The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas

Ernest Kaulbach


ProfessorPh.D., 1970, Cornell University

Distinguished Teaching Professor, Department of English
Ernest Kaulbach

Contact

Interests


Classics, English, Medieval Studies, Religious Studies, Language and linguistics

Courses


C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

33530 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105
(also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  35255

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:  This is a course in early Classics:  Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East.  We will read nothing written after the 1400s.  Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible.  Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important.

Texts:  Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd edition, Volume A; Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Requirements & Grading:  An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam.  To receive an “A” you must have an “A” in all three areas; same for a “B”.  If you fail any area, you fail the class.  Miss more than two classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

E 317C • Classics And Classes

35265 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CAL 200

E 317C  l  Classics and Classes

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  35265

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:  First, what do we mean by “Classics.”  Second, how a socio-economic class, or ethnic/color/geographic class, or age/IQ class affects our reception of these “Classics.”

Method:  To begin, you will make up a list of your “Classics” and I will make up a list of my “Classics.”  We’ll make a hybrid list (yours and mine); we’ll read the list; for each choice, we’ll write the required essay (writing component) as a group.  In the process, we’ll find out how to summarize, dumb down, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by turning them into Cliff Notes, Wikipedia Articles, video games, cartoons, commercial movies or SAT questions.  The point of this: to define what is a “Classic” and what parts of that “Classic” are essential to our present culture.

Texts:  are up to us.  We will begin A) with a list of “Classics” (give me at least 10, prioritized by next class) and B) with a decision to join a “class” (social, economic, ethnic, color, age, region, etc.).

Requirements & Grading:  paper(s) -60% of your grade; attendance/discussion -40% of your grade (miss more than 2 classes and I’ll drop your grade by one full letter).

E 375K • Satire

35525 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 105

E 375K  l  English and American Satire

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  35525

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay and move into some of the well-known authors (e.g., Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce).  All the previous introduce what “satire” means.  At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence).  Most time is devoted to contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

Texts:  Xeroxes (for two wks); paperbacks of readings we choose to do (order online by ISBN).

Requirements & Grading:  Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc., no matter how you score on your papers or the exam.  You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort.  In any case, you must attend class, and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B” on the final, to get an “A” or “B”.

E S375K • Satire

82150 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 103

E s375K  l  Satire

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  82150

Semester:  Summer 2016, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay, and move into some of the well-known authors (Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce).  All the previous introduce what “satire” means.  At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence).  Usually we’ve spent most of the semester on contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

The readings could change.  Please let me know what you want to read.

Texts:  Packet of readings from IT Copy Service (MLK next to Fire Station); Paperbacks of readings we choose to do.

Requirements & Grading:  Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%).  More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc.  You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort.  In any case, you must attend and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B”.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

32865 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 105
(also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  34450

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important.

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd edition, Volume A; Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Requirements & Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an “A” you must have an “A” in all three areas; same for a “B”. If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than two classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

E 317C • Classics And Classes

34470 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 310

E 317C  l  Classics and Classes

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  34470

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: First, what do we mean by “Classics.” Second, how a socio-economic class, or ethnic/color/geographic class, or age/IQ class affects our reception of these “Classics.”

Method: To begin, you will make up a list of your “Classics” and I will make up a list of my “Classics.” We’ll make a hybrid list (yours and mine); we’ll read the list; for each choice, we’ll write the required essay (writing component) as a group. In the process, we’ll find out how to summarize, dumb down, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by turning them into Cliff Notes, Wikipedia Articles, video games, cartoons, commercial movies or SAT questions. The point of this: to define what is a “Classic” and what parts of that “Classic” are essential to our present culture.

Texts: are up to us. We will begin A) with a list of “Classics” (give me at least 10, prioritized by next class) and B) with a decision to join a “class” (social, economic, ethnic, color, age, region, etc.).

Requirements & Grading: (paper(s) -60% of your grade; attendance/discussion -40% of your grade (miss more than 2 classes and I’ll drop your grade by one full letter).

