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Mary Neuburger


ProfessorPh.D., 1997, University of Washington

Mary Neuburger

Contact

  • Phone: 512-232-4124
  • Office: BUR 456
  • Office Hours: Spring 2015: T 10 a.m.-12 p.m., W 2-3:30 p.m., Th 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography


Research interests

Professor Neuburger's focus is on modern eastern Europe with a specialization in southeastern Europe. Her research interests include urban culture, consumption, commodity exchange, gender and nationalism.

Courses taught

Her courses explore ethnic conflict, nationalism, gender, and other topics in East Central European as well as Balkan history.

 

Recent Publications: 

Professor Neuburger's book, The Orient Within: Muslim Minorites and the Negotiation of Nationhood in Modern Bulgaria (2004), explores the evolution of Bulgarian nationalism in light of encounters with the Islamic past and a Muslim minority presence. Her recent book, Balkan Smoke: Tobacco and the Making of Modern Bulgaria (Cornell, 2012) explores the production, exchange, and consumption of tobacco in Bulgaria (and beyond) in the 19th and 20th centuries. She also has a recently released co-edited book with Dr. Paulina Bren, Communism Unwrapped: Consumption in Cold War Eastern Europe, which carefully outlines and compiles new work on the distinct and varied concerns linked to consumption under communism across Eastern Europe.

 

 LINK to Dr Neuburger's website.

 

Courses


REE 381 • Smnr Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Civ/Cul

44595 • Fall 2016
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM BUR 128

This is the introductory research seminar to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.  It consists of a series of guest lectures by a diverse cast of CREEES faculty in order to give the students as  broad an overview of the field as possible.

Prerequisites: graduate standing. 

Readings:  Distributed by visiting lecturers a week before each lecture

Grading:  

  • Participation: 10%
  • Oral presentation: 40%
  • Final research paper: 50%

 

REE 381 • Smnr Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Civ/Cul

43815 • Fall 2015
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM BUR 228

This is the introductory seminar to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.  It consists of a series of guest lectures by a   diverse cast of CREEES faculty in order to give the students as  broad an overview of the field as possible.

Prerequisites: graduate standing. 

Readings:  Distributed by visiting lecturers a week before each lecture

Grading:   Participation:             10%

              Oral presentation:       40%

               Final research paper:  50%

HIS 383 • Conflict/Coexist East Europe

38940 • Spring 2015
Meets T 12:30PM-3:30PM GAR 1.122
(also listed as REE 385)

This reading seminar will explore the history of modern Eastern Europe through the prism of national identity politics.  Readings and discussion will first expose students to theoretical works, and various disciplinary approaches, on the concepts of national identity and ethnic conflict. We will then proceed to explore concrete cases of the history of ethnic coexistence and its development into discreet national conflicts in the modern period. We will then analyze patterns of conflict and coexistence in the region as they have been described and explained and debated in the existing literature.  In the northern tier of Eastern Europe the focal point will be on historical tensions between Germans and non-Germans, Jews and non-Jews, as well as the rise of anti-Semitism and the local contours of the Holocaust.  For Southeastern Europe, the course will focus attention on Muslim minorities, Muslim-non-Muslim relations, but also the myriad national identities formed on the basis of language, religion, and historical experience.  Disintegration of the former Yugoslavia will be a major theme.

Texts:

Charles King, Extreme Politics: Nationalism, Violence and the End of Eastern Europe.

Pieter Judson, Guardians of the Nation: Activists on the Language Frontiers of Imperial Austria.

Chad Bryant. Prague in Black: Nazi Rule and Czech Nationalism (2007). 

Kate Brown, A Biography of No Place.

Timothy Snyder, Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin.

Serhii Ploky, Ukraine and Russia. 

Holly Case, Between States: The Transylvania Question and the European Idea during World War II.

Harris Mylonas, The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees, and Minorities.

Keith Brown, Loyal Unto Death: Trust and Terror in Revolutionary Macedonia.

Mary Neuburger,The Orient Within: Muslim Minorities and The Negotiation of Nationhood in Modern Bulgaria

Lenard Cohen and Jasna Dragovic-Soso eds., State Collapse in Southeastern Europe: New Perspectives on Yugoslavia’s Disintegration.

