The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas

David Kornhaber


Associate ProfessorPh.D., 2009, Columbia University

Courses


C L 180K • Intro To Comparative Lit

33585 • Fall 2016
Meets F 2:00PM-3:00PM CAL 22

One-credit-hour proseminar in methods of study and research in comparative literature.

Required of first-semester graduate students in comparative literature.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in comparative literature and consent of the graduate adviser in comparative literature.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

E 379L • Contemporary Drama

35570 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 308

E 379L  l  Contemporary Drama

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David

Unique #:  35570

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This course presents an introduction to the major playwrights and themes of contemporary drama in the English-speaking world, focusing primarily on the United States and England.  Beginning with a consideration of the origins of contemporary drama in the theatrical revolutions of the late 1950s to early 1970s, the course moves on to an examination of some of the major plays and playwrights of the last twenty-five years organized around three recurrent areas of concern: re-adaptations and revisions of classical themes and techniques; reflections on and reconsiderations of issues of modern identity, both personal and national; and epic re-stagings of history to current political ends.  Works will be considered as examples of dramatic literature in dialogue with their dramatic predecessors and contemporaries and as documents of contemporary theatrical culture, influenced and often determined by the institutional structures of New York’s Broadway and Off-Broadway or London’s West End and Fringe production arrangements.

Texts:  Osborne, Look Back in Anger; Pinter, The Birthday Party; Kennedy, Funnyhouse of a Negro; Baraka, The Duthchman; Mamet, American Buffalo; Shepard, Buried Child; Kane, Phaedra in Love; Mee, Big Love; Walcott, Odyssey: A Stage Version; Bond, Lear; Vogel, How I Learned to Drive; Ruhl, Passion Play; Parks, The America Play; Letts, August: Osage County; Hwang, M. Butterfly; Greenberg, Take Me Out; Fornes, Fefu and Her Friends; Cruz, Anna in the Tropics; Kushner, Angels in America; Hare, The Absence of War; Churchill, The Skriker; Stoppard, The Coast of Utopia.

Requirements & Grading:  Attendance and participation, including in-class essay workshops 15%; two short essays (5 pages each) with opportunity for revision, 25%+25%; one 8-10-page essay, 35%.

E 379P • Drama In Performance

35575 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.208

E 379P  l  Drama in Performance

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David

Unique #:  35575

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This course offers an introduction to the study of twentieth-century drama through performance.  Ranging from the avant-garde experiments of the early twentieth century to some of the pivotal works of the last thirty years, the course will provide a broad overview of major trends in English, American, and European drama after 1900.  Students should expect a highly participatory and hands-on approach to studying these classic playtexts: extensive class time will be devoted to staging, performing, and experimenting with scenes from the selected plays.  No acting experience (or ability) is required, however.  The goal of these in-class performances will be to better understand the dramatic texts themselves by putting them “on their feet,” and students will be expected to look for and analyze trends within and across the plays being studied from an academic perspective.  Key questions to be considered over the course of the class include the changing conceptions of character and narrative in modern drama, the influence of the avant-garde, the politics of modern drama, and the perpetual tension between text and performance.

Texts (tentative):  Antonin Artaud, The Spurt of Blood; Samuel Beckett, Endgame; Harold Pinter, The Homecoming; Adrienne Kennedy, A Move Star Has to Star in Black and White; Maria Irene Fornes, Mud; Sam Shepard, True West.

Requirements & Grading:  1) Participation, 25%; 2) Three short reflective essays, 25% each.

E F316L • British Literature

81860 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 304

E f316L  l  British Literature

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David

Unique #:  81860

Semester:  Summer 2016, first session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A

Description:  This course offers an introduction to the major works of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the end of the twentieth century.  Key topics to be considered include:  the changing concept of Englishness and the construction of British identity; formal relationships and divergences across the genres of poetry, fiction, and drama; and the intersections of literature and literary production with history and politics.  Through this course of study, students can expect to achieve a grounding in some of the major authors and texts of the British literary tradition and an introduction to the core techniques of close reading and literary analysis.

Texts (tentative):  Beowulf (selections); The Canterbury Tales (Chaucer; selections); Everyman; Hamlet (Shakespeare); Paradise Lost (Milton; selections); Frankenstein (Shelly); selected poems of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Bryon, and Shelly; The Importance of Being Earnest (Wilde); The Waste Land (Elliott); Arcadia (Stoppard)

Requirements & Grading:  1) Participation, 20%; 2) In-class quizzes, 10%; 3) Take-home midterm, 35%; 4) Take-home final, 35%.

E S321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

82095 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 304

E s321  l  Shakespeare: Selected Plays

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David

Unique #:  82095

Semester:  Summer 2016, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  This course offers an introduction to some of Shakespeare’s major plays with a particular focus on their place within the theatrical culture of early modern England and within theatre history more generally.  Students can expect to receive a grounding in the history of staging and production practices in Elizabethan and Jacobean England and to consider Shakespeare’s work in light of their engagement with contemporary theatrical traditions.  Students will also consider how some of Shakespeare’s key works have been adapted to changing theatrical mores by leading actors and directors of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.  Key questions to be considered include how Shakespeare’s works engage with issues of dramatic genre, how they deploy and play with aspects of theatrical craft and technique, and how they engage with the issues of theatricality and metatheatricality alongside other concerns.  Students will also begin to consider in what ways Shakespeare’s works sustain adaptation to changing theatrical traditions and in what ways new production approaches can recast the plays themselves.

Texts (tentative):  Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard III, Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Twelfth Night, The Tempest.

Requirements and Grading:  1) Regular reading quizzes, 20%; 2) Midterm essay exam, 30%; 3) End-of-term essay exam, 30%; 4) Class participation, 10%; 5) Production review, 10%.