E 375K • Satire

34760 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105

E 375K  l  English and American Satire

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  34760

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay and move into some of the well-known authors (e.g., Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduce what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Most time is devoted to contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

Texts: Xeroxes (for two wks); paperbacks of readings we choose to do (order online by ISBN).

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc., no matter how you score on your papers or the exam. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend class, and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B” on the final, to get an “A” or “B”.

E 317C • Classics And Classes

34395 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CAL 200

E 317C  l  Classics and Classes

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  34395

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: First, what do we mean by “Classics.” Second, how a socio-economic class, or ethnic/color/geographic class, or age/IQ class affects our reception of these “Classics.”

Method: To begin, you will make up a list of your “Classics” and I will make up a list of my “Classics.” We’ll make a hybrid list (yours and mine); we’ll read the list; for each choice, we’ll write the required essay (writing component) as a group. In the process, we’ll find out how to summarize, dumb down, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by turning them into Cliff Notes, Wikipedia Articles, video games, cartoons, commercial movies or SAT questions. The point of this: to define what is a “Classic” and what parts of that “Classic” are essential to our present culture.

Texts: are up to us. We will begin A) with a list of “Classics” (give me at least 10, prioritized by next class) and B) with a decision to join a “class” (social, economic, ethnic, color, age, region, etc.).

Requirements & Grading: (paper(s) -60% of your grade; attendance/discussion -40% of your grade (miss more than 2 classes and I’ll drop your grade by one full letter).

E 358K • Bible In British And Amer Lit

34550 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 105
(also listed as R S 355K)

E 358K  l  The Bible in British and American Literature

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  34550

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  R S 355K

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The titles, “Paradise Lost” or “East of Eden” or even “Wealth of Nations,” tell us right off that the subject matter so titled has some relationship to the Bible: Adam and Eve lost Paradise, one brother killed another, the wealth of the world makes a pilgrimage to England. Our textbook sets passages from the Bible right next to extracts from these works of English and American literature.

In this class, we will explicate the extract in terms of the Biblical passage to develop some interpretive skills. We will learn about the author’s use of Biblical allegory, typology and the such which give his/her work sobriety; but we will also learn about the author’s use of irony, bathos and the such which make his/her work more lively.

Texts: The Bible and Literature: a Reader, D. Jasper and S. Prickett

Requirements & Grading: Writing assignments 50%, class attendance 50% (do not miss more than two classes unless you want to have your grade reduced one full letter).

E S375K • English And American Satire

82800 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 204

E s375K  l  English and American Satire

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  82800

Semester:  Summer 2015, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay, and move into some of the well-known authors (Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduce what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Usually we’ve spent most of the semester on contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

The readings could change. Please let me know what you want to read.

Texts: Packet of readings from IT Copy Service (MLK next to Fire Station); Paperbacks of readings we choose to do.

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B”.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

33105 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105
(also listed as E 316N)

E 316N  l  World Literature

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  34625

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Global Cultures

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important.

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd edition, Volume A; Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Requirements & Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an “A” you must have an “A” in all three areas; same for a “B”. If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than two classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

E 317C • Classics And Classes

34630 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 1.102

E 317C  l  Classics and Classes

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  34630

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Writing

English 314J (Topic: Classics and Classes) and 317C may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: First, what do we mean by “Classics.” Second, how a socio-economic class, or ethnic/color/geographic class, or age/IQ class affects our reception of these “Classics.”

Method: To begin, you will make up a list of your “Classics” and I will make up a list of my “Classics.” We’ll make a hybrid list (yours and mine); we’ll read the list; for each choice, we’ll write the required essay (writing component) as a group. In the process, we’ll find out how to summarize, dumb down, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by turning them into Cliff Notes, Wikipedia Articles, video games, cartoons, commercial movies or SAT questions. The point of this: to define what is a “Classic” and what parts of that “Classic” are essential to our present culture.

This class helps to prepare students for success in the English major by making them better readers, writers, and thinkers, by teaching basic research skills, and by providing models for approaching literature with various historical and cultural contexts in mind.

Texts: are up to us. We will begin A) with a list of “Classics” (give me at least 10, prioritized by next class) and B) with a decision to join a “class” (social, economic, ethnic, color, age, region, etc.).

