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Lesley A Dean-Jones


Associate FacultyPh.D., Stanford

Associate Professor in the Department of Classics, College of Liberal Arts
Lesley A Dean-Jones

Contact

Interests


ancient medicine, philosophy, and gynecology; women in antiquity

Biography


Research

ancient medicine, philosophy, and gynecology; women in antiquity

Research Subject Headings: Gender, Health

Affiliated Research/Academic Unit

Fields: Ancient Philosophy, Ancient Medicine, Women in Antiquity
 

Courses


GK 383 • Survey Of Greek Literature

33155 • Fall 2016
Meets TH 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

Greek Literature Survey

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence surveying the major forms and genres of Greek literature from the Archaic through Classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. As in the first half, we’ll proceed mainly in chronological order, beginning with oratory and rhetoric in the fifth century BCE, moving on to historiography, philosophy, and Hellenistic poetry, and ending with Imperial literature from the second century CE. Most of our time and effort will be devoted to reading and analyzing representative selections by some of the more influential authors in these areas and periods. Readings will include large helpings of Greek, additional reading in translation, and critical commentary and scholarship.

The survey has multiple overlapping goals:

  • Strengthen and refine reading and translating skills: speed, accuracy, precision, etc.
  • Sharpen critical and analytical skills through exercises in close reading informed by recent scholarship and related resources.
  • Survey classical and later Greek literature in its various forms and genres, including how they developed and interacted over time.
  • Close study of representative examples of these forms and genres from each period.
  • Practice methods and techniques for developing and articulating an informed critical response to your reading, both orally and in writing.

The survey is also designed to help students prepare for the doctoral exams in literature, not as a glorified crib-sheet but by fostering the skills and core knowledge required for teaching and scholarship in Classics – precisely what the exams are meant to promote and assess. There is of course far more to Greek literature than we can explore here, but the survey will help students to develop both a global map of the wider terrain and the critical skills and resources to broaden and deepen that knowledge as they advance through the program and beyond.

Forms and periods covered include Classical prose (oratory, historiography, philosophy), New Comedy, Hellenistic poetry (including hymn, elegy, pastoral, epigram), and Imperial prose (including biography, novel, satire). Readings will be drawn from Antiphon, Gorgias, Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Menander, Callimachus, Aratus, Theocritus, Plutarch, Longus, Lucian, and others.

Grading: participation 10%, sight translation 20%, passage commentaries 25%, essays 35%

There is no final exam. In its place, the written portion of the doctoral exam in Greek Literature will be offered in two parts near the end of the semester:

   1) take-home portion over a weekend before the end of classes

   2) two essays at the scheduled final exam period

See  http://www.utexas.edu/cola/classics/graduate/admissions/exam-prompts/lit-written.php

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

32135 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM FAC 21

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

GK 324 • Euripides

32365 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 112

In this course we will read Euripides’ Iphigenia in Tauris.  This is considered one of Euripides' romance plays because it has a happy ending, yet it is mentioned several times in Aristotle's discussion of tragedy in the Poetics, usually favourably.  At the Junior level the primary aim of the course is to read and understand the Greek, so a great portion of the classes will be given over to translation.  We will also, however, spend time discussing interpretations of the play.  In addition we will read the Poetics in translation to see what it was about tragedy Aristotle felt it exhibited so well.

GK 390 • Aristotle's Biology

32630 • Spring 2015
Meets M 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as C C 383)

We should venture on the study of every kind of animal without distaste; for each and all will reveal to us something natural and something beautiful. Parts of Animals I.5, 645a21-23

When he came to develop his theories about living things, Aristotle had many predecessors among the Greeks whose endoxa (“reputable opinions”) he could use as the basis for his investigations along with his own meticulous observations.  Several medical authors had begun to develop an empirical hodos or “method” for their profession, but nobody before Aristotle had attempted a systematic approach to the study and classification of living things.  Aristotle, however, saw such an undertaking as central to the understanding of Nature itself.  About a quarter of the Aristotelian Corpus is biological in nature.

