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WGS 301 • Black Queer Art Worlds

46755 • Gill, Lyndon
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WEL 3.402
(also listed as AFR 317E, ANT 310L)
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Exploration of over two decades of work produced by and about black queer subjects throughout the circum-Atlantic world. Provides an introduction to various artists and intellectuals of the black queer diaspora, as well as an examination of the viability of black queer aesthetic practice as a form of theorizing.


WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

46745 • Mena, Olivia
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as AMS 315, MAS 311, SOC 308D)
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Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term, “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest United States, such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the United States, including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will be engaging in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also in relation to the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film. By the end of this course, it is my hope that you will not only be more critical readers and thinkers, but that you will also be able to apply themes and elements from the readings and discussions to your understanding of your own experiences.

Readings:

Anzaldúa, Gloria and Moraga, Cherríe eds. (2015) This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color.

 Anzaldúa, Gloria (2015) Light in the Dark Luz en lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity,  Spirituality, Reality.

 


WGS 301 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

46740 • Mena, Olivia
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as AMS 315, MAS 311, SOC 308D)
show description

Description:

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term, “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest United States, such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the United States, including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will be engaging in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also in relation to the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film. By the end of this course, it is my hope that you will not only be more critical readers and thinkers, but that you will also be able to apply themes and elements from the readings and discussions to your understanding of your own experiences.

 READINGS

Anzaldúa, Gloria and Moraga, Cherríe eds. (2015) This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color.

 Anzaldúa, Gloria (2015) Light in the Dark Luz en lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity,  Spirituality, Reality.

 


WGS 301 • Gay & Lesbian Lit & Culture

46750 • Frank, Sarah
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 104
(also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  l  4-Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture

 

Instructor:  Frank, S

Unique #:  35000

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  WGS 301

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  Yes

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  In this course, students will be introduced to fiction, poetry, and criticism by gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans, and/or queer writers.  Readings, discussions, and assignments will situate contemporary queer literature in historical context, emphasizing the role of important movements and events—including the Stonewall Riots, lesbian feminism, the AIDS epidemic, and drag and ball culture—in shaping modern queer and LGBT identities.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Larry Kramer, The Normal Heart; Jennie Livingston, Paris is Burning.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  The remaining 25% of the final grade will be based on informal blog posts and participation in online and in-class discussion and activities.


WGS 301 • Race, Immigration & Family

46760 • Gunasena, Natassja
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CMA 5.190
(also listed as AAS 310, AMS 315)
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Flag: Culutural Diversity in the U.S.

Queer South Asian Feminisims This class will interrogate the ways South Asian feminists conceptualize identity, belonging and sexuality within the context of nationalism, anti-blackness, colonialism and diaspora. Through close-reading literary and theoretical texts, we will examine how nationalism constructs gender and femininity and the transformative potential of queer feminine desires. This class is designed as an introduction to key issues in South Asian feminist thought as well as how these feminisms interface with the larger project of women of color feminisms. Beginning with feminist perspectives on identity and the nation state, we will consider what “queer” and “feminist” mean in the context of casteism, ethnic cleansing and forced migration. For the scope of this class we will focus extensively on Sri Lanka and India and their diasporas. Some of the authors we look at include Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, Shailja Patel, Ru Freeman and Gayatri Gopinath.


WGS 301 • Race/Gender/Education At Ut

46720 • Tinsley, Natasha
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 208
(also listed as AFR 317D)
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Description:

While the struggles of black and Latino men in higher education have gained much-needed visibility in the last decade, the challenges faced by women of color in university settings continue even as they are increasingly invisibilized. This course opens inquiry about the resources and skills that women of color need to succeed in higher education in general, and at the University of Texas in particular. Through interdisciplinary readings, we will explore avenues for women of color to bolster their academic, social, physical, emotional, and sexual wellbeing while pursuing advanced degrees.

  

 Readings:

  • Nnedi Okafor, Binti
  • Gabriella Gutierrez y Muhs, Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia
  • Theodora Regina Berry, From Oppression to Grace: Women of Color and Their Dilemmas in the Academy
  • Esmeralda Santiago, Almost a Woman

  

Grading:

3 papers, 20%/each

Class participation, 40%


WGS 301 • Rights In Modern America

46725 • Green, Laurie
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.110
(also listed as AFR 317D, AMS 315, HIS 317L)
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Description

This course explores the history of social movements for rights in twentieth-century America. Whether they used a language of equality, justice, freedom or liberation, an array of social groups in modern America forged struggles and organizations that advocated for recognition of their rights. And yet there was no unanimity about the meaning of rights; the course examines changing and often conflicting interpretations, focusing on Blacks, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, women, working-class people, and gay men and lesbians. Instead of isolating them from each other, we use both comparative and relational approaches to the history of these movements. We strive not only to make sense of similarities and differences, but how they influenced each other. It what ways, for instance, did the Civil Rights Movement of the early 1960s inspire the Women’s Liberation Movement? Such an approach can lead to surprises; in Austin, for example, African American and Mexican American attorneys filed suit for school desegregation on the same day. A goal is for students to get a sense of how historians approach their work, thus readings include original historical documents and memoirs in addition to scholarly analyzes. This is primarily a lecture course, but some classes are devoted to group projects.

 

Possible readings:

Selected historical documents and articles

Melba Pattillo Beals, Warriors Don’t Cry:  A Searing Memoir of the Battle to Integrate Little Rock’s Central High

Carlos Bulosan, American is in the Heart: A Personal History

Charles Denby, Indignant Heart: A Black Worker’s Journal

José Angel Gutiérrez, The Making of a Civil Rights Leader: José Angel Gutiérrez

Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name

Wilma Mankiller, Mankiller: A Chief and Her People

 

Requirements:

Midterm                                                                                                          25%

Final exam                                                                                                      35%

3 short quizzes on lecture terms (5% each)                                                  15%

1 500-word writing assignment on a selected reading (15%)                      15%

2 historical documents analyses (Submission grade, 5% each)                    10%

Attendance is required. Extra credit opportunities are available


WGS 301 • The United States And Africa

46730 • Falola, Oloruntoyin
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.126
(also listed as AFR 317C, HIS 317L)
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This class will look at the history of the political, economic and cultural relations between the United States and Africa from the early origins of the slave trade to the present. It explores the role of the US in historical global contexts. The class is intended to elucidate historical developments both in the US and on the African continent, and should satisfy students with a strong interest in US history as well as those interested in the place of the US in the African Diaspora.  The semester is divided into four parts, each covering a major theme.

Course Objectives

To develop a base of African and US history and increase the level of awareness of the African Diaspora in the US. 

Toobtain a well-rounded approach to the political, economic, and cultural connections between the United States and Africa.

To reevaluate perceptions of Africa, to recognize the vibrant nature of African culture, and to apply new knowledge to the different cultural agents active in US popular culture, such as music, dance, literature, business and science.

To help students understand present-day politics in Africa at a deeper level and to obtain a better understanding of racial conditions in the US.