Requirements & Grading: (paper(s) -60% of your grade; attendance/discussion -40% of your grade (miss more than 2 classes and I’ll drop your grade by one full letter).

E 375K • English And American Satire

34915 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 310

E 375K  l  English and American Satire

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  34915

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay and move into some of the well-known authors (e.g., Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduces what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Most time is devoted to contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

Texts: Xeroxes (for two wks); paperbacks of readings we choose to do (order online by ISBN).

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc., no matter how you score on your papers or the exam. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend, write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B” on the final, to get an “A” or “B”.

C L 315 • Masterworks Of World Lit

33895 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 204
(also listed as E 316N)

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  35600

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  C L 315

Flags:  Global Cultures

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important.

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd edition, Volume A; Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Requirements & Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an “A” you must have an “A” in all three areas; same for a “B”. If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than two classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

CTI 345 • Bible As Literature

34205 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105
(also listed as E 358J, R S 355)

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  35860

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  CTI 345, R S 355

Flags:  Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316L (or 316K), 316M (or 316K), 316N (or 316K), or 316P (or 316K), or T C 603B.

Description: Become familiar with the principal texts, interpretations, and images of the Old and New Testaments, so as to be able to recognize the use of the Bible in any form of literature, e.g., sciences, history, medicine, law, music, art, etc. Since the West depends upon the interpretation of “Alexandria,” that's the interpretation we will study, although we will find that the West incorporates Jewish, Muslim, and pagan interpretations (as indicated by the required second text).

A list of readings will be distributed on the first class day. Students will be expected to read them all, even though I spend half of the semester only on Genesis.

Texts: Any RSV (Revised Standard Version) Bible; The Bible As It Was, James L. Kugel.

Requirements & Grading: Papers (50%), attendance (25%), final (25%); have to attain “A” in all three areas or “B” in all three areas to receive the respective “A” or “B.”

E S375K • English And American Satire

83440 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM MEZ 2.124

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  83440

Semester:  Summer 2014, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay, and move into some of the well-known authors (Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduce what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Usually we’ve spent most of the semester on contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

The readings could change. Please let me know what you want to read.

Texts: Packet of readings from IT Copy Service (MLK next to Fire Station); Paperbacks of readings we choose to do.

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B”.

E 314J • Classics And Classes

35140 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 103

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  35140

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: First, what do we mean by “Classics.” Second, how a socio-economic class, or ethnic/color/geographic class, or age/IQ class affects our reception of these “Classics.”

Method: To begin, you will make up a list of your “Classics” and I will make up a list of my “Classics.” We’ll make a hybrid list (yours and mine); we’ll read the list; for each choice, we’ll write the required essay (writing component) as a group. In the process, we’ll find out how to summarize, dumb down, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by turning them into Cliff Notes, Wikipedia Articles, video games, cartoons, commercial movies or SAT questions. The point of this: to define what is a “Classic” and what parts of that “Classic” are essential to our present culture.

This class helps to prepare students for success in the English major by making them better readers, writers, and thinkers, by teaching basic research skills, and by providing models for approaching literature with various historical and cultural contexts in mind.

Texts: are up to us. We will begin A) with a list of “Classics” (give me at least 10, prioritized by next class) and B) with a decision to join a “class” (social, economic, ethnic, color, age, region, etc.).

Requirements & Grading: (paper(s) -60% of your grade; attendance/discussion -40% of your grade (miss more than 2 classes and I’ll drop your grade by one full letter).

E 375K • English And American Satire

36177 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 206

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  36177

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay and move into some of the well-known authors (e.g., Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduces what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Most time is devoted to contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

Texts: Xeroxes (for two wks); paperbacks of readings we choose to do (order online by ISBN).

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc., no matter how you score on your papers or the exam. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend, write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B” on the final, to get an “A” or “B”.

E 376 • Chaucer

36180 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 210

 Instructor:  Kaulbach, E

Unique #:  36180

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Description: Readings of The Canterbury Tales with as much attention to the language and background of the literature as is possible. For the first few weeks, emphasis falls on language. For the rest of the semester, emphasis on backgrounds of the literature. Please keep ahead of me. I’ll be going slowly.