In this course we will examine not only the results of Aristotle’s method (do species have “essences”?  does Aristotle have a sense of a “scala naturae”?) but also the method itself, particularly his use of endoxa and his deployment of his observations (how and where were Aristotle’s arguments constrained by his underlying assumptions?  does his Doctrine of the Four Causes lend itself to biology easily?).  We will spend considerable time on his theory of reproduction.  Along the way we shall see Aristotle at his most brilliant (similarity to one’s parents is due to information they have passed on, not material) and at some of his sillier moments (hedgehogs copulate in the missionary position).

This course would be suitable for anybody interested in Aristotle’s method of inquiry generally, but it is presented as intellectual history rather than strict philosophy.  No philosophical background is required.  In fact, it will be an excellent introduction to the Aristotelian corpus for any student with no prior knowledge.  Some prominent scholars have argued that all of Aristotle’s philosophy is underpinned by a biological paradigm.  Although no other author before Aristotle had attempted this sort of inquiry, interest in the workings of the body, particularly the human body, is evident throughout ancient Greek culture and the course will help student identify and assess biological metaphors elsewhere in Greek literature. 

The course can be taken under a Greek number, a Philosophy number or a Classical Civilization number.  The last two will not require any translation of the original Greek.  I will meet separately for an hour each week to answer questions on the Greek from students taking it under the Greek number.  

GK 324 • Daphnis And Chloe: Anc Romance

33497 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 208

In this course we will read the romance Daphnis and Chloe, the only known work of the 2nd/3rd century AD Greek novelist Longus  It is one of five ancient Greek novels that have survived intact from the mid-1st to the 3rd c. CE. It is generally believed to fall chronologically in the middle of the group.  Like all the ancient Greek novels it has a wildly improbable plot involving exposure of noble children at birth, abductions, pirates, help from a god, sex and violence, all of which takes place in a conventional pastoral setting.  Because of its greater concern with depicting character as well as events Daphnis and Chloe is thought to be closer to the modern novel than its contemporaries are.  It is also the only one of the ancient Greek novels to open with a Preface which informs the reader, to some extent, of the author’s purpose beyond mere entertainment.  This is to help the reader understand the universal experience of Love and its significance for the human condition.  Some people take the work as a serious allegory of Love in all its manifestations, others as a tongue in cheek playful romance.  We will read all the text in Greek, commenting on the rhetorical style and imagery of the Greek Imperial period, sometimes called the “Second Sophistic”.  The pace starts off slow (half a page) and increases to 3-4 pages by the end of the semester.  As the pace quickens we will not be able to translate all the text in class, but I will make sure to take questions on the passages you had particular difficulty with.

WGS 345 • Women In Classical Antiquity

47410 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 201
(also listed as C C 348)

This class will address the question of the nature and the origin of the western attitude toward women from readings in a wide variety of material from the Greco-Roman period of antiquity.  Specific issues include 1) myths of matriarchy (did women rule in an earlier stage of human history?); 2) the relation between the images of women, marriage, sex and women's role in politics and religion in the literary texts and the actual experience of real women (why is there a disparity between image and reality?); 3) philosophical and medical views on the physical and mental nature of women (how do folklore and ideology affect "scientific" writers?); 4) the extent to which we can glimpse female consciousness in these (mostly) male-authored texts.

The study of this period of human history has constituted the core of a liberal education in the West for several centuries, but this education was, until comparatively recently, concerned almost solely with the lives and thoughts of only half the people alive at that time—the men.  Approaching the texts primarily through the female characters sheds a new perspective on the value of the works and raises the question of their relevance to contemporary society.  We shall see that whatever view we take on the position of women in society, the formulations and solutions of problems in male/female relationships in the Greek and Roman texts are thought-provoking and important.  We will examine the texts in a basically chronological order so that we can trace the development of themes and motifs and consider them in relation to women's changing role in society.