To learn how to assess historical materials -- their relevance to a given interpretative problem, their reliability and their importance -- and to determine the biases present within particular scholarship. These include historical documents, literature and films.

 

1. Joseph E. Holloway, ed., Africanisms in American Culture  (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2005 second edition).

2. Curtis A. Keim, Mistaking Africa: Curiosities and Inventions of the American Mind (Westview Press, 1999).

3. Alusine Jalloh, ed., The United States and West Africa (Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, 2008).

4. Kevin Roberts, ed., The Atlantic World 1450-2000 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008).

5. Karen Bouwer, Gender and Decolonization in the Congo: the Legacy of Patrice Lumumba (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).

6. Gendering the African diaspora : women, culture, and historical change in the Caribbean and Nigerian hinterland / edited by Judith A. Byfield, LaRay Denzer, and Anthea Morrison. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2010.           

i. Public Lecture Review 10%    

ii. First  Examination 25%

iii. Book Review 20%

iv.   Book Review 20%

v. Second Examination 25%


WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

46765 • Spitzer-Hanks, Dorrel
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 303
(also listed as E 314V)
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E 314V  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

 

Instructor:  Spitzer-Hanks, T

Unique #:  35010

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  WGS 301

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  Recent cognitive research supports the suggestion, made by an earlier generation of scholars, that readers always take an active part in constructing the meaning of a text as they read it.  However, ‘readers’ exist in bodies that differ in terms of gender, class, and race.  In our class, we will ask how the active construction of meaning in a given text changes depending on the gender, class, and race of the reader and on the representations of gender, class, and race presented in a given text.  We will also explore how scholars and poets have answered the same question.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Ernest Hemingway: The Complete Short Stories; Adrienne Rich: Selected Poems 1952-2012; Angela Carter: Nights at the Circus.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  There will also be short quizzes and in-class writing assignments (30% of the final grade).


WGS 301 • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

46770 • Barajas, Courtney
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 3.116
(also listed as E 314V)
show description

E 314V  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

 

Instructor:  Sapio, J

Unique #:  35015

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  WGS 301

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course deconstructs the very notions upon which it is based: women, gender, literature, and culture.  We will explore what it means to identify as a woman and the rigidity and flexibility of constructions of gender.  In addition, we will investigate the role of literature in critiquing and reinforcing society’s representation of the female body, as well as traditional gender roles and gender stereotypes, and formulations of sexual identity.  Students will have the opportunity to delve deeply into rich texts and engage with contemporary cultural questions facing our society today.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home; Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, We Should All Be Feminists.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade).  There may also be short quizzes, exams, and in-class presentations assigned (30% of the final grade).


WGS 303 • Introduction To Lgbtq Studies

46775 • Nault, Curran
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.212
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This introductory course will provide basic skills in theory, history, and research methods relevant to LGBTQ studies. Beginning from the premise that sexual identity has a history rather than being a universal category, we will explore concepts of gender and sexuality, as well as related categories of race, class, religion, and nation. We will also briefly survey the making of modern understandings of sexual and LGBTQ identities in the last one hundred years and the implications of this history for broader understandings of gender and sexuality.


WGS 305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

46785 • Somers-Willett, Susan
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.112
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Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color. This course carries a cultural diversity flag.


WGS 305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

46780 • Heinzelman, Susan
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 2.128
show description

Women’s and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the relationships between sex, gender, society, and our own experiences as political acts. In this course, students will come to understand key differences between sex, gender, and sexuality; define feminism both broadly and personally, particularly in relationship to race, class, and other intersectional aspects of identity; learn about queer and trans histories and experiences; explore women’s experiences in international contexts; and investigate the body and its representation as a way to uncover gender norms and expectations. We will also discuss and write about recent social controversies (such as bathroom legislation, bias incidents, the exclusion of groups from the Women’s March on Washington) as moments that reveal and critique the cultural codes of gender. An emphasis will be placed on self-identified women, LGBTQA+ individuals, and people of color. This course carries a cultural diversity flag.


WGS 322 • Population And Society

46800 • Cavanagh, Shannon
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM CLA 0.112
(also listed as SOC 369K)
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Description

Population studies or demography is an interdisciplinary field, encompassing the study of the size, distribution, and composition of human populations, and the processes of fertility, mortality, and migration through which populations’ change. These processes are closely connected to many of the pressing problems facing contemporary societies. For instance, the funding of health care in developed countries is a major issue because of declining fertility and population aging. Civil unrest in parts of Africa and the Middle East are, in part, a function of persistently high fertility rates. These processes are also important drivers of many contemporary environmental problems. Finally, a grasp of population processes is important for a deeper understanding of the population explosion in urban areas and the higher transmission and impact of AIDS in the developing world. 

This course provides an overview of the field of population studies. A sociological approach is emphasized, but economic, geographic, anthropological, and biological perspectives will also be used. Attention will be given to a) the demographic concepts needed to objectively evaluate population issues and b) the substantive content of the population issues. Emphasis will be given to evaluating the evidence regarding debates on population topics. 

Reading Materials 

Required text: Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues, 10th edition, John R. Weeks. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co. ISBN-10: 0495096377 

On-line Readings: There are a number of short reading assignments, marked with an [EL]. These readings can be found in External Links section of the class Blackboard site and should be read prior to class period. 

Grading and Requirement:

You are expected to complete all readings for the day's class before coming to class. Read as actively as possible. Class time will be an opportunity to discuss and further explore the readings, so it is essential that everyone comes prepared to participate. Our class periods will be more productive and enjoyable when we all begin with the same materials. 

There will be TWO examinations during the semester, each worth 20% of your final grade. The exams will draw from both readings and class discussions. The exams are not cumulative. Each will include multiple choice and short answer questions. Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand. All make-up examinations are 100% essay. 

You must also complete TWO assignments and ONE short paper during the semester. The assignments—on mortality and fertility—are designed to familiarize you with demographic data on the web, give you an overview of your country of choice, and help you identify your country’s population angle that most interests you and that you will explore in more detail in the short paper. Each assignment is worth 15% of your final grade. The short paper is worth 25% of your grade. 

The final 5% of your grade is based on attendance/class participation. I expect you to show up and engage (i.e., not text, sleep, or read the newspaper) with classmates, the TA, and me in the cl


WGS 322 • Race/Gender/Surveillance

46810 • Browne, Simone
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)
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Drawing from social science readings, science fiction (Gattaca, THX-1138, Ex-Machina, Grounded), documentaries, and popular media (24, South Park, Orange is the New Black, The Bachelor, Cheaters), this course introduces students to the emerging field of Surveillance Studies.

We examine: slavery, reality TV, sports, Google, trolling + social media, borders, airports, biometric technology, whistleblowers, drones, wearables + fashion, among other topics.

Assignments: Film Review, In-class Quizzes, Current Event Analysis, Take-Home Final Exam, and Research Teams produce a digital magazine on “Surveillance”. This course is cross-listed with Women and Gender Studies, and Sociology. Cultural Diversity Flag. Ethics and Leadership Flag.