Readings: General Prologue

               Knight’s Tale

               Miller’s Tale

               Nuns’ Priest’s Tale

               Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale

               Clerk’s Tale

               Merchant’s Tale

               Franklin’s Tale

               Parson’s Prologue and Chaucer’s Retractation

Text: Hieatt, The Canterbury Tales (Bantam PB)

Requirements: quizzes on the language; final paper or exam; daily attendance. Do not miss more than two classes.

Grades: Class attendance (33%), language quizzes (33%), final exam or paper (33%): you must have an

“A” in all three areas to receive an “A.”.           

CTI 345 • The Bible As Literature

34245 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105
(also listed as E 358J, R S 355)

History of the Exegesis of the Septuagint (Greek) Bible to reference the use of the Bible in Art, Law, Medicine, Science, Literature, Music, etc. up to 1500 CE. Progress assessed by short quizzes and final exam, although the principal assessment will be determined by a lengthy research paper (done and edited in stages).

 

Texts:

Any RSV version of the Bible.

 

Grading:

1.) attendance2.) weekly quizzes3.) final4.) paper.To receive an “A,” one must have an “A” in all four areas (same for “B”). A lesser grade “B” or “C” means that the student receives the lesser grade for the entire course. Miss more than two classes and you receive a “B.”

E 314J • Classics And Classes

34910 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 308

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34910            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: How are literary classics made, and what do they themselves make? What is the relationship between the Classics and various classes, or categories, of identity, whether socioeconomic, ethnic/racial, sexual, or generational? Do the Classics themselves support the division of people into different classes? What about popular adaptations of and glosses on the Classics?

For the first weeks, this class will forget, dumb down, downsize, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by going online: regarding them as Cliff Notes, Spark Notes, Wikipedia Articles, PBS Dramas, commercial movies, Commercials or even “Ms. (School) Marm’s Helpful Hints.” In the next few weeks of this course, we will go offline – to the library – to find works (poetry, drama, fiction) inspired by the original texts (of Milton, Bible, Shakespeare, Chaucer, etc.). For the rest of the semester, we’ll be reading the original texts, line by line.

This class helps to prepare students for success in the English major by making them better readers, writers, and thinkers, by teaching basic research skills, and by providing models for approaching literature with various historical and cultural contexts in mind.

Texts: Texts to be selected from among the following.King James Bible; Wycliffe Bible; “Chapman’s Homer”; Rushdie’s Qu’ran; Shakespeare (Sonnet, Tempest, Historical Play); Chaucer (Chaucer’s Dante, Boethius, Boccaccio, Jean de Meun?); Voyage of the Beagle; Milton, Samson Agonistes; Dryden’s Aeneis; Alice in Wonderland; Biography of Malcolm X; M.S. Bell, All Souls’ Rising; Ramayana/Adam’s Bridge; Hakluyt’s Voyages.

Requirements & Grading: Requirements: Short response papers and critical essays, consistent engagement with our reading and with class discussion, final exam.

Grades: 50% (papers), 30% (interaction with texts/other class members), 20% (final exam).

E F375K • English And American Satire

83585 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM CLA 1.102

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  83585            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay, and move into some of the well-known authors (Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduce what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Usually we’ve spent most of the semester on contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

The readings could change. Please let me know what you want to read.

Texts: Packet of readings from IT Copy Service (MLK next to Fire Station); Paperbacks of readings we choose to do.

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B”.

E 358K • Bible In British And Amer Lit

35550 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 308
(also listed as R S 355K)

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  V / U

Unique #:  35550            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The titles, “Paradise Lost” or “East of Eden” or even “Wealth of Nations,” tell us right off that the subject matter so titled has some relationship to the Bible: Adam and Eve lost Paradise, one brother killed another, the wealth of the world makes a pilgrimage to England. Our textbook sets passages from the Bible right next to extracts from these works of English and American literature.

In this class, we will explicate the extract in terms of the Biblical passage to develop some interpretive skills. We will learn about the author’s use of Biblical allegory, typology and the such which give his/her work sobriety; but we will also learn about the author’s use of irony, bathos and the such which make his/her work more lively.