GK 324 • Euripides

33235 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GAR 1.134

In this course we will read Euripides’ Orestes.  At the Junior level the primary aim of the course is to read and understand the Greek, so a great portion of the classes will be given over to translation.  We will also, however, spend time discussing interpretations of the play.  In addition we will read the 17 other extant plays of Euripides in translation and the Choephoroi of Aeschylus and the Electra of Sophocles.

 On the days scheduled for translation you should have prepared the assigned text before the class period.  You may want to write out a translation for review purposes, but in class when called upon to translate you should read from the Greek. You may annotate your text with vocabulary, asterisks and lines linking adjectives to the nouns they modify, subjects to verbs, etc., but don’t become too reliant on these. Remember they will not be there on the tests.  The first 5 minutes of each translation class will be given over to a vocabulary test where I will give you 5 words in the form they appeared in the assigned text and ask you to translate them.  On 3 occasions during the semester I will substitute a very short unseen for the vocabulary test.  These will not be announced beforehand.  On the days scheduled for discussion of the other plays you should read the play and answer the study questions which I will post on Blackboard by the class period before. 

GK 365 • Plato And Greek Prose

33242 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as GK 385)

This course has two distinct levels and two distinct threads.

The first thread, which will be the same for students in both 365 & 385 (though the grading will differ), is a fairly close reading of Plato’s Symposium.  We will start slowly and work up to 5 pages a week in the first half of the course.  In the second half of the course we will be reading 6-9 pages a week.  To begin with we should be able to cover the whole assignment in class.  Students will be called on to translate, from the TEXT, not a written-out translation.  You may write out a translation if you think it will help you to review, but do not use it in class. You may make annotations in your text, but try to keep them to a minimum; they will not be there on the tests.  Once we get to about 3 pages we will not be able to cover the whole assignment in class, so I depend on you to read carefully and identify any passages that you do not fully understand.  This material will be tested on the Tests and Final by passages for translation and grammatical and stylistic comment.  We will not be doing any philosophical heavy lifting in this course.  I expect these translations to be very accurate for both 365 and 385 students.

The second thread involves more rapid reading of selections from the prose authors on the Reading List for the Greek PhD translation exam.  Again we will start slowly and work up to 20 pages a week.  (This is only a minimum; if you can read more you should do so.) In these class sessions we will spend some time discussing the overall style and context of the selections. We will not be able to cover all of these assignments in class from the beginning of the course, and again you should try to identify passages that you would particularly like to go over in class.  This material will be tested on the Tests and Final by passages for translation.  The passages for students in 365 will be glossed and will be graded as if they were Unseens.  For students in 385 only very unusual words will be glossed, and I will expect a certain accuracy, although not to the same level as in the Symposium translations.

In addition to these requirements students in 365 will prepare 3 polished translations of roughly an OCT page of text from the Reader.  They will also write a term paper of 5-6 pages which will involve an oral presentation and a rewrite. Students in 385 will, in addition to the Symposium passage and the passage from the Reader, translate an unseen passage on each test and the final.

 

 

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33010 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 101
(also listed as CTI 310)

Present day Western civilization has many roots, but the significance of the heritage from ancient Greece cannot be overestimated.  It laid the groundwork for and shaped our literature, art, politics, philosophy, science, education and many of our cultural assumptions.  But it is still in many ways a strange and foreign country.  This course offers an introduction to ancient Greek culture from its beginnings to the end of the Classical period, conventionally placed at the death of Alexander in 323 B.C.  This course is not a history course per se.  We will learn a chronological outline of the most significant events in Greek history, but we will primarily focus on the literary and artistic masterpieces of ancient Greece and the social and cultural context in which they were produced

 

The first class period of each week will be spent amplifying a chapter from a secondary text that will provide the context for the primary works which we will look at on the Wednesday and Friday of each week.

 

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

 

The Cambridge Illustrated History of Greece, ed. Paul Cartledge, Cambridge University Press 2002. ISBN 0-521-52100-9

 

Reader of select primary texts, available from Speedway

GK 324 • Apollonius

33247 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM WAG 208

Apollonius' Argonautica is the fullest extant telling of the myth of Jason and the Argonauts and their quest for the Golden Fleece.  Although Apollonius was a contemporary of Callimachus he used Homeric epic hexameter as a model for his verse.  However, his concern for the psychology of his characters, and his interest in romance and adventure foreshadow aspects of the Hellenistic novel.