C L 381 • Mod Drama: Ibsen To O'Neill

32935 • Spring 2016
Meets F 9:00AM-12:00PM CAL 323
(also listed as E 397M)

This course presents a survey of European and American modern drama from its initial development in the late nineteenth century through the middle of the twentieth century.  Major playwrights to be considered include Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Wilde, Shaw, Pirandello, Artaud, Brecht, Beckett, Glaspell, and O’Neill.  (European playwrights will be read in English translation, although students will be encouraged to consider writers in their original languages wherever possible.)  Key topics include theories of the origins and development of modern drama, formal features of modern drama, modern drama and the avant-garde, and the transition from modern drama to postmodern drama.  Students will be exposed to significant works of contemporary scholarship in the field as well as to classic modern drama interpretations.  The class will also make use of the extensive modern drama holdings at the Harry Ransom Center.  Evaluation will consist of a combination of a class participation, a conference-length paper, a book review, and an article-length paper.

E 369 • Twentieth-Century Drama

34620 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 204

E 369  l  Twentieth-Century Drama

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David

Unique #:  34620

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course presents a survey of the major playwrights and theatrical movements in British drama over the course of the twentieth century. The organizing framework of the course is the tension between the theatre of social engagement and the theatre of aesthetic detachment as advocated and articulated by playwrights from the 1890s to century’s end. In addition to considering each work as part of a common body of British dramatic literature, attention will be paid throughout the course to the changing currents and institutions of British stagecraft and theatrical production—from the influence of stage designers like Edward Gordon Craig and directors like Harley Granville Barker to the role of the leading playhouses of twentieth-century England, including the National Theatre, Royal Shakespeare Company, and Royal Court Theatre. Extensive consideration will also be given to British drama’s relationship to the major historical and cultural trends of the British twentieth century, from the Easter uprising, to the impact of the World Wars, to decolonization and the decline of the British Empire, to mid-century post-war malaise, to the rise of Thatcherism, to the post-Thatcher era of New Labour and “Cool Britannia.” Ongoing attention will also be paid to British drama’s relationship to, dialogue with, and influence from the drama of its colonies and former colonies, in particular Irish drama and the drama of the African Commonwealth nations.

Possible Texts: Shaw, Major Barbara;Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Yeats, At the Hawk’s Well; Synge, The Playboy of the Western World; Barrie, Peter Pan; Lawrence, The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd; Coward, The Vortex; Priestly, An Inspector Calls; Rattigan, The Winslow Boy; Beckett, Waiting for Godot and Endgame; Osborne, Look Back in Anger; Pinter, The Birthday Party; Bond, Saved; Orton, Loot; Ayckbourn, The Norman Conquests; Frayn, Noises Off; Soyinka, Death and the King’s Horseman; Fugard, Master Harold… and the Boys; Churchill, Top Girls; Kane, Blasted; MacPherson, The Weir; McDonagh, The Cripple of Inishmaan; Hare, The Absence of War;Stoppard, Arcadia.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation, including in-class essay workshops 15%; two short essays (5 pages each) with opportunity for revision, 25%+25%; one 8-10 page essay, 35%.

T C 302 • Theories Of The Theatre

41980 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 210

Description: Theatre is one of the oldest artistries in the Western tradition, yet through the centuries there has been little agreement as to its nature and purpose as an artistic form or social practice. In this course, we will take a broad look at the ways in which philosophers, playwrights, directors and many others have tried to formulate theories of what it means, for the individual and for society, to write, produce, or attend a play—as well as plays that writers have crafted to reflect the viewpoints of each theory. Attention will be paid to each work in its particular cultural context and readings will be supplemented with select historical material to help students position works in their own unique time and place. But the primary goal of the course will be to look at these theories and plays across historical and cultural boundaries: to investigate the ways in which they build from, respond to, or challenge one another and to identify how and why certain ideas and plays retain intellectual traction and emotional impact long after their particular cultural milieu has disappeared. More than that, the aim of the course will be to engage directly with the selfsame questions posed in the texts being studied: What is the theatre? How is it best structured? How does it function in society? Why should it exist at all? Students should expect to leave the class with an understanding of how others have approached these queries through the ages but also with a clearer articulation of their own beliefs and viewpoints, enhanced through the study of past thinkers and artists.

 

Texts/Readings:

Theatre/Theory/Theatre: The Major Critical Texts from Aristotle and Zeami to Soyinka and Havel, ed. Daniel Gerould (New York, NY: Applause, 2000)

o Aristotle, Poetics (excerpts)                                 o Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy (excerpts)

o Sidney, “The Defense of Poesy”                           o Brecht, “The Modern Theatre is the Epic Theatre”

o Corneille, “Of the Three Unities”                           o Artaud, The Theatre and Its Double (excerpts)

o Schiller, “The Stage as a Moral Institution”

 

The Norton Anthology of Drama: Shorter Edition, ed. J. Ellen Gainor, Stanton Garner, Jr., and Martin Puchner (New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Co., 2009)

o Sophocles, Oedipus the King                                                                            o Strindberg, Miss Julie

o Shakespeare, Hamlet                                                                                      o Brecht, The Good Woman of Setzuan

o Moliere, Tartuffe                                                                                             o Beckett, Waiting for Godot

 

Assignments:

Discussion - Participation in classroom discussion: 15%

Presentations - Oral Presentations: 10%

Writing - University Lecture Response Paper (2 pages): 15%, Short Essay – with one revision (6-8 ?                 pages): 25%,

Research Essay – with one revision (10-12 pages): 35%

 

About the Professor: David Kornhaber is Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D., with Distinction, from Columbia University and his A.B., summa cum laude, from Harvard College. His research interests center on Modern and Contemporary Drama and particularly the intersections of theatre and philosophy. He has published journal articles and book chapters on Bertolt Brecht, Antonin Artaud, and contemporary theatre in New York, and he is currently at work on a manuscript entitled The Birth of Theatre from the Spirit of Philosophy: Friedrich Nietzsche and the Development of the Modern Drama. He also served as Assistant Editor of the academic journal Theatre Survey from 2007-2008. He is an avid theatre-goer and has worked previously as a theatre critic and arts journalist. He has served as an Affiliated Writer with American Theatre, as a theatre critic for The Village Voice, and as a contributor to the Theatre section of The New York Times.