WGS 322 • Sociology Of Gender

46799 • Williams, Christine
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM UTC 3.104
(also listed as SOC 333K)
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Descripton:

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender in U.S. society.  The central themes of the course are: historical changes in gender beliefs and practices; socialization practices that reproduce gender identities; how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape the experience of gender; and the relationship between gender, power, and social inequality. 

Reading: 

Students are required to attend all lectures and complete all reading assignments on time.  The course requires reading approximately 75-100 pages per week.

Grading:

Grades are based on 3 essay examinations and 4-5 written homework assignments.  Computers are not permitted in this class. 


WGS 322 • Sociology Of Race And Work

46805 • Bhalodia-Dhanani, Aarti
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GEA 127
(also listed as AAS 330, SOC 321R)
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Flag: Cultural Diversity in US

Course Description
Work is a central activity in the lives of most people. Along with providing an income, the type of work one does shapes the worker’s sense of personal identity. Social interaction in the work place provides workers with a set of skills, values, and mindset that influences how the work is done. Structure of a society determines the kind of work it does, who does what type of work, and how much people are paid for their efforts. In United States, individuals’ racial and gender characteristics deeply shape how labor markets emerge and how skills are evaluated. Jobs are often gender segregated and men and women are remunerated differently. This course is a critical examination of work through a gendered and racial lens. The purpose of this course is to examine concepts such as labor markets, globalization, racial segregation, and gendering of the work place. This course is cross-listed with Asian American Studies and Women’s Studies.
 
Course Objectives
Students will be able to sociologically identify concepts such as global markets, transnational labor, care work, service industry, gendered work, and racial segregation in the work place.  A majority of the readings, films, and class meetings will focus on contemporary work environment. Students will examine workers in the retail industry, care workers such as nannies, maids, and nurses, transnational workers in the STEM fields, and migrant labor. We will start the class with a survey of different forms of labor throughout United States’ history.  Students will be able to make historical connections between American citizenship, work, and value of one’s labor.

Readings
Selected chapters from the following:

Skhlar. Judith. American Citizenship: The Quest for Inclusion. Harvard University Press. Any Edition.
 
Lowe, Lisa. Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics. Duke University Press. 1996.

Wharton, Amy edited. Working in America: Continuity, Conflict, and Change in a New Economic Era. Routledge. 2016.
 
Ngai, Mae. Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America. Princeton University Press. 2004.
 
Wright, Melissa. Disposable Women and Other Myths of Global Capitalism. Taylor and Francis. 2013.
 
Thistle, Susan. From Marriage to the Market: The Transformation of Women’s Lives and Work. University of California Press. 2006.
 
Assignments and Grading
Attendance and participation: 20%
Two Essays: 40% (2x20)
Two Exams: 40% (2x20)


WGS 335 • African Queer Studies

46840 • Livermon, Xavier
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 0.104
(also listed as AFR 372G)
show description

Description:

This course explores queer gender and sexuality in Africa, with particular focus on theoretical issues, the colonial encounter, citizenship and activism, media representations. In the first unit, we will examine some of the theoretical issues that are relevant to studying queer gender and sexuality in Africa and in the African Diaspora more broadly. In the second unit, we will explore some of the literature on the impact of colonialism on queer African identities and practices, and we will pay particular attention to its lasting impact on queer African lives in our post-colonial moment. In the third unity, we will read several ethnographic and literary texts on specific communities in order to expand our understanding of the diverse ways in which queer Africans create identities, experience desire, and redefine dominant notions of citizenships. In the final unit of the course, we will examine representations of queer African sexuality in literature, film, and media, focusing especially on representation in relation to recent events in South Africa, Uganda, Malawi, and Senegal. We will pay particular attention to how such representations are shaped by political economy and influenced by the international community.

 

Texts:

Queer African Reader Sokari Ekine and Hakima Abbas eds.

African Sexualities: A reader Sylvia Tamale ed.

Heterosexual Africa?: The History of an Idea from the Age of Exploration to the Age of AIDS Marc Epprecht

OUT in Africa: LGBT Organizing in Namibia and South Africa Ashley Currier

Allah Made Us: Sexual Outlaws in an Islamic African City Rudolf P. Gaudio

Black Bull, Ancestors, and Me: My life as a Lesbian Sangoma Nkunzi Zandile Nkadinde

  

Grading:

Attendance: 10%

Participation: 10%

Response Papers: 20%

Midterm: 20%

Final: 40% 


WGS 335 • Confronting Lgbtq Oppression

46835 • Hogan, Kristen
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM SZB 284
(also listed as S W 360K, T D 357T)
show description

Confronting LGBTQA+ Oppression, Part I of the Peers for Pride Program

Flags: Cultural Diversity in the US

Course Time: Wednesdays 3p-6p

Become a part of Peers for Pride and teach performance-based workshops on intersectional LGBTQA+ justice! This fall course is the first half of the Peers for Pride Program of the Gender and Sexuality Center, supported by the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies. The course prepares students to become peer facilitators of performance-based workshops for LGBTQA+ justice, including racial and gender justice. This semester we build a foundational knowledge of LGBTQA+ identities, the intersectional systems of oppression that affect LGBTQA+ people, and approaches to our core question: “What do thriving LGBTQA+/queer communities look like?” We are also working together to establish our practice of theatre for dialogue, a form of applied theatre in preparation for your facilitation in the spring. This semester you will establish your relationship with each other as an ensemble, you will reflect on your role in collaborative facilitation, and you will work together to propose activating and message scenes to engage audiences in the spring in conversation around LGBTQA+ justice. This semester, you will build skills in intersectional analysis of texts, events, and daily life; ensemble performance work; community alliances; and critical reflection in writing, speaking, and performance.

Sign up for the course to be invited to apply, or apply now here: http://tinyurl.com/GSCPfP1718


WGS 340 • Contemp African Pop Culture

46845 • Livermon, Xavier
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A207A
(also listed as AFR 372G, ANT 324L)
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The aim of this course is to introduce students to some of the most significant aspects of popular culture in contemporary sub-Saharan Africa. Manifestations of popular culture are considered as markers of modern African identities, embedded in complex and varied socio-cultural, historical and political contexts. Within the current era of global, diasporic, and transnational flows, it is neither sufficient any longer to view Africa solely from the perspective of political economies, nor to discuss contemporary African culture within the tradition-versus-modernity debate. Manifestations of popular culture in Africa show that the continent is part and parcel of the postmodern world, with cultural production simultaneously influenced by global trends and specific African contexts. The course will cover various forms of cultural expression and genres, including popular film, music, literature, dance, comics and cartoons, fashion, sport, street art, theatre, and contemporary visual arts. Attention will be paid to the production modes, audiences and sites of consumption of these different genres and aspects of popular culture. Course instruction will include extensive film and clip viewings, analysis of music, and reading fictional texts such as popular novels and comics.