There are four books to the Argonautica, and of these Book III is by far the most admired.  This book tells how Medea helped Jason fulfill his quest and brilliantly re-presents the two characters that would have been familiar to Apollonius’ audience from Euripides' play.

We will read the entire third book in Greek, paying attention to epic forms and metre but also to Hellenistic trends such as the interest in local customs and the rationalization of divinities.  We will also read the other three books in translation.

 Required texts

 Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica: Book III, ed. R.L. Hunter, Cambridge University Press 1989. ISBN-13: 978-0-521-312363

Jason and the Golden Fleece (The Argonautica), trans. with intro. & explanatory notes by R.L. Hunter, Oxford University Press 2009. ISBN-978-0-19-953872-0

C C 348 • Moral Agency In Greek Tragedy

32953 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.112
(also listed as CTI 345)

Authority: Acceptance, Acquiescence and Assertion: Moral Agency in Greek Tragedy

 

Readings

Aeschylus: The Oresteia

Euripides: Iphigeneia at Aulis

Sophocles: Philoctetes

 

Course Objectives

The primary aim of this course is to introduce you to some of the masterpieces of Greek tragedy, works which have had an incalculable influence on Western civilization.  I will explain the social and cultural background of the texts, identify some of the questions that they pose and suggest some interpretations, but the ultimate aim is for you to feel comfortable enough with these works that you are ready to offer your own interpretations of character and action.  Several class sessions will be given over to sketching analogous situations which you might realistically expect to encounter in your lives and “pre-scripting” possible courses of action using the figures of Orestes, Achilles and Neoptolemus as either models or foils.

 

We will discuss a limited section of the text each class session in light of study questions I will distribute beforehand.  You should read the text with the study questions in mind before class and be prepared to ask and answer questions on the text.  When preparing for the midterm and the final you should use the study questions as a guide to the sort of questions I might ask, and organize material from the readings, my lectures and your own notes accordingly.

 

Pre-scripting of action:

This course is flagged as one that explicitly discusses issues of practical ethics and leadership.  In the plays we will read, three protagonists are placed in situations where they are asked to do something about which they clearly have ethical misgivings.  Orestes is told to kill his mother by Apollo; Achilles is asked by the Greek army, and eventually by Iphigeneia herself, to stand by and let a young girl be sacrificed so that the Greeks can destroy Troy; Neoptolemus is pressured to lie, cheat and steal by Odysseus, again so that Troy might fall.  It is my fervent hope that none of you ever find yourselves in exactly these situations, but it is eminently conceivable that at some point in your lives you will face an ethical dilemma or challenge in which your values will conflict with what you are encouraged to do by an authority you consider infallible, by peer pressure, or by a mentor. We will spend a session after concluding each play brainstorming as many such situations as we can as a class.  Each student will then have a week to produce a “pre-script” of how they would behave in one of the situations we have agreed are a close analogy to the situation in the play.  There will be further instructions for this exercise. 

 

LAT 365 • Lucretius

33359 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as LAT 385)