E 395M • 20th-Century American Drama

35145 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM MEZ 2.102

This course presents a study of modern American drama from the start of the twentieth century to the present day, with a particular focus on exploring major strains of contemporary scholarship.  Key topics include drama’s changing place in twentieth-century American society, the relationship between drama and politics in America, and drama’s role in negotiating and representing questions of identity (gender, sexuality, race) within an American context. Representative playwrights include Eugene O’Neil, Clifford Odets, Thornton Wilder, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Edward Albee, Adrienne Kennedy, Sam Shepard, David Mamet, Maria Irene Fornes, David Henry Hwang, August Wilson, Tony Kushner, and Paula Vogel.  Contemporary scholars of American drama whose work we will consider include Marc Robinson, David Savran, Julia Walker, and Susan Harris Smith, among others.  The course will make use of relevant holdings in the Harry Ransom Center, and students will be assessed through a combination of discussion participation, a review article, a short paper, and a final paper.

T C 302 • Theories Of The Theatre

42365 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CAL 221

Description: Theatre is one of the oldest artistries in the Western tradition, yet through the centuries there has been little agreement as to its nature and purpose as an artistic form or social practice. In this course, we will take a broad look at the ways in which philosophers, playwrights, directors and many others have tried to formulate theories of what it means, for the individual and for society, to write, produce, or attend a play—as well as plays that writers have crafted to reflect the viewpoints of each theory. Attention will be paid to each work in its particular cultural context and readings will be supplemented with select historical material to help students position works in their own unique time and place. But the primary goal of the course will be to look at these theories and plays across historical and cultural boundaries: to investigate the ways in which they build from, respond to, or challenge one another and to identify how and why certain ideas and plays retain intellectual traction and emotional impact long after their particular cultural milieu has disappeared. More than that, the aim of the course will be to engage directly with the selfsame questions posed in the texts being studied: What is the theatre? How is it best structured? How does it function in society? Why should it exist at all? Students should expect to leave the class with an understanding of how others have approached these queries through the ages but also with a clearer articulation of their own beliefs and viewpoints, enhanced through the study of past thinkers and artists.

 

Texts/Readings:

Theatre/Theory/Theatre: The Major Critical Texts from Aristotle and Zeami to Soyinka and Havel, ed. Daniel Gerould (New York, NY: Applause, 2000)

Aristotle, Poetics (excerpts)                                

Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy (excerpts)

Sidney, “The Defense of Poesy”

Brecht, “The Modern Theatre is the Epic Theatre”

Corneille, “Of the Three Unities”

Artaud, The Theatre and Its Double (excerpts)

Schiller, “The Stage as a Moral Institution” The Norton Anthology of Drama: Shorter Edition, ed. J. Ellen Gainor, Stanton Garner, Jr., and Martin Puchner (New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Co., 2009)

Sophocles, Oedipus the King                                                                    

Strindberg, Miss Julieo Shakespeare, Hamlet                                                                                  

Brecht, The Good Woman of Setzuano Moliere, Tartuffe                                                                                            

Beckett, Waiting for Godot 

 

Assignments:

Discussion - Participation in classroom discussion: 15%

Presentations - Oral Presentations: 10%

Writing - University Lecture Response Paper (2 pages): 15%, Short Essay – with one revision (6-8                  pages): 25%, Research Essay – with one revision (10-12 pages): 35% 

 

About the Professor: David Kornhaber is Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D., with Distinction, from Columbia University and his A.B., summa cum laude, from Harvard College. His research interests center on Modern and Contemporary Drama and particularly the intersections of theatre and philosophy. He has published journal articles and book chapters on Bertolt Brecht, Antonin Artaud, and contemporary theatre in New York, and he is currently at work on a manuscript entitled The Birth of Theatre from the Spirit of Philosophy: Friedrich Nietzsche and the Development of the Modern Drama. He also served as Assistant Editor of the academic journal Theatre Survey from 2007-2008. He is an avid theatre-goer and has worked previously as a theatre critic and arts journalist. He has served as an Affiliated Writer with American Theatre, as a theatre critic for The Village Voice, and as a contributor to the Theatre section of The New York Times.

E 379P • Drama In Performance-Honors

35980 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CAL 419

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David

Unique #:  35980

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LAH 350

Flags:  No

Restrictions:  English Honors

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course offers an introduction to the study of twentieth-century drama through performance. Ranging from the avant-garde experiments of the early twentieth century to some of the pivotal works of the last thirty years, the course will provide a broad overview of major trends in English, American, and European drama after 1900. Students should expect a highly participatory and hands-on approach to studying these classic playtexts: extensive class time will be devoted to staging, performing, and experimenting with scenes from the selected plays. No acting experience (or ability) is required, however. The goal of these in-class performances will be to better understand the dramatic texts themselves by putting them “on their feet,” and students will be expected to look for and analyze trends within and across the plays being studied from an academic perspective. Key questions to be considered over the course of the class include the changing conceptions of character and narrative in modern drama, the influence of the avant-garde, the politics of modern drama, and the perpetual tension between text and performance.

Texts (tentative): Antonin Artaud, The Spurt of Blood; Bertolt Brecht, A Man’s A Man; Samuel Beckett, Endgame; Eugene Ionesco, The Bald Soprano; Harold Pinter, The Homecoming; Adrienne Kennedy, A Move Star Has to Star in Black and White; Maria Irene Fornes, Mud; Sam Shepard, True West.

Requirements & Grading: 1) Participation, 35%; 2) Short reflective essays, 20% + 20%; 3) Final essay, 25%.