Texts:

  • Marguerite Abouet Aya: Life in Yop City.
  • Nadine Dolby: Constructing Race: Youth, Identity and Popular Culture in South Africa.
  • Manthia Diawara In Search of Africa.
  • Sokari Ekine ed. SMS Uprising: Mobile Activism in Africa. 
  • Relebohile Moletsane, Claudia Mitchell, and Ann Smith eds. Was it Something I Wore? Dress, Identity, Materialitiy.
  • Mwenda Ntarangwi East African Hip-Hop: Youth Culture and Globalization.
  • Simon Weller and Garth Walker South African Township Barbershops and Salons.

Grading breakdown (percentages):

  • Attendance and Participation 20%
  • Response Papers 20%
  • Midterm 20%
  • Final 40%

WGS 340 • Graf/Pstr Art: Islam World

46900 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A218A
(also listed as ANT 324L, ISL 373, MEL 321, MES 342, R S 358)
show description

Too many portrayals of Islamic societies are treated as superficially as the issues involving the hijab and veiling. Among the hip and the fashionable, the religious fronts and political systems in contemporary Muslim societies (particularly in the Middle East and North Africa), a complex and complicated phenomenon has been developing for decades:  the “art of the wall,” namely, graffiti and poster art.

Poster art and graffiti are employed by various groups within the Islamic world to project their ideas through the mediums of photography, video, the film of documentary makers, the paint and ink of professionals, anonymous or amateur designers and artists to record the political and social events within urban areas. Such visual records depicting aspects of everyday life give voice to the people living and working within the Muslim world. An observer can see acts of rebellion as the anonymous young population in Muslim societies experiments with ways to test the limits of freedom. This is done with creativity and often with courage, which may cause concern to the political systems ruling over people whose freedom of speech and action are limited.

In this course, the students are introduced to a common and general principle of Islam, followed by a study of differences in culture and linguistic background of the people in lands of a Muslim majority. The major part of the semester is devoted to analysis and studying graffiti and poster art as it relates to social and political events unfolding. It is expected that the students become interested and learn that the interpretation of today’s Muslim youth through popular culture, expressed in the art and work of talented people manifesting their identities and personal expression about the world around them, provides a valuable access to learning and getting closer to the cultures that may seem strange, illogical, or somewhat hostile to the principles of “Western democracy.” This is an opportunity for us to look at the body and soul of people of ancient civilizations and of a recent troubled history with high hopes for a bright future from the perspective of those from the inside looking out.

 


WGS 340 • Gwendolyn Brooks

46860 • Jones, Omi
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM ETC 2.132
(also listed as AFR 372E, E 349S, T D 357T)
show description

Description:

In this course, students will study the prose and poetry of Gwendolyn Brooks, giving particular attention to her novel, Maud Martha.  Students will analyze texts, develop performance scripts, create criticism, and present readings centered around the work of Gwendolyn Brooks.  Emphasis will be placed on Black Feminist staging strategies, the role of Chamber Theatre in the development of Black art, and the position of Gwendolyn Brooks in the literary world. 

 

Readings:

Brooks, Gwendolyn.  Maud Martha.  Chicago:  Third World Press, 1993.

Brooks, Gwendolyn.  “The Rise of Maud Martha,” in Invented Lives: The Narratives of Black Women, 1860-1960, Mary Helen Washington.  Garden City, NY:  Anchor Press, 1987.

Brooks, Gwendolyn.  The World of Gwendolyn Brooks. New York:  Harper and Row, 1971.

Christian, Barbara.  “Nuance and the Novella: A Study of Gwendolyn Brooks's Maud Martha,” in A Life Distilled: Gwendolyn Brooks, Her Poetry and Fiction, eds. Maria K. Mootry and Gary Smith, 1987, pp. 239–253.

Washington, Mary Helen.  “‘Taming All That Anger Down’: Rage and Silence in Gwendolyn

Brooks's Maud Martha,” Massachusetts Review 24 (Summer 1983): 453–466.

 

Grading:

Analysis of Maud Martha                                           15 pts.

Comparative Analysis of Two Brooks Poems 15 pts.

Solo Performance of Brooks Chapter                         15 pts.

Chamber Theatre Script                                               10 pts.

Chamber Theatre Production                                       25 pts.

Attendance at Black Studies Performance                   5 pts.

2-Minute in-class essays                                             5 pts.

Class Participation                                                       10 pts.


WGS 340 • Holocaust Aftereffects

46895 • Bos, Pascale
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 234
(also listed as C L 323, J S 365, LAH 350)
show description

The events of the Holocaust changed Western culture in fundamental ways. Not only was a great part of Jewish culture in Europe destroyed, the circumstances of the Nazi genocide as a modern, highly rationalized, efficient form of mass murder which took place in the heart of civilized Europe changed the conception of the progress of modernity and the Enlightenment in fundamental ways. This course explores the historical, political, psychological, theological, and cultural fall-out, as well as literary and cinematic responses in Europe and the U.S. to these events as they first became known, and as one moved further away from it in time and came to understand its pronounced and often problematic after effects. Central to our inquiry is the realization that the events of the Holocaust have left indelible traces in European and U.S. culture and culture production, of which a closer look (first decade by decade, then moving on to a number of themes and questions), reveals profound insights into current day culture, politics, and society.

Required Texts: 

Levi and Rothberg, The Holocaust: Theoretical Readings; Art Spiegelman, Maus I ⅈ Ruth Klüger, Still Alive: a Girlhood Remembered; Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz;  Elie Wiesel, Night; Additional  course packet

Films: Nuit et Brouillard; Holocaust (excerpts); Shoah (excerpts); Schindler's List (excerpt)

Grading Policy

Attendance/participation 15%

Response papers (2) 10%

Class presentation 10%

Presentation paper 15%

Midterm exam 20%

Final research paper 30% (proposal, bibliography, outline + 1st, 5% each, paper: 15%)

 

 


WGS 340 • Islamic Law

46880 • Ayoub, Samy
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 201
(also listed as ISL 340, MEL 321, MES 342, R S 358)
show description

This course will serve as a survey of central aspects of Islamic law from its origins to modern times. It introduces students to several classical Islamic legal texts in translation and devotes special attention to topics in Muslim devotional, family, and criminal law. We conclude with an investigation of the modern topics of personal status laws and the relevance of Islamic law today in the American context. Some knowledge of Islam is expected of students enrolling in this class, although there are no specific course requirements.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Wael Hallaq, An Introduction to Islamic Law, Cambridge University Press (2009) All additional required readings will be available on CANVAS. SUPPLEMENTARY READINGS:
  • Crime and Punishment in Islamic Law, Rudolph Peters Distinguished Jurist’s Primer, Ibn Rushd (in translation) Islamic Law and Finance, Frank Vogel and Samuel Hayes Islam and Colonialism, Rudolph Peters
  • Jihad in Classical and Modern Islam, Rudolph Peters

GRADING:

  • Response Papers 30%
  • Midterm Test 20%
  • Class participation 20%
  • Final Exam 30%

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Upon completing this course you should be better equipped than before to:

  • Sketch an outline of Islamic legal history
  • Articulate the basic sources, tensions, transformation of Islamic legal thought and practice
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the great variety of Islamic legal reasoning and its practical expressions 

WGS 340 • Ital Renaissance, 1350-1550

46865 • Frazier, Alison
Meets MW 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 1.126
(also listed as EUS 346, HIS 343G, R S 357)
show description

This upper-division course combines lecture, group work, and discussion to introduce the political, social, economic, and cultural phenomena that made the Italian peninsula such a lively place between 1350 and 1550. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources, we examine cultural production in many realms of human experience, emphasizing the ethical questions that individuals faced.