Lucretius’ poem De Reum Natura can be seen as structured around three pairs of books.  Books 1 & 2 explain the nature of atoms and the void and how these produce the qualities of perceivable phenomena in general; Books 3 & 4 focus on the construction of the soul from atomic elements and how this explains its properties; Books 5 & 6 move outward to discuss the construction of the cosmos and cosmic phenomena.  In this course we shall focus on books 3 & 4 and cover material such as Lucretius’ arguments for the corporality of the soul and therefore its ultimate dissolution at death; how it develops the powers of sense perception and how we can be deceived by the information they give us—though they never lie; his anti-teleological argument; and, of course, his diatribe against passion and sex. To cover both books we will need to read about 200 lines a week and, after a brief introduction to Epicurean philosophy, the first couple of weeks of class will be devoted to translating as much as possible in class. Once students are more comfortable with the Latin we shall devote more time to discussing issues of style, metrics, philosophy, earlier Latin poetry and the influence of Lucretius on later poets—particularly Vergil.  At this stage we may not cover all the Latin text in class, but students will always be able to ask to go over any passage they were unable to figure out by themselves. The grade for the course will depend on 2 midterms (20% each), a short translation and commentary (20%) and a longer (9-12 pages) paper (40%).  Each student will make an oral presentation on the topic of their longer paper. The length of the oral presentation will depend on the number of students in the class.  The long paper will be due two weeks before the end of the semester so students will have time to revise their paper. Required texts: Lucretius: De Rerum Natura III, ed. P.M. Brown (Warminster 1997)         Lucretius: De Rerum Natura IV, ed. J. Godwin (Warminster 1987)

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

33270 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM GSB 2.126

This course offers a survey of ancient Greek culture from its beginnings to the

The aim of this course is to introduce you to some of the masterpieces of Greek literature from the Archaic and Classical eras of Greek civilization, works which have had an incalculable influence on Western civilization.  I will explain the background of the texts, identify some of the questions that they pose and suggest some interpretations, but the ultimate aim is for you to feel comfortable enough with these works that you wish to read further in them yourselves, looking for your own questions and answers.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement; it may also be counted as an elective.

Texts:


Texts - All required

The Iliad of Homer, trans. Richmond Lattimore

The Odyssey of Homer, trans. Richmond Lattimore

Sappho: A New Translation, trans. Mary Barnard

Aeschylus I: Oresteia, trans. Richmond Lattimore

The Complete Plays of Sophocles, ed. Moses Hadas

Euripides: Ten Plays, ed. Moses Hadas

Aristophanes: Four Comedies, ed. William Arrowsmith

The Trial and Death of Socrates, trans. G.M.A. Grube

Plato: The Republic, trans. G.M.A. Grube

GK 365 • Female Poets Of Ancient Greece

33508 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 10
(also listed as GK 385)

GK 365 Seminar in Greek:

Critical study of authors such as Thucydides, Demosthenes, and Aeschylus.

Prerequisites: Greek 324 or 328.

Carries the Independent inquiry and Writing flags.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

32375 • Fall 2010
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

GK 506 FIRST-YEAR GREEK I

32375

MTWTHF

900 to  1000a

WAG  10

DEAN-JONES, L

 


32380

MTWTHF

1100 to  1200p

WAG  10

WHITE, S

 

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Greek 506 can be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

 

Texts:

Crosby and Schaeffer, An Introduction to Greek (Dover 2009)

C C S303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

82190 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM WAG 101

Myths are stories that encode a culture's values, hopes, and fears. They describe the shape of the universe according to that culture and the processes by which it has assumed this shape.  They express the perceived relationship between humans and the gods, between men and women, between different groups of humans. They explain the reasons for the conventions within a society. They examine the consequences of challenging these conventions. They deal with the most profound of human experiences: birth, love, loyalty, redemption, hate, suffering, sacrifice, death.  They were shaped by, but also helped to shape the societies in which they were produced and have continued to be retold and have a profound effect on all western culture to this day.

In this course we shall examine both the significance of the bare-bones of the myth (to the extent that it can be identified) and how individual authors have shaped plot lines and characters to produce unique versions of a story.  Material culture (archaeological sites, vase painting, etc.) will be used to complement the literary material.  We shall also consider a variety of theories put forward by contemporary scholars on the basic structure and meaning of myth. Ultimately students should be able to recognize not only retellings of ancient myth in our society but also some of the myths we have created ourselves.