T C 357 • Shakespeare In Performance

43460 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 210

Instructor: David D. Kornhaber, Assistant Professor, Department of English, College of Liberal Arts

 

Description: This course, a discussion and participation class emphasizes Shakespeare as a man of the theater, a player as well as a creator of many roles, a member of an acting troupe. To read his plays merely as literary texts, rather than as scripts, is to miss something crucial about them. Students are not expected to be theater majors, but should be interested in aspects of performance -- staging, speaking, enacting characters, directing, and so on -- that help us to understand both the texts of Shakespearean drama and their historical and theatrical context.

We will study eight plays, reading and viewing them in multiple versions in order to see how productions work as translations/interpretations.  We will also work with videos of the series Playing Shakespeare by John Barton, former Royal Shakespeare Company director, and with Actors from the London Stage (AFTLS), a troupe of five classically trained British actors from England who will be in residency at UT for a week in November, teaching classes (including ours) and performing a play.  Classes will be primarily detailed discussion of the day's assignment and the productions, both live and on video, and acting out scenes from the plays.  Class attendance and active participation are required.  Students will attend screenings of plays (and live theater when possible), participate in two groups that are responsible for presenting plays to the class, and engage fully in the AFTLS residency.

 

Texts/Readings (tentative):

David Bevington, ed., The Essential Shakespeare

John Barton, Playing Shakespeare

 

Assignments:

Play Journals - 20%

Two short papers, 15% each - 30%

Term Paper - 30%

Class participation - 20%

 

E S321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

83385 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM CLA 0.104

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David

Unique #:  83385

Semester:  Summer 2014, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Global cultures

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course offers an introduction to some of Shakespeare’s major plays with a particular focus on their place within the theatrical culture of early modern England and within theatre history more generally. Students can expect to receive a grounding in the history of staging and production practices in Elizabethan and Jacobean England and to consider Shakespeare’s work in light of their engagement with contemporary theatrical traditions. Students will also consider how some of Shakespeare’s key works have been adapted to changing theatrical mores by leading actors and directors of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Key questions to be considered include how Shakespeare’s works engage with issues of dramatic genre, how they deploy and play with aspects of theatrical craft and technique, and how they engage with the issues of theatricality and metatheatricality alongside other concerns. Students will also begin to consider in what ways Shakespeare’s works sustain adaptation to changing theatrical traditions and in what ways new production approaches can recast the plays themselves.

Texts: (tentative) Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard III, Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Twelfth Night, The Tempest.

Requirements and Grading: 1) Regular reading quizzes, 20%; 2) Midterm essay exam, 30%; 3) End-of-term essay exam, 30%; 4) Class participation, 10%; 5) Production review, 10%.

C L 381 • Avant-Garde Theatre

33905 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM MEZ 1.104
(also listed as E 390M)

Avant-Garde Theatre

In this course, we will investigate the histories, philosophies, and theatre pieces of the theatrical avant-garde from the nineteenth century to the present day.  Key questions include the relationship between the avant-garde and the modern, the interplay between the avant-garde and concepts of high and low culture, and the degree of continuity and discord between movements and works that group themselves under the avant-garde banner.  We will begin with the avant-garde theatre's nineteenth century origins, from Richard Wagner to Alfred Jarry, and will continue through the avant-garde movements of the early twentieth century (Symbolism, Surrealism, Dadaism), the work of early-to-mid century theatre artists who draw from the avant-garde (Antonin Artaud, Bertolt Brecht, Samuel Beckett), the rise of performance happenings in the 1960s, and the pillars of the contemporary avant-garde (Robert Wilson, The Wooster Group, Ariane Mnouchkine). The course will make use of relevant holdings in the Harry Ransom Center, and students will be assessed through a combination of discussion participation, a formal presentation, a short paper, and a final paper.

E 369 • Twentieth-Century Drama

35635 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 308

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35635            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course presents a survey of the major playwrights and theatrical movements in British drama over the course of the twentieth century. The organizing framework of the course is the tension between the theatre of social engagement and the theatre of aesthetic detachment as advocated and articulated by playwrights from the 1890s to century’s end. In addition to considering each work as part of a common body of British dramatic literature, attention will be paid throughout the course to the changing currents and institutions of British stagecraft and theatrical production—from the influence of stage designers like Edward Gordon Craig and directors like Harley Granville Barker to the role of the leading playhouses of twentieth-century England, including the National Theatre, Royal Shakespeare Company, and Royal Court Theatre. Extensive consideration will also be given to British drama’s relationship to the major historical and cultural trends of the British twentieth century, from the Easter uprising, to the impact of the World Wars, to decolonization and the decline of the British Empire, to mid-century post-war malaise, to the rise of Thatcherism, to the post-Thatcher era of New Labour and “Cool Britannia.” Ongoing attention will also be paid to British drama’s relationship to, dialogue with, and influence from the drama of its colonies and former colonies, in particular Irish drama and the drama of the African Commonwealth nations.

Possible Texts: Shaw, Major Barbara; Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Yeats, At the Hawk’s Well; Synge, The Playboy of the Western World; Barrie, Peter Pan; Lawrence, The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd; Coward, The Vortex; Priestly, An Inspector Calls; Rattigan, The Winslow Boy; Beckett, Waiting for Godot and Endgame; Osborne, Look Back in Anger; Pinter, The Birthday Party; Bond, Saved; Orton, Loot; Ayckbourn, The Norman Conquests; Frayn, Noises Off; Soyinka, Death and the King’s Horseman; Fugard, Master Harold… and the Boys; Churchill, Top Girls; Kane, Blasted; MacPherson, The Weir; McDonagh, The Cripple of Inishmaan; Hare, The Absence of War; Stoppard, Arcadia.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation, including in-class essay workshops 15%; two short essays (5 pages each) with opportunity for revision, 25%+25%; one 8-10 page essay, 35%.