This course aims to teach the analysis of historical evidence. By semester’s end, you will have read some of the most influential and controversial works from this period. You will be able to put them in historical context, to describe how historians use them, and to explain why they remain compelling today. 

This course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject, but students are presumed to be capable of critical reflection upon both lectures and readings.
THIS COURSE CARRIES A GLOBAL CULTURES FLAG AND AN ETHICS FLAG.

Readings may include:

Boccaccio, Decameron, selections

Petrarch, selected letters Alberti, excerpts from On the FamilyMachiavelli, Mandragola Castiglione, The Courtier, selectionsVasari, Lives of the Artists, selections

Quizzes and in-class writing
Reading worksheets 
Two essay exams


WGS 340 • Muslim Women In Politics

46890 • Shirazi, Faegheh
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CLA 1.102
(also listed as ANT 324L, ISL 372, R S 358)
show description

There has been a religious resurgence since the 1970s, and Islam has come to play a significant role in the world. Despite the restrictions placed on women by the religious authorities, the most unexpected effect of this religious renaissance is the overwhelming political participation of many Muslim women at different levels in their respective cultures. While a large number of Muslim women are winning elections in many countries, in general, women’s rights are still an issue in the Muslim world. Since the beginning of recorded Islamic history, Muslim women with political influence have held political offices and positions of leadership. At the same time, we know that in some Muslim nations the rights of women are limited, and their participation as public servants is almost impossible. In both of these cases, Islam is given as the key rationale for participation or lack of participation of women in their society. Both Quranic and hadith commentators vary as to whether women’s political participation is a correct interpretation of religious imperatives.

 

Debate about the religious legitimacy of Muslim women and their participation in politics are the themes of this course. We will study and discuss the historical developments and debates about both religious and cultural perspectives that affect the role of Muslim women in politics. We will study important Muslim women who have held or hold important political positions or influential positions in NGOs or as political activists and grassroot leaders. In addition, we also will study issues on gender, ethnicity, culture, and faith that impact Muslim women’s political participation and how Muslim women constitute themselves as social and political actors as a result of their interactions within the structural frameworks and political cultures. 


WGS 340 • Women/Resistnc Contemp E Euro

46870 • Lutsyshyna, Oksana
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GEA 127
(also listed as EUS 347, REE 325)
show description

Course description:

This course will examine works of a number of Eastern European women writers, such as Olga Tokarczuk (Poland), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus), Oksana Zabuzhko (Ukraine), Dubravka Ugresic (Croatia), Herta Muller (Romania – Germany), Sofi Oksanen (Finland), and Ludmila Petrushevskaya (Russia), and trace their role and involvement in resisting not only political regimes but also gender-based oppression. We will also read supplemental articles, interviews, and secondary sources to provide a general understanding of contemporary politics and ethnic conflict as well as gender roles in Eastern Europe. Through class discussion, students will discuss the many forms and repercussions of women's resistance to recent issues and events within this strategic region. 

Readings:

  • Muller, Herta. The Land of Green Plums. Transl. Michael Hofmann. Picador, 2010. ISBN-10: 0312429940
  • Alexievich, Svetlana. Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear 
  • Disaster. Trans. Keith Gessen. Picador, 2006. ISBN-10: 0312425848.
  • Oksanen, Sofi. Purge. Trans. Lola Rogers. Grove Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 0802170773.
  • Petrushevskaya, Ludmila. There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill Her Neighbor’s Baby: Scary Fairy Tales. Trans. Keith Gessen. Penguin, 2009. ISBN-10: 0143114662.
  • Tokarczuk, Olga. Primeval and Other Times. Trans. Antonia Lloyd-Jones. Twisted Spoon Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 8086264351.
  • Ugresic, Dubravka. The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays. Penn State UP, 1998. ISBN-10: 027101847X.
  • Ugresic, Dubravka. Thank You for Not Reading. Dalkey Archive Press, 2003. ISBN-10: 1564782980
  • Zabuzhko, Oksana. Fieldwork in Ukrainian Sex. Trans. Halyna Hryn. AmazonCrossingEnglish, 2011. ISBN-10:1611090083.

Grading:

Journals, 1-2 page long, on authors of choice (4): 20 %

To in-class exams: 20 %

Final paper (may be based on one of the journals): 30 %

Presentation: 20%

Participation:10%­


WGS 345 • American Dilemmas

46945 • Green, Penny
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM CLA 1.108
(also listed as SOC 336C, URB 354)
show description

Description:  

This course examines critical American social problems that threaten the very fabric of our collective life as a nation.  These include problems in the economy and political system, social class and income inequality, racial/ethnic inequality, gender inequality and heterosexism, problems in education, and problems of illness and health care.  The course has three main objectives.  One involves providing students with the theoretical and methodological tools needed to critically analyze these problems from a sociological perspective.  A second involves providing students with current data and other information documenting the seriousness of these problems.  The final objective focuses on evaluating social policies addressing these problems (e.g., welfare-to-work programs, pay equity legislation), with special reference to questions of social justice, the common good, as well as public and individual responsibility.  Class format will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, with a strong emphasis upon the latter. 

Required Readings: 

A packet of readings to be purchased from Austin Text Books at 2116 Guadalupe (i.e., the Drag)

Additional readings will be made available on Blackboard

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and punctuality are expected.  You’re allowed three absences without penalty during the semester (excluding our introductory class meeting).  The nonpenalized absences are intended to cover such situations as illness, family emergencies, university sponsored trips, etc.  Students who miss more than three classes, regardless of the reason, will have their semester grades reduced by one full percentage points for each absence beyond the three allowed.  The one exception to this policy concerns absences for religious reasons, assuming advance, written notification is given.

Tentative Grading Policy:

Four Short Papers (2-3 pages)            65%

Class Participation                              20%

Pop Quizzes                                        15%

 


WGS 345 • Animals/American Culture

46955 • Davis, Janet
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BUR 436A
(also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R)
show description

Description

                  A wandering pig played a central role in creating a bicameral legislature in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1644.  According to John Winthrop, the colony’s first governor, “There fell out a great business upon a very small occasion”:  a poor widow and a wealthy merchant went to the General Court regarding the disputed ownership of a stray sow.  Although popular sympathies rested with the widow, the Court ruled in favor of the merchant, thus prompting the Court’s assistants and deputies to divide formally into two distinct legislative houses in order to make the colony’s government more representative. This is but one example of the central—if hitherto unrecognized—role that animals have played in shaping  the course of American history. This interdisciplinary upper-division undergraduate seminar explores the place of animals in the social, cultural, economic, and political life of the United States. Topics of discussion include animals in entertainment; hunting; vegetarianism; changing cultural attitudes about nature; wandering animals and property rights;  animals and evolutionary theory; the rise of the animal welfare and animal rights movements;  laboring animals and the nation’s move to a motorized economy; animals and war; the growth of pet keeping as a cultural practice and big business; factory farms; the rise of veterinary science; zoos; and more. Please note: This course contains a Service Learning Component. You will complete your Service Learning hours at one of three locations: The Austin Animal Center; Travis County Audubon; or The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. If you do not have access to transportation, there will be Service Learning opportunities on campus.