Texts: The Bible and Literature: a Reader, D. Jasper and S. Prickett

Requirements & Grading: Writing assignments 50%, class attendance 50% (do not miss more than two classes unless you want to have your grade reduced one full letter).

E 375K • English And American Satire

35665 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35665            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay, and move into some of the well-known authors (Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduce what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Usually we’ve spent most of the semester on contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

The readings could change.  Please let me know what you want to read.

Texts: Packet of readings from IT Copy Service (MLK next to Fire Station); Paperbacks of readings we choose to do.

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B”.

LAT 316 • Intermediate Latin II: Poetry

33585 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GAR 1.134

This course surveys a vast and varied literature, e.g., chronicle, science, theology, philosophy, art history, law. Students choose the readings because their needs vary.

 

In past courses, we have read the Vulgate Bible, liturgies, "Pervigilium Veneris," manuscripts, chronicles of the Goths, travelogues, mythography, geography, saints' lives, commentaries on Virgil/ Cicero/ Plato, macaronic texts (Latin and/or Greek, vernacular), even Grammatical texts.

 

Assignments: only daily translation, unless you need to write a paper. Show up for every class, be prepared to translate and know how to look into difficult constructions ("habere" plus infinitive) and words ("sule").

 

Prerequisites:  LAT 311 or 312K or 312M with a grade of A or consent of the instructor.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

35280 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CBA 4.326
(also listed as C L 315)

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35280            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important.

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd edition, Volume A; Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Requirements & Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an “A” you must have an “A” in all three areas; same for a “B”. If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than two classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

E 375K • English And American Satire

35640 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  III / U

Unique #:  35640            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay, and move into some of the well-known authors (Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduce what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Usually we’ve spent most of the semester on contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

The readings could change.  Please let me know what you want to read.

Texts: Packet of readings from IT Copy Service (MLK next to Fire Station); Paperbacks of readings we choose to do.

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B”.

E S314J • Classics And Classes

83815 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 204

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  83815            Flags:  Writing

Semester: Summer 2012, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: How are literary classics made, and what do they themselves make? What is the relationship between the Classics and various classes, or categories, of identity, whether socioeconomic, ethnic/racial, sexual, or generational? Do the Classics themselves support the division of people into different classes? What about popular adaptations of and glosses on the Classics?

For the first weeks, this class will forget, dumb down, downsize, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by going online: regarding them as Cliff Notes, Spark Notes, Wikipedia Articles, PBS Dramas, commercial movies, Commercials or even “Ms. (School) Marm’s Helpful Hints.” In the next few weeks of this course, we will go offline – to the library – to find works (poetry, drama, fiction) inspired by the original texts (of Milton, Bible, Shakespeare, Chaucer, etc.). For the rest of the semester, we’ll be reading the original texts, line by line.

This class helps to prepare students for success in the English major by making them better readers, writers, and thinkers, by teaching basic research skills, and by providing models for approaching literature with various historical and cultural contexts in mind.

Texts: Texts to be selected from among the following. King James Bible; Wycliffe Bible; “Chapman’s Homer”; Rushdie’s Qu’ran; Shakespeare (Sonnet, Tempest, Historical Play); Chaucer (Chaucer’s Dante, Boethius, Boccaccio, Jean de Meun?); Voyage of the Beagle; Milton, Samson Agonistes; Dryden’s Aeneis; Alice in Wonderland; Biography of Malcolm X; M.S. Bell, All Souls’ Rising; Ramayana/Adam’s Bridge; Hakluyt’s Voyages.

Requirements & Grading: Requirements: Short response papers and critical essays, consistent engagement with our reading and with class discussion, final exam.

Grades: 50% (papers), 30% (interaction with texts/other class members), 20% (final exam).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

35145 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 308
(also listed as C L 315)

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35145            Flags:  Global cultures

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  C L 315            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important.

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd edition, Volume A; Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Requirements & Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an “A” you must have an “A” in all three areas; same for a “B”. If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than two classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

E 324 • English As A Language Of Law

35200 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105

Instructor:  Kaulbach, E            Areas:  n/a

Unique #:  35200            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 322 and 324 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Only one of the following may be counted unless the topics vary: E 320M, 324, 376L, 379M, 379N.