E 343L • Modernism And Literature

35425 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 303

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David            Areas:  V / F

Unique #:  35425            Flags:  Global cultures; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In his 1905 preface to Major Barbara, George Bernard Shaw speaks of an intellectual “world movement,” with proponents from Darwin to Nietzsche, that had altered the scientific and philosophical thought of the nineteenth century and was in the process of transforming the literature of the twentieth. In this course, we will examine some of the central thinkers and texts of the 1800s and early 1900s that helped to lay the intellectual groundwork for the transformations of Modern Literature. Ranging across science, philosophy, psychology, and politics, we will look at how a series of revolutionary ideas transformed contemporary notions of morality, consciousness, and even time and space themselves and how these intellectual developments ultimately shaped and were reflected in the new literary structures and thematics of the twentieth century. Major thinkers to be addressed in this class include Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche, and Freud, with background readings on their precursors, peers, and inheritors. For our literary readings we will consider work across genres, with a special emphasis on dramatic literature as a tradition particularly engaged with philosophy and social thought. A background in philosophy or science is not required, and the course assumes no prior study in this area.

Texts: Thinkers: Marx, The Communist Manifesto, Das Kapital; Darwin, On the Origin of Species, The Descent of Man; Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra, The Genealogy of Morals; Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams, Civilization and Its Discontents; Course Reader with additional selections.

Authors: Strindberg, The Father; Shaw, Major Barbara; O’Neill, Strange Interlude; Brecht, A Man’s a Man; Course Reader with selections from Eliot, Pound, Woolf, Joyce, and Stein.

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation: 15%; two short essays (5 pages each): 25%+25%; one eight-page essay: 35%.

E 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

35690 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 221

Instructor: Kornhaber, David            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35690            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  English Honors

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Enrollment in or completion of at least one Honors section of an English course, admission to the English Honors Program, and consent of the honors adviser. Enrollment restricted by department.

Description: According to the Honors Thesis Manual, a thesis is “a sustained examination of a central idea or question, developed in a professional and mature manner under the guidance of a faculty supervisor and a second reader.” That sounds easy enough, but how does one get there from here? This course offers something of a roadmap. Over the course of the term we will examine literary criticism from the “inside out” and hone skills essential to a successful honors thesis.

Along the way, we will address a number of questions, both practical—How do I use the MLA Bibliography? What’s the difference between a footnote and an endnote?—and theoretical—What counts as a valid argument about a literary work? What is the relation between literature and theory? Theory and practice? This course will: first and foremost prepare students to write an honors thesis. Members of this course will explore various methods of literary and cultural interpretation, consider what it means to conduct literary research, and learn how to take their research and writing to new levels of expertise.

Texts: Required Core Texts:  Tom Stoppard, Arcadia (Faber and Faber, 1994).  0571169341A. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, ed. and trans. Burton Raffel (Signet, 2009).  0451531191. Required Secondary Texts: Wayne Booth, et al, The Craft of Research (Third Edition) (University Of Chicago Press, 2008). #978-0226065663; Marjorie Garber, A Manifesto for Literary Studies (University of Washington Press, 2003). #978-0295983448; Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing (Norton, 2005). # 978-0393924091.

Optional Supplementary Text: Eviatar Zerubavel, The Clockwork Muse: A Practical Guide to Writing Theses, Dissertations, & Books (Harvard, 1999) #0-674-13586-5; Richard Bullock and Francine Weinberg, The Little Seagull (Norton, 2011). 039311519.

Requirements & Grading: (assignment logistics, rationales, and approaches will be discussed at length during class)

Final Thesis Prospectus (4-6 pp.) & Annotated Bibliography (20-25+ items)            30%

Writing Sample (15-20 pp. section or sections of your actual thesis)            30%

In-Class Performance (quality & consistency of discussion; preparation; engagement;

informal writing; writing-process & bibliography tasks; peer feedback; Symposium)            30%

On-time Completion of Reading, Writing-Process, Research, & Peer Feedback Assignments            10%

On-time Attendance (note: every absence beginning with #4 will reduce grade; NC at #9)            Required

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade of the course. The university does not recognize the grade of A+. Evaluation percentages approximate & subject to minor change.

E S321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

83845 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 2:30PM-4:00PM PAR 105

Instructor:  Kornhaber, David            Areas:  I / D

Unique #:  83845            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course offers an introduction to some of Shakespeare’s major plays with a particular focus on their place within the theatrical culture of early modern England and within theatre history more generally. Students can expect to receive a grounding in the history of staging and production practices in Elizabethan and Jacobean England and to consider Shakespeare’s work in light of their engagement with contemporary theatrical traditions. Students will also consider how some of Shakespeare’s key works have been adapted to changing theatrical mores by leading actors and directors of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Key questions to be considered include how Shakespeare’s works engage with issues of dramatic genre, how they deploy and play with aspects of theatrical craft and technique, and how they engage with the issues of theatricality and metatheatricality alongside other concerns. Students will also begin to consider in what ways Shakespeare’s works sustain adaptation to changing theatrical traditions and in what ways new production approaches can recast the plays themselves.

Texts: (tentative) Titus Andronicus, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Richard III, Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Twelfth Night, The Tempest.

Requirements and Grading: 1) Regular reading quizzes, 20%; 2) Midterm essay exam, 30%; 3) End-of-term essay exam, 30%; 4) Class participation, 10%; 5) Production review, 10%.

E F379L • Contemporary Drama

83665 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 303

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course presents an introduction to the major playwrights and themes of contemporary drama in England and America. Beginning with a consideration of the origins of contemporary drama in the theatrical revolutions of the late 1950s to early 1970s, the course moves on to an examination of some of the major plays and playwrights of the last twenty-five years organized around three recurrent areas of concern: re-adaptations and revisions of classical themes and techniques; reflections on and reconsiderations of issues of modern identity, both personal and national; and explorations of contemporary political and social issues. Works will be considered as examples of dramatic literature in dialogue with their dramatic predecessors and contemporaries and as documents of contemporary theatrical culture, influenced and often determined by the institutional structures of New York’s Broadway and Off-Broadway or London’s West End and Fringe production arrangements. 