                 

Requirements

Discussion:  20%

Service Learning Journal: 20%

Service Learning Research Paper: 30%

Final Take-Home Essay Exam: 30%

 

Possible Texts

Anna Sewell, Black Beauty

Nigel Rothfels, ed., Representing Animals

Susan Jones, Valuing Animals: Veterinarians and Their Patients in Modern America

Peter Singer, Animal Liberation

Laura Hillenbrandt, Seabiscuit: An American Legend

Gregg Mitman, Reel Nature: America’s Romance with Wildlife on Film

 


WGS 345 • Gender/Pol In A Comp Persp

46905 • Holmsten, Stephanie
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 420
(also listed as GOV 365N)
show description

GOV 365N/WGS 345 Gender and Politics in Comparative Perspective

#38790/46905 T/Th 12:30 – 2

 

While women's representation in politics has improved in recent years, the representation of women, and particularly minority women, still lags behind the representation of men in political institutions. This course will study the patterns of women's representation over time, and in different regions of the world. We will consider what explains the difference between women's and men's representation, as well as variation in the election of women across country cases. We will ask why is it important to have gender equality in political institutions, tracing the evolution of feminism over time. We will then consider historical and cultural obstacles to women' representation. Tackling a few country case studies, we will also learned about institutional responses to women's representation, and ways that electoral rules can affect women's representation.  Finally, we will ask whether women behave any differently than men once elected.  To what extent do women affect policies and how? Throughout the course we will also keep in mind other forms of social division, particularly religion and ethnicity, and the interaction of various forms of identity with gender.

 

The course grade will be based on team-based assignments that propose policy solutions to real-life challenges, individual writing assignments, and two exams. 

 

Required Texts: 

Paxton, Pam and Melanie Hughes. 2016.  Women, Politics and Power: A Global Perspective. 3rd Ed. Washington, DC: CQ Press.

 

Adichie, Chamamanda. 2015. We Should all be Feminists. New York: Anchor Books.


WGS 345 • Language And Gender

46940 • Kimball, Sara
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.210
(also listed as E 364S)
show description

E 364S  l  Language and Gender

 

Instructor:  Kimball, S

Unique #:  35660

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  Who talks more, men or women?  Who interrupts more often?  Which sex uses more proper speech?  How do people signal social attitudes in choosing pronouns to refer to mixed-sex groups?  How are gender and sexual orientation constructed in linguistic interaction.  For thirty years, sex- and gender-related differences in language and communicative styles have been increasingly examined in linguistic studies.  Such research indicates that the answers to these questions are more complicated than you might expect.  In this course, we will examine some of the research that show how social expectations and power structures intersect to influence the speech women and men use in particular social situations.  We will also look at and discuss current research on how people use language to construct social gender and at how historical, economic, and social situations have shaped the language women and men use.

 

Texts:  Mary Talbot, Language and Gender (2nd ed.)

 

Readings Packet, possibly to include selections from:

 

  • Bergvall, Victoria L., Janet M. Bing, and Alice F. Freed eds., Rethinking Language and Gender Research. New York: Longman, 1996.
  • Mary Bucholtz, A.C. Lang, and Laurel A. Sutton, eds., Reinventing Identities. The Gendered Self in Discourse. Oxford/New York. Oxford University Press. 1999.
  • Hall, Kira and Mary Bucholtz, eds., Gender Articulated: Language and the Socially Constructed Self. New York: Routledge. 1995.
  • Johnson, Sally and Ulrike Hanna Meinhof, eds., Language and Masculinity. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. 1997.

Roman, Camille, Suzanne Juhasz, and Cristine Miller, eds., The Women and Language Debate, A Sourcebook. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1994.

 

Requirements & Grading:  Three short (ca. 5-pages with drafts) papers related to the readings (30% each); Participation in class discussion, occasional informal writing assignments, (10%).

 

Class attendance is mandatory: If you accumulate more than four (4) unexcused absences your final grade will be lowered.


WGS 345 • Mod Wmn In Arts Cent Europe

46912 • Forbes, Meghan
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GEA 127
(also listed as EUS 347, REE 325)
show description

Description:

The well-known avant-garde movements of the early Twentieth Century, such as Futurism, Dadaism, Surrealism, and Constructivism, are often defined by their rejection of conservative politics and canonized art. And yet, members of these avant-gardes, actively participating in conversations about the social implications of art-making and poetry in revolutionary times, were radical in their vision to a limit. The vast majority of avant-gardists most famous today are men; women were largely excluded from the avant-garde movements, or relegated to less visible roles, and writings about the period have largely perpetuated this marginalization ever since, despite the important contributions of various female artists and writers at the time. In this course, we will focus primarily on the life and work of the Central European artists, writers, and editors Hannah Höch, Lucia Moholy, Toyen, and Teresa ?arnowerówna, but also consider concurrent figures to the East and West, such as Claude Cahun, Gertrude Stein, Zora Neale Hurston, and Marina Tsvetaeva. We will look at and read works by these figures, and also discuss the explicit and implicit modes by which their production has been marginalized. The role of fluid gender identity, sexual orientation, as well as national, racial, and religious affiliation will also be discussed.

 

Selected Readings:

  • Butler, Judith. Undoing Gender. New York: Routledge, 2004.
  • Caws, Mary Ann, Rudolf E. Kuenzli, and Gwen Raaberg, eds. Surrealism and Women. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1991.

 

Course Requirements:

Students will be evaluated (in equal thirds) on

1) participation, as defined by regular attendance and active engagement in class discussion;

2) brief reading responses and an in-class presentation; and

3) a final research paper of 10-12 pages, with rough drafts submitted for revision three times throughout the semester.


WGS 345 • Toni Morrison

46965 • Woodard, Helena
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 204
(also listed as AFR 372E, E 349S)
show description

E 349S  l  5-Toni Morrison

 

Instructor:  Woodard, H

Unique #:  35585

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  AFR 372E; WGS 345

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course examines select novels by Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, Toni Morrison.  The novels thematize womanism as theory, which incorporates race, gender, and culture in experiences uniquely shared by women--particularly women of color--across class and regional boundaries.  Collectively, Morrison's characters confront a wide range of challenging crises:  infanticide, male-female relations, familial conflict, socio-economical, cultural survival, etc.  Morrison's novels are a gloss on the African-American literary tradition, deeply rooted in the American literary tradition.

 

Required Reading (subject to change):  The Bluest Eye, 1970; Sula, 1973; Song of Solomon, 1977; Beloved, 1987; Jazz, 1992; A Mercy, 2008; God Help the Child.