May not be counted toward a major in English.

Prerequisites: C L 315, E 603B, 316K, or T C 603B.

Description: We will study the early history of English Law by learning the early meaning of legal terminology, e.g., the meaning of “law,” “fee,” “lord,” “sake,” “moot,” “ court,” “plea,” “procedure,” “brief,” etc. We will begin with the terms from Alfred (Anglo-Saxon), work our way through terms from Henry I and II (Anglo-Norman), and add on elements from Latin, Old Norse and German.

Texts: TBA—special arrangement with publisher.

Requirements & Grading: Short ½-page papers. Grades:  1/3 attendance, 1/3 papers, 1/3 final exam—not averaged (you have to have an “A” in all three areas to earn an “A”).

LAT 316 • Intermediate Latin II: Poetry

33445 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 214

This course surveys a vast and varied literature, e.g., chronicle, science, theology, philosophy, art history, law. Students choose the readings because their needs vary.

 

In past courses, we have read the Vulgate Bible, liturgies, "Pervigilium Veneris," manuscripts, chronicles of the Goths, travelogues, mythography, geography, saints' lives, commentaries on Virgil/ Cicero/ Plato, macaronic texts (Latin and/or Greek, vernacular), even Grammatical texts.

 

Assignments: only daily translation, unless you need to write a paper. Show up for every class, be prepared to translate and know how to look into difficult constructions ("habere" plus infinitive) and words ("sule").

 

Prerequisites:  LAT 311 or 312K or 312M with a grade of A or consent of the instructor.

E 314J • Classics And Classes

34500 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 310

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: How are literary classics made, and what do they themselves make? What is the relationship between the Classics and various classes, or categories, of identity, whether socioeconomic, ethnic/racial, sexual, or generational? Do the Classics themselves support the division of people into different classes? What about popular adaptations of and glosses on the Classics?

For the first weeks, this class will forget, dumb down, downsize, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by going online: regarding them as Cliff Notes, Spark Notes, Wikipedia Articles, PBS Dramas, commercial movies, Commercials or even “Ms. (School) Marm’s Helpful Hints.” In the next few weeks of this course, we will go offline – to the library – to find works (poetry, drama, fiction) inspired by the original texts (of Milton, Bible, Shakespeare, Chaucer, etc.). For the rest of the semester, we’ll be reading the original texts, line by line.

This class helps to prepare students for success in the English major by making them better readers, writers, and thinkers, by teaching basic research skills, and by providing models for approaching literature with various historical and cultural contexts in mind. 

Texts: Texts to be selected from among the following. King James Bible; Wycliffe Bible; “Chapman’s Homer”; Rushdie’s Qu’ran; Shakespeare (Sonnet, Tempest, Historical Play); Chaucer (Chaucer’s Dante, Boethius, Boccaccio, Jean de Meun?); Voyage of the Beagle; Milton, Samson Agonistes; Dryden’s Aeneis; Alice in Wonderland; Biography of Malcolm X; M.S. Bell, All Souls’ Rising; Ramayana/Adam’s Bridge; Hakluyt’s Voyages.

Requirements & Grading: Requirements: Short response papers and critical essays, consistent engagement with our reading and with class discussion, final exam.

Grades: 50% (papers), 30% (interaction with texts/other class members), 20% (final exam).

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

35110 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 304
(also listed as C L 315)

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important. 

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd ed., Volume A; ?Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee?; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; ?Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Requirements & Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your final grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an "A" you must have an "A" in all three areas; same for a "B". If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than 2 classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

35115 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 310
(also listed as C L 315)

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important. 

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd ed., Volume A; ?Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee?; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; ?Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Requirements & Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your final grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an "A" you must have an "A" in all three areas; same for a "B". If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than 2 classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

E S375K • English And American Satire

83835 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 204

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay, and move into some of the well-known authors (Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduce what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Usually we’ve spent most of the semester on contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita).

 

The readings could change. Please let me know what you want to read.