 

Texts: Osborne, Look Back in Anger; Pinter, The Homecoming; Kennedy, Funnyhouse of a Negro and The Owl Answers; Baraka, Dutchman; Mamet, Glengarry, Glen Ross; Shepard, Buried Child; Kane, Phaedra in Love; Mee, Big Love; Vogel, How I Learned to Drive; Bond, Lear; Ruhl, Passion Play; Wilson, Fences; Parks, The America Play; Guare, Six Degrees of Separation; Letts, August: Osage County; Hwang, M. Butterfly; Durang, The Marriage of Bette and Boo; Fornes, Mud; Albee, The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?; Kushner, Angels in America; Hare, Stuff Happens; Churchill, A Number; Frayne, Copenhagen; Stoppard, The Coast of Utopia; Wilson, Einstein on the Beach.

 

Requirements & Grading: Attendance and participation, including in-class essay workshops 15%; two short essays (3-5 pages each) with opportunity for revision, 25%+25%; one 6-8-page essay, 35%.

E 369 • Twentieth-Century Drama

35735 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 208

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement. 

 

Description: This course presents a survey of the major playwrights and theatrical movements in British drama over the course of the twentieth century.  The organizing framework of the course is the tension between the theatre of social engagement and the theatre of aesthetic detachment as advocated and articulated by playwrights from the 1890s to century’s end.  In addition to considering each work as part of a common body of British dramatic literature, attention will be paid throughout the course to the changing currents and institutions of British stagecraft and theatrical production—from the influence of stage designers like Edward Gordon Craig and directors like Harley Granville Barker to the role of the leading playhouses of twentieth-century England, including the National Theatre, Royal Shakespeare Company, and Royal Court Theatre.  Extensive consideration will also be given to British drama’s relationship to the major historical and cultural trends of the British twentieth century, from the Easter uprising, to the impact of the World Wars, to decolonization and the decline of the British Empire, to mid-century post-war malaise, to the rise of Thatcherism, to the post-Thatcher era of New Labour and “Cool Britannia.”  Ongoing attention will also be paid to British drama’s relationship to, dialogue with, and influence from the drama of its colonies and former colonies, in particular Irish drama and the drama of the African Commonwealth nations.

Texts: Shaw, Major Barbara; Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Yeats, At the Hawk’s Well; Synge, The Playboy of the Western World; Barrie, Peter Pan; Lawrence, The Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd; Coward, The Vortex; Priestly, An Inspector Calls; Rattigan, The Winslow Boy; Beckett, Waiting for Godot and Endgame; Osborne, Look Back in Anger; Pinter, The Birthday Party; Bond, Saved; Orton, Loot; Ayckbourn, The Norman Conquests; Frayn, Noises Off; Soyinka, Death and the King’s Horseman; Fugard, Master Harold… and the Boys; Churchill, Top Girls; Kane, Blasted; MacPherson, The Weir; McDonagh, The Cripple of Inishmaan; Hare, The Absence of War; Stoppard, Arcadia;

Grading Policy: Attendance and participation, including in-class essay workshops 15%; two short essays (5 pages each) with opportunity for revision, 25%+25%; one 8-10 page essay, 35%

Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

English Major Area:  III

E 379L • Contemporary Drama

35815 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 308

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: This course presents an introduction to the major playwrights and themes of contemporary drama in the English-speaking world, focusing primarily on the United States and England. Beginning with a consideration of the origins of contemporary drama in the theatrical revolutions of the late 1950s to early 1970s, the course moves on to an examination of some of the major plays and playwrights of the last twenty-five years organized around three recurrent areas of concern: re-adaptations and revisions of classical themes and techniques; reflections on and reconsiderations of issues of modern identity, both personal and national; and epic re-stagings of history to current political ends. Works will be considered as examples of dramatic literature in dialogue with their dramatic predecessors and contemporaries and as documents of contemporary theatrical culture, influenced and often determined by the institutional structures of New York’s Broadway and Off-Broadway or London’s West End and Fringe production arrangements.

Texts: Osborne, Look Back in Anger; Pinter, The Birthday Party; Kennedy, Funnyhouse of a Negro; Baraka, The Duthchman; Mamet, American Buffalo; Shepard, Buried Child; Kane, Phaedra in Love; Mee, Big Love; Walcott, Odyssey: A Stage Version; Bond, Lear; Vogel, How I Learned to Drive; Ruhl, Passion Play; Parks, The America Play; Letts, August: Osage County; Hwang, M. Butterfly; Greenberg, Take Me Out; Fornes, Fefu and Her Friends; Cruz, Anna in the Tropics; Kushner, Angels in America; Hare, The Absence of War; Churchill, The Skriker; Stoppard, The Coast of Utopia

Grading: Attendance and participation, including in-class essay workshops 15%; two short essays (5 pages each) with opportunity for revision, 25%+25%; one 8-10 page essay, 35%

C L 382 • Intersectns Of Theatre/Philos

32963 • Fall 2010
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM BEN 1.106
(also listed as E 397M)

It has become a commonplace in many critical studies to speak of a growing convergence between philosophy and theatre.  Over the course of the last century and a half, philosophy has become increasingly invested in interrogating issues of the stage, with contemporary thinkers like Alain Badiou, Jacques Derrida, Peter Sloterdijk, and Gilles Deleuze turning to the playhouse for questions or importing into their own work a consciously “theatrical” style.  Likewise, drama has become increasingly interested in exploring issues taken up by contemporary philosophers and deploying philosophical language to its own devices, from George Bernard Shaw’s Nietzschean postulations to Tony Kushner’s indebtedness to Walter Benjamin to Tom Stoppard’s ongoing engagement with philosophers past and present.  In this course, we will examine several key points of intersection between the institutions of philosophy and the theatre to better understand what each intellectual approach takes from the other, where they talk past one another, and where we might locate true synergies of thought or expression.  Rather than attempting a broad sample of all the theatrical-philosophical interactions of the last century, the course will be organized thematically, with four distinct segments devoted to a specific way of looking at the interplay of philosophers and theater-makers.