 

Audio-Visual Aids:  Toni Morrison with Bill Moyers, History of Ideas Series; Toni Morrison on Beloved; Jazz and the Harlem Renaissance; Toni Morrison on Oprah Winfrey (Song of Solomon); The Margaret Garner Opera (documentary).

 

Requirements & Grading:  .50 Two Critical essays TBA (5 pages each; typed, ds); .30 A Reading Notebook (12-page minimum; typed, ds; see separate instruction sheet); .20 Presentations (TBA) / quizzes / class participation.

 

ATTENDANCE:  Regular attendance is required.  More than four absences will be sufficient grounds for failure in the course. Penalties may range from a reduction in overall course grade to failure of the course itself.  I reserve the right to make decisions on a case-by-case basis.  The four allowed absences will include illness, deaths of relatives, and other emergencies.  If you are more than five minutes late or leave before class ends (without permission), you will be counted absent for that class.  You are responsible for all work covered in your absence.  Read each novel completely by the first day of discussion for that book.  No makeup for quizzes is permitted.  Course pack articles are required reading.

 

GRADING SCALE:  Final grades will be determined on the basis of the following rubric.  Please note that to ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage.  Thus, a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999.  The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

 

A (94-100); A- (90-93); B+ (87-89); B (84-86); B- (80-83); C+ (77-79); C (74-76); C- (70-73); D+ (67-69); D (64-66); D- (60-63); F (0-59).

 

Plus/minus grades will be assigned for the final grade.  This is a writing-intensive course.  No final exam is given.


WGS 345 • Women Hist Polit Thought

46925 • Stauffer, Dana
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122
(also listed as CTI 335, GOV 335M)
show description

Course Description: Women in the History of Political Thought

This course will examine the themes of women, the family, and the private sphere in the history of political theory. We will analyze and interpret works of political theory in which women have a central role, and we will seek to understand the relationship between political thinkers’ views about women and the family and their larger political theories. We will begin in classical Greece with political theory and drama. Then we will move through history, considering the critiques of paternalism launched by Hobbes and Locke and the portrait of the ideal woman advanced by Rousseau in Book V of the Emile. In the second half of the course, we will consider the development of early feminism in the writings of Mary Wollstonecraft, Henrik Ibsen, John Stuart Mill, and Simone de Beauvoir. Some of the questions we will pursue are the following: What does justice demand in the realm of the relations between the sexes, and what kinds of social and political arrangements are best for women? How do our answers to these questions intersect with broader questions about human nature, identity, political community, and justice?

 

Required Texts

 

A Course Reader

 

De Beauvoir, Simone. The Second Sex. (Vintage)

 

Euripides II. (Complete Greek Tragedies, Chicago)

 

Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. Herland. (Penguin Classics)

 

Ibsen, Henrik. A Doll’s House and Other Plays. (Penguin Classics)

 

Mill, John Stuart. The Subjection of Women. Edited by Susan M. Okin (Hackett)

 

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Emile, or On Education. Translated by Allan Bloom. (Basic Books)

 

Wollstonecraft, Mary. A Vindication of the Rights of Women. (Prometheus)

 

Course Requirements and Grading

 

First Exam: 30%

Second Exam: 30%

Paper: 30%

Class Participation (including pop quizzes): 10%


WGS 345 • Women In Captivity

46920 • Henkel, Jacqueline
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 304
(also listed as E 370W)
show description

E 370W  l  Women in Captivity

 

Instructor:  Henkel, J

Unique #:  35695

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  WGS 345

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  In this course we will read captivity narratives by and about women. We will begin with an early American best-seller, a 17th century Puritan woman's account of her captivity among the Native Americans of New England.  Later in the course we will read (or view) examples of this particularly American genre as it recurs in later autobiography, fiction, and film.  We will read these narratives not just for the remarkable personal experiences they depict, but also for the cultural values, concerns, and anxieties they encode, particularly as these relate to experiences and outcomes imagined as possible for women.

 

Texts: (tentative list):  Michel Rene Hilliard d’Auberteuil, Miss McCrea: A Novel of the American Revolution (on-line) • Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola, ed., Women’s Indian Captivity Narratives • Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl • Deborah Larsen, The White • Toni Morrison, A Mercy • Susannah Haswell Rowson, Slaves in Algiers: Struggle for Freedom • Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie • Monica Sone, Nisei Daughter • other on-line readings (Angela Carter, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie); secondary readings on-line (Axtell, Ebersole, Namias, etc.) • Film excerpts in class: Last of the Mohicans, Dances with Wolves, etc. • Films: Come See the Paradise, Not Without My Daughter (required to view outside of class)

 

Requirements & Grading:  Minimum requirements are: 1) satisfactory work on quizzes (20%); 2) a passing average score on exams (two; no exam may be missed) (20% each; 40% total); 3) minor written and oral exercises, most to be completed in class (10%); 4) a course paper of 5-6 pages, in two drafts (20%); and 5) an abstract of 1-2 pages and (depending on class size) an oral presentation on secondary material (10%).

 

Attendance, class preparation, informed discussion, and courteous classroom behavior are considered essential, and unsatisfactory marks in these areas are deducted from the final average.  Final grades include "plus" or "minus" grades.


WGS 345 • Women In Postwar America

46950 • Green, Laurie
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 0.128
(also listed as AMS 370, HIS 350R)
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This course intensively examines U.S. women's history between World War II and the 1970s. In doing so, it also explores popular perceptions of womanhood, manhood and sexuality that became central to the cultural politics and social conflicts of the postwar period. By weaving together these topics – women’s history, popular culture, and postwar social movements – we raise fresh questions about well-known episodes of U.S. history. Why, for example, do most Americans remember Rosa Parks only as a demure seamstress who initiated the Montgomery Bus Boycott because she was too tired to give up her seat to a white? If every young woman hoped to be like Donna Reed or June Cleaver in the fifties, then where did the sixties movements come from? We also explore how various groups (e.g., suburban girls, working-class women, civil rights activists, immigrants, and others) negotiated ideas of family, work and sexuality. In doing so, we examine roots of issues that continue to have political purchase today, such as reproductive rights, sexuality, job equity, welfare, race, and ethnicity.

Course Activities:This is primarily a discussion seminar, but class will occasionally include short lectures and films. Readings include historical documents, memoirs, scholarly articles and full-length historical studies. The course has a writing flag, and is designed to help you develop skills in historical writing and analysis. Students will write regularly to encourage critical thinking and class discussion of readings. Graded assignments include weekly reading summaries, a short media research paper based on popular magazines of the postwar era; and a “Postwar Women’s Memoir Project” based on interviews with women who came of age between World War II and the 1970s.