Objectives
Students in this course will:
*    Become familiar with the sources for Greek myth
*    Learn the basic categories and details of written Greek myths
*    Learn the ancient artistic and monumental representations of Greek myths
*    Understand the cultural context of Greek myths
*    Know basic mythic chronology and geography
*    Become familiar with modern theories on the significance of myth

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32465 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 4.112

See attachment

GK 390 • Ancient Medicine

32765 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

See attachment

GK 385 • Plato And Greek Prose

32885 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

GK 385 Graduate Reading Course:

Topics given in recent years include Plato and Greek prose, Sophocles, and Sophists.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32630 • Spring 2008
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 100

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

32875 • Spring 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:00AM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

GK 390 • Plato

33395 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

LAT 312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

33570 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A217A

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

GK W804 • Intensive First-Year Greek

83500 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-11:00AM WAG 10

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

GK W412 • Intensive Greek

83510 • Summer 2007

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

31940 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 100

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 323 • Caesar

32400 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 208

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

GK 385 • Rdng Crs: Sophocles

32920 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as GK 365)

GK 385 Graduate Reading Course:

Topics given in recent years include Plato and Greek prose, Sophocles, and Sophists.

GK 390 • Plato

32945 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

GK W804 • Intensive First-Year Greek

83425 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-11:00AM WAG 10

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

30985 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 1.308

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

GK 365 • Female Poets

31270 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112
(also listed as GK 385)

GK 365 Seminar in Greek:

Critical study of authors such as Thucydides, Demosthenes, and Aeschylus.

Prerequisites: Greek 324 or 328.

Carries the Independent inquiry and Writing flags.

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

30735 • Fall 2005
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

GK W804 • Intensive First-Year Greek

82970 • Summer 2005
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-11:00AM WAG 10

For over thirty years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.

For over thirty-three years, Intensive Summer Greek at UT Austin has been giving students of diverse backgrounds and interests a rapid and deep understanding of the structure of the Greek language and a love of Greek prose and poetry.  You need have no previous knowledge of Greek. If you have had a semester or two or more, the special approach in this  course will strengthen your grasp of how Greek works and why it is so subtle a vehicle for conveying ideas.

You will use *Lexis*, a unique textbook and reader designed by the late Gareth Morgan.  All of its exercises are based on full passages of real, unaltered and unabbreviated Classical Greek.  First readings of Ionic Greek will make you aware of word formation, and that knowledge will enable you to acquire vocabulary quickly.  Ionic Greek also is a main component of the Homeric dialect.  Once you learn it, you can move easily forward to standard Attic authors and Biblical Greek and backward to Greek epic verse.

You will not read one dreary practice sentence made up in clever desperation or desperate ingenuity.  By the sixth day, you will be reading continuous pure Herodotus.  All students who successfully complete the course will be well prepared for sophomore level classes and dedicated students from past intensive courses have been able to go into classes at higher levels.  Students of other subjects have used Greek right away to enrich and inform their studies.

Students must register for both GK W804 and W412.  The course runs through both summer sessions.  It meets for five hours each day for about fifty class days, and, if satisfactorily completed, counts for 12 semester hours. Classes working under these language-saturation conditions have achieved an enthusiasm and spirit conducive to an unusually rich learning experience.   Usually, in the second half, besides ample grammar review, we read Homer's Odyssey IX, Euripides' Medea, Plato's Apology, and some supplementary readings handed out in class.  Outside of class we have informal play and poetry readings. Come join us.

GK 390 • Ancient Medicine

29935 • Spring 2005
Meets MW 1:30PM-3:00PM WAG 10

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

LAT 312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

30127 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 112

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

C C 348 • Women In Classical Antiq-W

30375 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BIO 301

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT S507 • First-Year Latin II

83090 • Summer 2004
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WAG 208

This course is a continuation of Latin 506.  It has two main aims:  to increase the student's fluency in Latin through reading and close examination of grammar and syntax, and to introduce students to Roman life and culture.

There will be daily assignments from Wheelock’s Latin, including review of Chapters 1-27 and a careful study of Chapters 27-40.  This will be supplemented by further connected readings from Caesar’s Gallic Wars.

Prerequisites:  Completion of Latin 506 or the equivalent with a grade of C or higher.