For the first half of the course, we will look specifically at philosophers or playwrights writing on or in the other’s discipline, with themed segments on “Philosophers Writing on the Theatre” and “Playwrights Writing on Philosophy.”  Key questions to interrogate here include how practitioners of one subject view the practices of the other, what philosophy thinks it has to say to the theatre, and what the theatre thinks it can tell philosophy.  The second half of the course will look at how philosophers and theatre-makers import each others’ techniques or subjects into their own works, with themed segments on “Theatrically-Informed Philosophy” and “Philosophically-Informed Theatre.”  Here we will investigate how an interest in each others’ discipline transforms the stylistics, the intellectual assumptions, and the core matters of concern in works of philosophy or the theatre, examining what is gained in the exchange and what, if anything, is lost.

The course will assume no prior training in philosophy.  Though the subjects of our inquiry will be targeted, taken together they will offer students a broad introduction to some of the major trends and themes in twentieth-century philosophy and literary theory and a chance to engage with some of the century’s most pivotal playwrights.  In total, students will gain an appreciation for the manifold ways in which this ongoing exchange between two very different means of inquiry and communication has manifested itself over the last century and a half and how each subject has been changed by the encounter.

Requirements

Course requirements include participation in class discussions, an oral presentation, and a final paper.  Participation in class discussions will consist of active engagement in classroom exchanges and will count for 15% of the final grade.  Each student will be required to prepare a 10-minute oral presentation for the class on a course reading of their choosing, which will count for 15% of the final grade.  Each student will also be required to complete an 18-20 page final paper on a topic of their choosing, which will count for 70% of the final grade.

Readings

Course readings are organized thematically into four units.  For “Philosophers Writing on the Theatre”: Friedrich Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy; Alain Badiou, A Theatre Without Theatre; Jacques Derrida, “The Theatre of Cruelty and the Closure of Representation.”  For “Playwrights Writing on Philosophy”: George Bernard Shaw, The Quintessence of Ibsenism; Richard Schechner, The End of Humanism; Tony Kushner, Thinking about the Longstanding Problems of Virtue and Happiness.  For “Theatrically-Informed Philosophy”: Peter Sloterdijk, Thinker on Stage; Gilles Deleuze, Difference and Repetition; Judith Butler, Antigone’s Claim.  For “Philosophically-Informed Theatre”: George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman; Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit; Tom Stoppard, Jumpers; Caryl Churchill, Softcops; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Yasmina Reza, Art.

E 343L • Backgrounds Of Modern Lit-W

34835 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 206

Backgrounds of Modern Literature

English 344L
Class Unique Number: 34835
Spring 2010
PAR 206
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:00-6:30pm
Instructor: David Kornhaber
  Office: Parlin 22
  Email: david.kornhaber@mail.utexas.edu
  Office phone: 512-471-8712
   
Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 7:15 – 8:15pm

I. Description

In his 1905 preface to Major Barbara, George Bernard Shaw speaks of an intellectual "world movement" with proponents from Darwin to Nietzsche that had altered the scientific and philosophical thought of the nineteenth century and was in the process of transforming the literature of the next century as well. In this course, we will examine some of the central thinkers and texts of the 1800s and early 1900s that helped to lay the intellectual groundwork for the revolution in literary form and content known as Modern Literature. Ranging across science, philosophy, psychology, and politics, we will look at how a series of revolutionary ideas transformed contemporary notions of morality, consciousness, and even time and space themselves and how these intellectual developments ultimately shaped and were reflected in the new literary structures and thematics of the twentieth century. Major thinkers to be addressed in this class include Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche, and Freud. For our literary readings we will consider work across genres, with a special emphasis on dramatic literature as a tradition particularly engaged with philosophy and social thought. A background in philosophy is not required, and the course assumes no prior study in this area.

II. Course Requirements: 

1. Class attendance and participation policy:

    a. Attend all scheduled classes and arrive on time

  • Missed Classes: In the event you must miss a class, you can do so on 3 instances without it affecting your final grade.  These 3 missed classes do not need to be excused, but please let me know of your absence as far in advance as possible.  Beyond these 3 classes, all absences must be excused.  Reasons for excused absences include illness (with doctor’s note), team sports or approved activities, and family emergencies.  Any unexcused absences beyond the allowed 3 missed classes will lower your final class grade by 1/3 of a letter.
  • Religious Holy Days: By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

2. Course Readings/Materials:  

            a. Please refer to the end of this syllabus for a full list of required course readings
            b. Additional readings and materials may also be provided by the instructor in the form of handouts or electronic attachments throughout the course

3. Assignments, Assessment, and Evaluation

           a. Term papers and other assignments are due at the start of class on the dates listed in the Tentative Course Schedule unless otherwise rescheduled by the instructor
           b. Unless arrangements for an extension are made in advance with the instructor, late papers or assignments will be marked down 1/3 of a letter for every class period they are late
           c. All assignments and due dates listed are subject to change with notice from the instructor to better suit class development and progression

III. Grading Procedures:

Grades will be based on:

(a)  Class Participation / Reading Quizzes 15%
(b)  Short essay #1 (5 pages) 25%
(c)  Short essay #2 (5 pages) 25%
(d)  Long essay (8-10 pages) 35%

Participation will be evaluated based on periodic reading quizzes and frequency of engagement in the classroom discussion.  Engagement does not, however, mean verbal expression for its own sake.  Active listening and responding to peers are critical components of classroom engagement.  There is no particular quota for discussion contributions; rather the expectation is that all students will be continuously engaged in listening and responding to one another’s thoughts and opinions.