* Bailey, Beth. Sex in the Heartland

* Douglas, Susan J. Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media

* Gilmore, Stephanie, ed. Feminist Coalitions: Historical Perspectives on Second-Wave Feminism in the United States

* Grace, Nancy M. and Ronna C. Johnson, eds., Breaking the Rule of Cool: Interviewing and Reading Women Beat Writers

* Lee, Chana Kai. For Freedom’s Sake: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer

* Meyerowitz, Joanne, ed. Not June Cleaver: Women and Gender in Postwar America, 1945-1960 (noted as NJC on syllabus)

* Santiago, Esmeralda. Almost a Woman

* Shakur, Assata. Assata: An Autobiography

10% Attendance, promptness, class participation

30% 350-word weekly analyses of readings (6 essays, 5% each)

20% Media research essay, 5 pages

35% Final Postwar Women’s Memoir Project essay, 8-10 pages

5%  Group Presentation on Memoir Projects


WGS 345 • Women In Sickness & Health

46935 • Seaholm, Megan
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 0.120
(also listed as HIS 350R)
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In this seminar students will explore the experience of American women, in sickness and in health.  Students will learn about medical and biological views of woman and women’s health, the social context of those views, the development of medical practices and, indeed, a new medical specialty, for the treatment of illness and debility. This study of American women focuses on the 19th and 20th century and looks at the experience of Native-American women, African-American women, Latinas, working class women, and white middle- and upper-class women.  Health topics include menarche and menstruation, childbirth, birth control and abortion, gynecological disorders and reproductive organ cancers, as well as mental health and mental illness.

•           Judith Walzer Leavitt,  Women and Health in American, 2nd ed.,  University of Wisconsin Press, 1999.

•           Tina Cassidy, Birth: The Surprising History of How We Are Born.  Grove Press, 2006

•           Marie Jenkins Schwartz, Birthing a Slave:  Motherhood and Medicine in the Antebellum South.  Harvard University Press, 2006.

•           Sarah Stage, Female Complaints:  Lydia Pinkham and the Business of Women’s Medicine.  W.W. Norton & Co., 1979.

•           Andrea Tone, Devices and Desires:  A History of Contraceptives in America.  Hill & Wang,  2001.

•           Jael Silliman, et. al, Undivided Rights:  Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice.  South End Press,  2004.

•           Barron H. Lerner, M.D.  The Breast Cancer Wars:  Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America.  Oxford University Press, 2001

Class participation = 30% of course grade

Writing assignments = 70% of course grade

Three 3-5 page essays = 14% each; for total of 42% of course grade;

8-10 page essay = 28% of course grade


WGS 345 • Women Radicals & Reformers

46960 • Mickenberg, Julia
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 436A
(also listed as AMS 370)
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Description

 

Concentrating on the twentieth century but beginning with eighteenth and nineteenth-century precedents and concluding with our contemporary moment, this course will look at women’s radical activism and traditions of reform through the lenses of American Studies and feminist ethics. Topics covered will include women’s challenges to slavery and lynching; campaigns for female education and women’s suffrage; women’s role in socialist and communist movements, the settlement house movement, labor activism, literary/aesthetic radicalism as it relates to political radicalism; the peace movement, and ethnic nationalism; the “waves” of women’s liberation; and intersectionality and the state of contemporary feminism. Throughout, we will use both women’s own words, as well as scholarship, films, and other elements of the documentary record to reflect upon the ways in which women’s radical and reform movements of the past provide ethical and moral frameworks for making choices in the present. Students will actively contribute to course content through research and presentations to the class, and through informed participation in class discussions.

 

Requirements

 

  1. Informed participation in class discussions.
  2. Semi-weekly short reflection papers, one of which will be revised and expanded for a letter grade
  3. Presentation, based on research, supplementing the reading for a particular week.
  4. Team research project requiring primary research and engagement with relevant scholarship.

 

Probable Texts

 

Women’s America: Refocusing the Past, ed. Linda K. Kerber and Jane Sherron De Hart (sixth edition)

Sheila Rowbotham, Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century

Emma Goldman, Anarchism and Other Essays

Tillie Olsen, Yonnondio

Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzulua, This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color

Jessa Crispin, Why I am Not a Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto


WGS 356 • Intro To Feminist Rsch Methods

46970 • Somers-Willett, Susan
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 310
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Introduction to feminist research methods across a range of traditional disciplines. Designed to prepare students to analyze research within gender studies and to develop their own research skills.


WGS 379L • Internship In Wgs

46995
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Experience working in the community or for a nonprofit agency.

Prerequisite: At least twelve semester hours of coursework in women's and gender studies and written consent of the supervising faculty member; consent forms are available in the Center for Women's and Gender Studies.

  • Internship courses are available as part of the class offerings at Women's and Gender Studies.  These are individual instruction courses and do not meet in the classroom as lectures do. 

  • Students are responsible for finding their own internships.  Resources on campus such as Liberal Arts Career ServicesLACS Internship Services, theCareer Exploration Center, the CWGS blog, and the WGS email list serves may help to find an internship.

  • After finding a place to work as an intern, students must also obtain a faculty supervisor for their internship.  CWGS can assist in matching a student with a faculty member based on research interests.  This faculty supervisor will be responsible for submitting a grade for the student. According to the Provost’s office - TAs, RAs, and GRAs are ineligible to serve as faculty supervisors.

  • Once students have an internship and a faculty supervisor, they must fill out and turn in the Internship Proposal Form (PDF) (DOC) to the CWGS office in order to be cleared to register for the course.

  • On the proposal form, the student and faculty member will explain how the student will be graded for the internship course.  Some students keep a work journal that they submit for a grade, some turn in a large paper at the end of their internship.  Other final grade assignments might include a presentation or a larger project that was done for the organization.

More Information at: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/academics/internships.php


WGS 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

46985
(also listed as AAS 679HA, AAS 679HB, AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, GK 679HA, GK 679HB, HMN 679HA, HMN 679HB, LAS 679HA, LAS 679HB, LAT 679HA, LAT 679HB, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, WGS 679HB)
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Undergraduate Thesis

An student pursing the B.A. in Women's & Gender Studies may choose between 3 hours from WGS 379L Internship in WGS or WGS 360 Research & Thesis in WGS.

The form should be turned in before registering for the WGS 360 Research & Thesis course. (PDF) (DOC)

Please note that a second reader is not required for the undergraduate thesis.  The undergraduate thesis must also be completed in one semester.

More Information at: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/academics/Undergrad-Thesis.php


WGS 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

46990
(also listed as AAS 679HA, AAS 679HB, AHC 679HA, AHC 679HB, C C 679HA, C C 679HB, GK 679HA, GK 679HB, HMN 679HA, HMN 679HB, LAS 679HA, LAS 679HB, LAT 679HA, LAT 679HB, LIN 679HA, LIN 679HB, WGS 679HA)
show description

Undergraduate Thesis

An student pursing the B.A. in Women's & Gender Studies may choose between 3 hours from WGS 379L Internship in WGS or WGS 360 Research & Thesis in WGS.

The form should be turned in before registering for the WGS 360 Research & Thesis course. (PDF) (DOC)

Please note that a second reader is not required for the undergraduate thesis.  The undergraduate thesis must also be completed in one semester.

More Information at: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/academics/Undergrad-Thesis.php



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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765