Latin 507 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Intermediate Latin (Latin 311 and 312), where they will read selections from Vergil, Cicero, and other authors

C C 348 • Ancient Greek Medicine-W

28460 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 308

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

28830 • Spring 2004
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM CBA 4.326

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper) optional

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

LAT 311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

29235 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 208

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

LAT 311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

29240 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 112

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

LAT F311 • Sec-Yr Lat I: Sel Rom Writers

83175 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 308

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

28505 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 106

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

GK 324 • Plato

28770 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 208

GK 324 Advanced Greek:

Reading and analysis of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, and Plato.

Prerequisites: Greek 312K or 312L (or 322) with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of at least A-, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

C C S306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

83065 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 101

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

28385 • Spring 2002
Meets MTWTHF 9:00AM-10:00AM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

28910 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 106

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

GK 324 • Sophocles

29180 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

GK 324 Advanced Greek:

Reading and analysis of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, and Plato.

Prerequisites: Greek 312K or 312L (or 322) with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of at least A-, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

GK 390 • Plato

29240 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 10

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

GK 390 • Ancient Medicine And Rhetoric

28805 • Spring 2001
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 419

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

C C 306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

28980 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 106

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

Grading: 7 scheduled tests, lowest test score dropped. No final.

C C 348 • Women In Classical Antiquity

29075 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 201

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 323 • Cicero

29490 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 112

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

C C F306M • Intro To Medcl & Scientif Term

82635 • Summer 2000
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM WAG 201

This course provides a systematic introduction to medical and scientific terminology. In this course you will acquire a working knowledge of the Greek and Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes which are fundamental to understanding ‘medspeak’, i.e. the specialized language of healthcare. You will learn the principles of word analysis, synthesis, and pronunciation. To help you both memorize and gain a better appreciation of the origins of medical terminology, this course will introduce you to some of the relevant elements of ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture. There are no prerequisites. Although we will be working with Latin and Greek terms, no background knowledge of these languages is required.

This course carries the Global Cultures flag. Global Cultures courses are designed to increase your familiarity with cultural groups outside the United States. You should therefore expect a portion of your grade to come from the course material on ancient Greek and Roman medico-scientific culture.

C C 304C • Ancient Greek Medicine

27855 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 201
(also listed as C C 348)

C C 304C Topics in the Ancient World:

An introductory survey of the highlights of Greek and Roman civilization and early Christianity. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

28135 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CBA 4.332

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

Publications


Book: Women's Bodies in Classical Greek Science  pp.293, (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1994).  Reprinted in paperback 1996.  Put on-line by OUP with Questia in 2001.  Conclusion translated into Spanish and used as Introduction to separate fascicle on ancient gynecology in Arenal 7 (2000), 267-300.

Article: "Too much of a good thing: the health of Olympic athletes in ancient Greece," in East meets West at the Olympic Games, Volume I, ed. Susan E. Brownell (New York: Greekworks 2013), 49-65.

Article: "The Child Patient of the Hippocratics: Early Pediatrics?" in The Oxford Handbook of Childhood and Education in the Classical World, edd. Tim Perkins & Judith Evans Grubbs (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2013), 180-99..

Article: "Clinical gynecology and Aristotle's biology," Apeiron 45 (2012), 180-99.

Article: “De medico: a metapaedogogical text,” in Ancient Medical Education: Proceedings of the XIIth Colloque Hippocratique, ed. H.F.J. Horstmannshoff (Leiden: Brill 2010), 1-15.

Article: “Prostitution as a Smoke-screen in a 4th c. B.C.E. Law Case,” Zmanin (Israeli equivalent of History Magazine) 90 (2005), 40-9.

Article: “Written Texts and the Rise of the Charlatan in Ancient Greek Medicine,” Writing into Culture: Written Text and Cultural Practice in Ancient Greece, ed. Harvey Yunis, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2003), 97-121.

Article: “Aristotle’s understanding of Plato’s Receptacle and its significance for Aristotle’s theory of familial resemblance,” Reason and Necessity: Essays on Plato’s Timaeus, ed. M.R. Wright (London: Duckworth 2000), 101-12.

Article: "Philosophy and Science," Cambridge Illustrated History of Ancient Greece, ed. Paul Cartledge (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), 288-319.