 

Texts: Packet of readings from IT Copy Service (MLK next to Fire Station); Paperbacks of readings we choose to do.

 

Requirements & Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B”.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

35365 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 308
(also listed as C L 315)

Prerequisites: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

Course Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important.

Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd ed., Volume A; ?Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee?; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; ?Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your final grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an "A" you must have an "A" in all three areas; same for a "B". If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than 2 classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

E 324 • English As A Language Of Law

35424 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.122

This couse is not applicable to the English Degree.

 

We will study the History of Early English Law by way of learning terms and

 meaning of law terms, e.g., “law,” “case,” “fee,” “tenant,” “sake,” “moot,” “plea,” “procedure,”

 “brief.” We will start with Anglo-Saxon terms, proceed to Anglo-Norman terms and add on

terms and notions borrowed from Latin (Rome), Old Norse (Vikings) and German (Riparian).

The three texts: Alfred’s Saxon, Henry I’s and II’s (Anglo-Norman/Latin) and the “Pleas of the

Crown” (Anglo-Norman Justices in Eyre, Old French with facing English translation). We will

not go much beyond 1300.

 

Requirements: upper division standing, short papers/quizzes, final exam.

 

Grades: assigned on attendance, papers/quizzes, final. You have to have an “A” in all three

areas to earn an “A.” Miss more than two classes and I will drop your grade one full letter.

 

Texts: all texts are Xeroxed, at IT Copy (next to Firehouse on MLK)

E 358J • The Bible As Literature

35645 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 103
(also listed as R S 355)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Become familiar with the principal texts, interpretations, and images of the Old and New Testaments, so as to be able to recognize the use of the Bible in any form of literature, e.g., sciences, history, medicine, law, music, art, etc. Since the West depends upon the interpretation of “Alexandria,” that's the interpretation we will study, although we will find that the West incorporates Jewish, Muslim, and pagan interpretations (as indicated by the required second text).

See the attached list of Readings and read them all, even though I spend half of the semester only on Genesis.

Texts: Any RSV (Revised Standard Version) Bible; The Bible As It Was, James L. Kugel.

Requirements & Grading: Papers (50%), attendance (25%), final (25%); have to attain “A” in all three areas or “B” in all three areas to receive the respective “A” or “B.”

LAT 316 • Intermediate Latin II: Poetry

33715 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 308

This course surveys a vast and varied literature, e.g., chronicle, science, theology, philosophy, art history, law. Students choose the readings because their needs vary.

In past courses, we have read the Vulgate Bible, liturgies, "Pervigilium Veneris," manuscripts, chronicles of the Goths, travelogues, mythography, geography, saints' lives, commentaries on Virgil/ Cicero/ Plato, macaronic texts (Latin and/or Greek, vernacular), even Grammatical texts.

Assignments: only daily translation, unless you need to write a paper. Show up for every class, be prepared to translate and know how to look into difficult constructions ("habere" plus infinitive) and words ("sule").

Prerequisites:  LAT 311 or 312K or 312M with a grade of A or consent of the instructor.

E 314J • Classics And Classes

33783 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 310

Course Description: How are literary classics made, and what do they themselves make? What is the relationship between the Classics and various classes, or categories, of identity, whether socioeconomic, ethnic/racial, sexual, or generational? Do the Classics themselves support the division of people into different classes? What about popular adaptations of and glosses on the Classics? For the first weeks, this class will forget, dumb down, downsize, revise or bowdlerize the Classics by going online: regarding them as Cliff Notes, Spark Notes, Wikipedia Articles, PBS Dramas, commercial movies, Commercials or even “Ms. (School) Marm’s Helpful Hints.” In the next few weeks of this course, we will go offline – to the library – to find works (poetry, drama, fiction) inspired by the original texts (of Milton, Bible, Shakespeare, Chaucer, etc.). For the rest of the semester, we’ll be reading the original texts, line by line. This class helps to prepare students for success in the English major by making them better readers, writers, and thinkers, by teaching basic research skills, and by providing models for approaching literature with various historical and cultural contexts in mind.

