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David Crews


Associate FacultyPh.D., Rutgers University

Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology, College of Natural Sciences
David Crews

Contact

Interests


meaning of diversity in reproductive controlling mechanisms and the evolution of brain mechanisms controlling behavior

Biography


Education

  • B.A., University of Maryland, College Park, 1969
  • Ph.D., Psychobiology, Institute of Animal Behavior, Rutgers University, New Jersey, 1969

See also Dr. Crews' curriculum vita.

Research Interests

In general, Dr. Crews is interested in the meaning of diversity in reproductive controlling mechanisms and the evolution of brain mechanisms controlling behavior. Specifically, his research objectives are to (i) investigate how the environment regulates reproduction, (ii) determine how stimuli relevant to reproduction are perceived and integrated by the central nervous system, (iii) demonstrate how the central nervous system regulates internal reproductive state, and (iv) examine how change in internal state influence the expression of behavior. To this end he uses a comparative interdisciplinary approach that combines and integrates the molecular to the ecological levels of biological organization. His research is conducted in both the laboratory and the field because in this way the causal mechanisms and functional outcomes of reproductive processes are revealed at each level while illuminating the relations among the levels.

See also:

Instruction

Fall 1999

  • ZOO 390K.17 - Seminar in Physiology and Behavior

See also information on the Undergraduate Biomedical Training Program.

Awards/Honors

  • Grass Foundation Lecturer, 1997
  • Fellow, The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1996
  • Fellow, American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology, 1995
  • Fellow, American Psychological Society, 1991
  • Walker-Ames Professor, University of Washington, Seattle, 1991
  • NIMH MERIT Award, 1989
  • Irving I. Geschwind Memorial Lecturer, 1989
  • NIMH Research Scientist Award, 1988-1998
  • First Esquire Register of Outstanding Americans Under Age 40, 1984
  • Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1983
  • American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Award for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology, 1979
  • President's Award for Innovative Teaching, Harvard University , 1978
  • NIMH Research Scientist Development Award, 1977-1987
  • Sloan Fellow in Neuroscience, 1977-1979
  • Sigma Xi Scientific Research Honorary, 1976
  • Psi Chi Psychology Honorary Society, 1969
  • Key Scholar, University of Maryland, 1968-1969

Publications

Dr. Crews has published over 250 research articles, book chapters, and essays in the areas of reproductive biology, neuroscience and endocrinology and edited three books. Below are just a few:

  • David Crews and Jon Sakata. 2000. Evolution of brain mechanisms controlling sexual behavior. In Sexual Differentiation of the Brain. A. Matsumoto (ed.). CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. pp. 113-130.
  • David Crews. 1999. Sexuality: The environment organization of phenotypic plasticity. In Reproduction in Context. K. Wallen and J. Schneider (eds.). M.I.T. Press, Cambridge. pp. 473-499.
  • David Crews. 1999. Reptilian reproduction, overview. In Encyclopedia of Reproduction. Ernst Knobil and Jimmy D. Neill (eds.). Academic Press, New York. pp. 254-259.
  • David Crews and James Perran Ross. 1998. Consequences of hormone disruption of sexual development for crocodilian conservation. In Crocodiles. Proceedings of the 24th Working Meeting of the Crocodile Specialist Group of the Species Survival Commission of IUCN-The World Conservation Union. IUCN-The World Conservation Union, Gland Switzerland. pp. 174-190.
  • David Crews. 1998. Biology and relationships: Adaptation in nature. Family Systems 4: 99-106.
  • David Crews. 1998. The evolutionary antecedents of love. Psychoneuroendocrinology 23: 751-764.
  • David Crews. 1998. On the organization of individual differences in sexual behavior. American Zoologist 38: 118-132.
  • David Crews. 1994. Animal sexuality. Scientific American 270: 108-114.