A list of potential topics for short and long essays will be distributed by the instructor prior to the due date for each assignment.  Students are welcome to develop their own paper topics for any of the assigned essays but must receive approval from the instructor for their topic prior to beginning the paper.  Papers will be evaluated not only on the quality of the ideas and supporting analysis presented but also on the effectiveness of the organization and communication of those ideas.  More specific expectations will be discussed in class at the time that paper topics are distributed.  Any student with questions regarding paper expectations should speak individually with the instructor prior to beginning the paper.

For each of the short papers, students will be assigned a revision partner; partners will exchange papers with one another prior to the submission date and provide peer feedback for each other.  In addition, students will be able to select one of the two short papers to revise for a new grade based on instructor feedback and direction, if they so choose.   

IV. Other University Notices and Policies

University of Texas Honor Code

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Documented Disability Statement

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone).  Faculty are not required to provide accommodations without an official accommodation letter from SSD.   

  • Please notify me as quickly as possible if the material being presented in class is not accessible (e.g., instructional videos need captioning, course packets are not readable for proper alternative text conversion, etc.).
  • Please notify me as early in the semester as possible if disability-related accommodations for field trips are required.  Advanced notice will permit the arrangement of accommodations on the given day (e.g., transportation, site accessibility, etc.).

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 379L • Contemporary Drama-W

35065 • Spring 2010
Meets MW 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 105

Contemporary Drama

English 379L
Class Unique Number: 35065
 
Spring 2010
PAR 105
Mondays and Wednesdays, 5:00-6:30

 

Instructor: David Kornhaber
  Office: Parlin 22
  Email: david.kornhaber@mail.utexas.edu
  Office phone: 512-471-8712
   
Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays 7:15 – 8:15pm

 

I. Description

This course presents an introduction to the major playwrights and themes of contemporary drama in the English-speaking world, focusing primarily on the United States and England.  Beginning with a consideration of the origins of contemporary drama in the theatrical revolutions of the late 1950s to 1970s, the course moves on to an examination of some of the major plays and playwrights of the last thirty years organized around three recurrent areas of concern: re-adaptations and revisions of classical themes and techniques; reflections on and reconsiderations of issues of modern identity, both personal and national; and epic re-stagings of history to current political ends.  Works will be considered as examples of dramatic literature in dialogue with their dramatic predecessors and contemporaries and as documents of contemporary theatrical culture, influenced and often determined by the institutional structures of New York’s Broadway and Off-Broadway or London’s West End and Fringe production arrangements.  

II. Course Requirements: 

   1. Class attendance and participation policy:

  • Attend all scheduled classes and arrive on time:
  1. ¤ Missed Classes: In the event you must miss a class, you can do so on 3 instances without it affecting your final grade.  These 3 missed classes do not need to be excused, but please let me know of your absence as far in advance as possible.  Beyond these 3 classes, all absences must be excused.  Reasons for excused absences include illness (with doctor’s note), team sports or approved activities, and family emergencies.  Any unexcused absences beyond the allowed 3 missed classes will lower your final class grade by 1/3 of a letter.
  2. ¤ Religious Holy Days: By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a religious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

   2. Course Readings/Materials: 

  • Please refer to the end of this syllabus for a full list of required course readings
  • Additional readings and materials may also be provided by the instructor in the form of handouts or electronic attachments throughout the course

   3. Assignments, Assessment, and Evaluation

  • Term papers and other assignments are due at the start of class on the dates listed in the Tentative Course Schedule unless otherwise rescheduled by the instructor
  • Unless arrangements for an extension are made in advance with the instructor, late papers or assignments will be marked down 1/3 of a letter for every class period they are late
  • All assignments and due dates listed are subject to change with notice from the instructor to better suit class development and progression

III. Grading Procedures:

Grades will be based on:

  • (a)  Class Participation / Reading Quizzes 15%
  • (b)  Short essay #1 (5 pages) 25%
  • (c)  Short essay #2 (5 pages) 25%
  • (d)  Long essay (8-10 pages) 35%

Participation will be evaluated based on periodic reading quizzes and frequency of engagement in the classroom discussion.  Engagement does not, however, mean verbal expression for its own sake.  Active listening and responding to peers are critical components of classroom engagement.  There is no particular quota for discussion contributions; rather the expectation is that all students will be continuously engaged in listening and responding to one another’s thoughts and opinions.

A list of potential topics for short and long essays will be distributed by the instructor prior to the due date for each assignment.  Students are welcome to develop their own paper topics for any of the assigned essays but must receive approval from the instructor for their topic prior to beginning the paper.  Papers will be evaluated not only on the quality of the ideas and supporting analysis presented but also on the effectiveness of the organization and communication of those ideas.  More specific expectations will be discussed in class at the time that paper topics are distributed.  Any student with questions regarding paper expectations should speak individually with the instructor prior to beginning the paper.

For each of the short papers, students will be assigned a revision partner; partners will exchange papers with one another prior to the submission date and provide peer feedback for each other.  In addition, students will be able to select one of the two short papers to revise for a new grade based on instructor feedback and direction, if they so choose. 

IV. Other University Notices and Policies

   University of Texas Honor Code

The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

   Documented Disability Statement

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone).  Faculty are not required to provide accommodations without an official accommodation letter from SSD. 

  • Please notify me as quickly as possible if the material being presented in class is not accessible (e.g., instructional videos need captioning, course packets are not readable for proper alternative text conversion, etc.).
  • Please notify me as early in the semester as possible if disability-related accommodations for field trips are required.  Advanced notice will permit the arrangement of accommodations on the given day (e.g., transportation, site accessibility, etc.).
  • Contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone) or reference SSD’s website for more disability-related information: http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/for_cstudents.php

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 369 • Twentieth-Century Drama

35198 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 306

TBD

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