Texts: Texts to be selected from among the following. King James Bible; Wycliffe Bible; “Chapman’s Homer”; Rushdie’s Qu’ran; Shakespeare (Sonnet, Tempest, Historical Play); Chaucer (Chaucer’s Dante, Boethius, Boccaccio, Jean de Meun?); Voyage of the Beagle; Milton, Samson Agonistes; Dryden’s Aeneis; Alice in Wonderland; Biography of Malcolm X; M.S. Bell, All Souls’ Rising; Ramayana/Adam’s Bridge; Hakluyt’s Voyages.

Grading: Requirements: Short response papers and critical essays, consistent engagement with our reading and with class discussion, final exam. Grades: 50% (papers), 30% (interaction with texts/other class members), 20% (final exam).

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

E 316K • Masterworks Of Lit: World

34405 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 310
Restricted to students in the Longhorn Scholars Program.


Course Description: This is a course in early Classics: Classics of the West, of Africa, of the Middle East, and of the Far East. We will read nothing written after the 1400s. Works will be interpreted by teachers of the works, as nearly contemporaneous with the works as possible. Class lectures will tell you how and why these selections are important.
Texts: Norton Anthology of World Literature, 2nd ed., Volume A; ?Timaeus and Critias, ed. Desmond Lee?; Sundiata, ed. D.T. Niane; ?Xerox packet (at IT Copy and Printing, on corner of MLK & Lavaca).

Grading: An average of three areas, each of which counts 1/3 of your final grade: attendance and quizzes, mid-term essay, final exam. To receive an "A" you must have an "A" in all three areas; same for a "B". If you fail any area, you fail the class. Miss more than 2 classes and your attendance grade is reduced by one full grade.

Prerequisites:
Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework, including E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A, and a passing score on the reading section of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test.

E S375K • English And American Satire

83300 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 105

Course Description: The course will begin with some older models for satire (Horace, Boethius, Chaucer, for example), a critical essay, and move into some of the well-known authors (Dryden, Swift, Pope, Irving, Twain, Bierce). All the previous introduce what “satire” means. At this point, we sometimes read pieces suggested by you and could read pieces never intended to be satirical (e.g., Bible or Declaration of Independence). Usually we’ve spent most of the semester on contemporary works (Loved One, Confederacy of Dunces, Clockwork Orange, Catch 22, Doctor Strangelove, Lolita). The readings could change. Please let me know what you want to read.

Texts: Packet of readings from IT Copy Service (MLK next to Fire Station); Paperbacks of readings we choose to do.

Grading: Final Grade is comprised of attendance (33%), short papers (33%), and final paper or exam (33%). More than 2 absences will result in a “B” for final grade, more than 4 a “C,” etc. You may rewrite papers for a higher grade if the original paper showed some effort. In any case, you must attend and write “A” or “B” papers to get an “A” or “B”.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

LAT 316 • Lyric Poetry: Clas & Medieval

32942 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CBA 4.336

Continuation of Latin 311. Selected readings from classical and medieval poets.

E 375K • English And American Satire

35215 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105

TBD

LAT 316 • Lyric Poetry: Clas & Medieval

32430 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 214

Continuation of Latin 311. Selected readings from classical and medieval poets.

LAT 385 • Paleography

31060 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM WAG 112

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

LAT 316 • Adv Lyric Poetry: Clas & Medvl

28915 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM WAG 112

Continuation of Latin 311. Selected readings from classical and medieval poets.

LAT 316 • Adv Lyric Poetry: Clas & Medvl

28495 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 208

Continuation of Latin 311. Selected readings from classical and medieval poets.

LAT 385 • Patristics

28550 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 10

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

LAT 316 • Adv Lyric Poetry: Clas & Medvl

28670 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 308

Continuation of Latin 311. Selected readings from classical and medieval poets.

LAT 385 • Paleography

29490 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM BAT 217

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

LAT 316 • Adv Lyric Poetry: Clas & Medvl

29015 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 306

Continuation of Latin 311. Selected readings from classical and medieval poets.

LAT 316 • Adv Lyric Poetry: Clas & Medvl

28410 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WEL 3.422

Continuation of Latin 311. Selected readings from classical and medieval poets.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages