personal meaning) and reluctant to ask the tough questions of others, this may not be the course for you.
    We will begin by establishing (as best history tells us) how what we recognize as western reality came into existence, how the foundation was laid and when. The concepts will include: monotheism; the nature and personality of this god; the soul; chosen people; linear time; history as divine classroom; original sin; heaven; hell; salvation, etc.  After we establish how and when these and a host of other foundational features came into existence and created what we call Judeo-Christian reality, we will contrast the reality created therein with other realities--Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam.
    Then we turn back to the West and explore writers and philosophers who reject the institutionally handed down Judeo-Christian reality, and try to put something in its place (Humanism, Deism, Transcendentalism, Existentialism, Nihilism, Eurekans, crystal worshippers, etc.) or find a kind of consolation in atheism or, and often most ignored, a noble kind of Aesthetic Humanism. This journey will lead us to what Pars Lagerkvist called the central question of the modern mind—How do we find meaning in a meaningless world?  We will spend some special time exploring your answers to this question. And, to be fair, at the end of the semester I’ll give you my answer (which is the right answer, of course—hint:  to err is human, to forgive, canine). AND I’ll let you interrogate me, as I will have interrogated you during the semester.

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story

34665 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 304

Course Description:

The focus of this course is beauty and, consequently, the techniques used by short story writers to achieve it. Beauty, as I define it, means that the technique of a story matches what it comprehends. In this sense, one cannot separate the telling of the story from the story itself. Although we will review the various critical approaches to short fiction, the emphasis will always be upon the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the story-teller. We will read a minimum of three short stories per class. At three times during the semester, we will pause over several works by one writer--this semester, it will be Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, and Flannery O’Connor. The first half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to sharpen our contact with the human condition, even, perhaps, to make us more empathetic individuals. The second half of the course will center on writers whose mission is to make us think about the human condition and the nature of being itself. Though obviously these two emphases are not mutually exclusive, our discussions will vary from reflections on one’s personal experience to intellectual assumptions about one’s meaning in life—be it religious, philosophical, existential, etc.

Texts:

Fiction 100, ed. James H. Pickering, 11th edition; Everything that Rises Must Converge, Flannery O’Connor; Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson.

Grading:

Attendance is required. Unexcused absence results in a deduction of three points off the final grade—for each unexcused absence. Class discussion is highly valued. In many ways, this is the heart of the class, for it’s by this means that we share insights into the art of a fine story and insights into the human condition—especially our own. These discussions will be open, frank, and respectful. The discussion grade accounts for 10% of the final grade. This is based not on the number of times you contribute but on the quality of your insights and your willingness to share your thoughts. A careful reading of each story for each class is highly valued. To this end, pop quizzes will constitute 15% of your final grade. You must come to class fully prepared each class meeting. The quizzes will be over the readings due for that day. If you miss a quiz due to an excused absence, you must come by my office within one week from the missed class and take an oral quiz. If you’ve missed class with an excused absence for more than one day, you must, upon your return, arrange a time to make up any missed quizzes. These quizzes will result in a grade of pass or fail. If you score from 70-100, you will receive a pass in the grade book, which cannot be averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. If you score lower than a 70, that grade will be recorded in the grade book and averaged into your final pop-quiz grade. This protects the integrity and goal of the pop quizzes—to determine how prepared you were for class NOT knowing whether you would be given a quiz. If you miss a quiz due to an unexcused absence, you will not be given a chance to make it up. A zero will be recorded in the grade book.

Requirements and Assignments: You will write five analytical essays (5-8 pages). These will be averaged together and constitute 75% of your final grade. The first essay may be dropped for the final averaging. You will be given the opportunity to revise. There will be some peer reading of each other’s work. The peer editing will include the following: For the first essay, each of you will bring five additional copies to class. I will distribute these to your classmates. Your classmates will edit, comment, and evaluate your essay. If, during the semester, I think it would be valuable for you to see the response of other students to your written work, I’ll ask for a clean copy to distribute. We’ll discuss the students’ responses in my office. Each student reads and comments on multiple essays, and also provides specific revision suggestions.

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric. Please note: to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 89.999.

A = 90 – above; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69.

Plagiarism: DON’T take a chance. Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated. I will go over this the first day of class, but every student should go to the following website to get a full account: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis_plagiarism.php

Prerequisites:

Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E 348 • 20th-Century Short Story-W

35120 • Fall 2009
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 105

TBD

HMN 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

36765 • Fall 2002

Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.

E 385N • Creatv Writing: Wrkshp In Fict

31593 • Fall 2000
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM PAR 302

 

Awards & Honors


  • Academy of Distinguished Teachers
  • President Associate's Excellence in Teaching Award
  • Liberal Arts Council Teaching Award
  • Dad's Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship
  • Eyes of Texas Award
  • Elected to Texas Institute of Letters

Curriculum Vitae


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