Center for Perceptual Systems

Jon Matthis

Jon’s research focuses primarily on the visual control of human walking, with an emphasis on the way that the biomechanics of bipedal gait shapes the use of visual information during locomotion over real world rough terrain. To this end, he has developed an apparatus that accurately records full-body motion capture and eye tracking data of people walking outdoors over real-world rocky terrain. Using this data, he hopes to explain the way that humans use eye movements to extract information from their environment in order to facilitate stable and efficient locomotion over complex and difficult terrain.

            Publications

Matthis, J.S., Barton, S.L, Fajen, B.R. (2017). The critical control phase for the visual control of walking over complex terrain. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences., 114(30) doi: 10.1073/pnas.1611699114
 
Matthis, J.S., Barton, S.L, Fajen, B.R. (2015). The biomechanics of walking shape the use of visual information during locomotion over complex terrain. Journal of Vision.15(3). 1-13. doi: 10.1167/15.3.10
 
Matthis, J. S. & Fajen, B. R. (2014). Visual control of foot placement when walking over complex terrain.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. 40(1). 106-15. doi: 10.1037/a0033101
 
Matthis, J. S. & Fajen, B. R. (2013). Humans exploit the biomechanics of bipedal gait during visually guided walking over complex terrain. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 280(1762). 1-9.
 
Fajen, B. R., Parade, M. S., & Matthis, J. S. (2013). Humans perceive object motion in world coordinates during obstacle avoidance. Journal of Vision, 13(8), 1-13. doi: 10.1167/13.8.25.doi
 
Fajen, B. R., & Matthis, J. S. (2013). Visual and non-visual contributions to the perception of object motion during self-motion. PLoS ONE 8(2), 1-12. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0055446
 
Fajen, B. R., & Matthis, J. S. (2011). Direct perception of action-scaled affordances: The shrinking gap problem. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37(5), 1442-1457.  doi: 10.1037/a0023510