Article: "Teaching Medical Terminology as a Classics Course," Classical Journal 93 (1998), pp.290-6.

Article: “Autopsia, Historia and What Women Know:  The Authority of Women in Hippocratic Gynaecology,” Knowledge and the Scholarly Medical Traditions:  A Comparative Study, ed. Don Bates (Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press 1995), 41-58.

Article: “Menexenus—Son of Socrates,” Classical Quarterly  45 (1995), 51-57.

Article: “The ‘Proof’ of Anatomy,” Women in the Classical World:  Image and Text, edd. Elaine Fantham et al. (New York:  Oxford University Press, 1994), 183-205.

Article: “The Politics of Pleasure:  Female Sexual Appetite in the Hippocratic Corpus,” Helios 19 (1992), 72-91. (Reprinted in Discourses of Sexuality:  From Aristotle to Aids, ed. Domna Stanton (Ann Arbor:  University of Michigan Press, 1992), 48-77.)

Article: “The Cultural Construct of the Female Body in Classical Greek Science,” Women's History and Ancient History, ed. Sarah B. Pomeroy (Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press, 1991), 111-137. (Reprinted in Sex and Difference in Ancient Greece and Rome, edd. Mark Golden & Peter Toohey (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003), 183-201.)

Article: “Menstrual Bleeding According to the Hippocratics and Aristotle,” Transactions of the American Philological Association 119 (1989), 179-194.

Article: “The Role of Ephialtes in the Development of Athenian Democracy,” Classical Antiquity 6 (1987), 53-76.

Encyclopedia article: “Hair and Hairiness,” in 100,000 Years of Beauty, vol.2, Ancient Civilizations, ed.Claude Calamé (Paris: Les Éditions Babylone 2009), 88-91.

Encyclopedia article: "Hippocratic Corpus, Gynecological Works," Encyclopedia of Ancient Natural Scientists: The Greek Tradition and its Many Heirs, edd. Paul T. Keyser & Georgia L. Irby-Massie (New York: Routledge 2008), 401-3.

Encyclopedia article: Translations with commentary of Pseudo-Aristotelian Problems 4.26& Caelius Aurelianus’ On Chronic Disorders 4.9 for Sourcebook for Homosexuality in the Ancient World, ed. T.K. Hubbard (Berkeley: University of California Press 2003), 262-4 & 463-5.

Review: Hippocrates' Woman: Reading the Female Body in Ancient Greece by Helen King (London: Routledge, 1998) for Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 74 (2000), 812-3.

Review: Hippocrates: Places in Man, trans., ed. & comm. by Elizabeth M. Craik (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998) for Classical World 94 (2000), 100-1.

Review: Hippocrates by Jacques Jouanna, trans. M.B. DeBevoise (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999) for Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 56 (2001), 81-3.

Review: Abortion in the Ancient World, Konstantinos Kapparis (London: Duckworth, 2002) for American Journal of Philology 124 (2003), 613-6.

Review: The Staff of Oedipus: Transforming Disability in Ancient Greece, Martha L. Rose (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press 2003) for The American Historical Review, 110 (2005), 531-2.

Review: Galen on the Brain, Julius Rocca (Leiden: Brill 2004) for Apeiron, 39 (2006), 221-4.

Review: In the Grip of Disease, G.E.R. Lloyd (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2003) for Ancient Philosophy 27 (2007), 205-8.

Review: Compendium of Greek Thought, edd. Jacques Brunschwig et al. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000) for The Washington Times (2/17/01).

Work in Progress


Historia Animalium.  Consisting of Pseudo-Aristotle: De Non Generando & Aristotle: Dialectic on De Non Generando.  Translation with Introduction and Commentary.  (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming)

"Gynaecology," forthcoming in The Cambridge Companion to Hippocrates, edd. Steven Spiegl & Peter Pormann (Cambridge University Press).

What is natural about the Aristotelian oikos?

Polybus' Heartless Man.

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


External Links



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  • Center for Women's & Gender Studies

    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
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