Courses


WGS 323 • Animal Sexuality

46015 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PHR 2.114
(also listed as BIO 359R, BIO 383K)

This is a survey course and designed to teach both the fundamentals and the principles of modern research in sexuality. At the same time you will learn how to analyze and synthesize diverse scientific information. The course is roughly divided equally into two sections. The first half of the course will emphasize fundamentals and principles of modern research in sexuality. This will include the environmental regulation of reproduction, different mechanisms of sex determination, where and how protein and sex steroid hormones are produced and released and where and how they exert their action, the development of eggs and sperm (the gametes), how the brain, pituitary, and gonads interact to control and coordinate gamete production, how hormones exert their action at a genetic level, the effects of hormones early in life compared to later in life, and the structure and function of various brain areas that are important in the regulation of reproductive behaviors. The second half of the course will build on this information. It is essential that you know the principles from the first half as in the second half we learn about how hormones organize and modify female and male sexual and parental behaviors, the effects of stress on sexuality, the adverse effects of synthetic chemicals such as pesticides and fertilizers on wildlife and humans due to their mimicking the action of steroid hormones, how chemicals produced by one animal influence other individuals (pheromones) and how the production of these pheromones are controlled by hormones and sexual behaviors, how social organization can control of sexuality, and how hormones can influence how animals perceive the world around them.

WGS 323 • Animal Sexuality

46560 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PHR 2.114
(also listed as BIO 359R, BIO 383K)

This course will emphasize the basics of sex determination and sexual differentiation, particularly as it relates to reproduction from the different levels of biological organization, from the molecular to the evolutionary. We will also discuss in some detail the ways hormones influence gene expression, the development of organ systems and the structure of cells, the interactions of endocrine secretions, the behavior of individuals, the structure of social hierarchies, and the evolution of mating systems. By the end of this course you should be able to discuss intelligently issues such as homosexuality in man and animals, environmental consequences of the release of agricultural and manufacturing chemicals into the environment on health, how hormones regulate reproduction and behavior, how stress affects reproduction and the immune system, how birth control pills work, etc.

PSY 341K • Animal Sexuality

44040 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PHR 2.114

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

WGS 323 • Animal Sexuality

47270 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PHR 2.114
(also listed as BIO 359R, BIO 383K, PSY 341K)

This course will emphasize the basics of sex determination and sexual differentiation, particularly as it relates to reproduction from the different levels of biological organization, from the molecular to the evolutionary. We will also discuss in some detail the ways hormones influence gene expression, the development of organ systems and the structure of cells, the interactions of endocrine secretions, the behavior of individuals, the structure of social hierarchies, and the evolution of mating systems. By the end of this course you should be able to discuss intelligently issues such as homosexuality in man and animals, environmental consequences of the release of agricultural and manufacturing chemicals into the environment on health, how hormones regulate reproduction and behavior, how stress affects reproduction and the immune system, how birth control pills work, etc.

WGS 323 • Animal Sexuality

47620 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256
(also listed as BIO 359R, BIO 383K, PSY 341K)

This course will emphasize the basics of sex determination and sexual differentiation, particularly as it relates to reproduction from the different levels of biological organization, from the molecular to the evolutionary. We will also discuss in some detail the ways hormones influence gene expression, the development of organ systems and the structure of cells, the interactions of endocrine secretions, the behavior of individuals, the structure of social hierarchies, and the evolution of mating systems. By the end of this course you should be able to discuss intelligently issues such as homosexuality in man and animals, environmental consequences of the release of agricultural and manufacturing chemicals into the environment on health, how hormones regulate reproduction and behavior, how stress affects reproduction and the immune system, how birth control pills work, etc.

WGS 323 • Animal Sexuality

48375 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GRG 424
(also listed as BIO 359R, BIO 383K, PSY 341K)

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

WGS 323 • Animal Sexuality

47845 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256
(also listed as BIO 359R, BIO 383K, PSY 341K)

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 341K • Animal Sexuality

44065 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Animal Sexuality

43710 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Animal Sexuality

43015 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Animal Sexuality

41495 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Animal Sexuality

40017 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Animal Sexuality

40228 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WEL 2.256

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 341K • Animal Sexuality

40105 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM RLM 5.122

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.


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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765