F. Bieber and Z. Daskalovski, Understanding the War in Kosovo.

REE 385 • Understandg Communism In E Eur

45580 • Spring 2014
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 2.124
(also listed as HIS 383)

Understanding Communism In Eastern Europe

 This course explores the complicated nature of communist rule in its many forms and lived experience in Eastern Europe from 1945-1989.  Readings will delve into the most recent writings that try and elucidate the “roads to communism” taken from Poland in the North to Yugoslavia in the South. The course will be inherently comparative, with attention to the broader international, that is, Cold War context.  Expect to cover issues ranging from state-society dynamics, to religion, consumer culture, high culture and collectivization.  

The Following are among the Readings for the course: 

Vladimir Tismaneanu, The Devil in History: Communism, Fascism, and Some Lessons of the Twentieth Century.Gail Kligman and Katherine Verdery, Peasants under Siege: The Collectivization of Romanian Agriculture, 1949-1962.Krisztina Fehervary, Politics in Color and Concrete: Socialist Materialities and the Middle Class in Hungary.Paulina Bren, The Greengrocer and His TV: The Culture of Communism After the 1968 Prague Spring.Paulina Bren and Mary Neuburger, Communism Unwrapped: Consumption in Cold War Eastern Europe.Patrick Patterson, Bought and Sold: Living and Losing the Good Life in Socialist Yugoslavia.

 Grades will be based on participation (20%), short response papers (10%), and a final research paper (70% - this breaks down into 10% proposal/bibliography, 20% First Draft, 35% final draft).

 Participation: Students are required to come to class and participate in every session. Each un-excused absence is an automatic -2% of your final grade, and a doctor’s note must be presented for excused absences.  Short response papers (one paragraph and three questions) will be required for each week in which readings are assigned.

EUS 346 • Southeast Europe In 20th Cen

36455 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 212
(also listed as HIS 362G, J S 364, REE 335)

Through lecture and discussion this course will provide an in-depth exploration of the key events and developments of Southeastern Europe, the region commonly referred to as the Balkans, in the twentieth century.  After providing some of the basics on geography and pre-20th century developments, we will move on to a detailed investigation of this tumultuous century in a region that was wracked by war, revolution, ethnic conflict, the Holocaust, and 45 years of Communist regimes and Cold War tensions.  We will cover the territories of Romania, Albania, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslavia, and to a lesser extent Greece and Turkey. Key themes will be ethnic identity, nationalism, authoritarianism, resistance, gender and violence. The final chapter of the course will look at the fall of communism in the region and the outbreak of war in the former Yugoslavia.   

Required Texts:

Mark Mazower, The Balkans: A Short History.

John Lampe, Balkans into Southeastern Europe.

Katherine Verdery, What was Socialism and what comes Next

Slavenka Drakulic,  How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed

Zlatko Anguelov, Communism and the Remorse of an Innocent Victimizer.

Emir Sujagic, Postcards from the Grave.

Ismail Kadare,  The Successor.

 

Grading

Grading will be based on a take-home mid-term (30%); an end of quarter in-class exam (30%); a primary document assignment (20%); a map quiz (5%); 5 short quizzes on assigned readings (2% each – 10%); and participation (5%) – based on attendance.  

 

HIS 383 • Conflict/Coexist East Europe

39705 • Spring 2012
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 2.124
(also listed as REE 385)

This graduate seminar will explore the history of modern Eastern Europe through the prism of national identity politics.  Through reading and discussion, students will be exposed to theoretical works on national identity and then explore concrete cases of the historical development of national identities in the region. We will then analyze patterns of conflict and coexistence in the region as they have been described and explained and debated in the existing literature.  In the northern tier of Eastern Europe the focal point will be on historical tensions between Germans and non-Germans, as well as the evolution of anti-Semitism and the local contours of the Holocaust.  For Southeastern Europe, the course will focus attention on Muslim minorities, Muslim-non-Muslim relations, but also the myriad national identities formed on the basis of language, religion, and historical experience.  The conflicts and disintegration of the former Yugoslavia will be a major theme. Students should come out with a well rounded knowledge of historical and to contemporary issues surrounding identity politics in the region. 

Select Required Texts

1. Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities.  Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism. 

2. Pieter Judson, Guardians of the Nation: Activists on the Language Frontiers of Imperial Austria. 

3. Keely Stauter-Halsted. The Nation in the Village: The Genesis of Peasant National Identity in Austrian Poland, 1848-1914 (2001).

4. Tara Zahra, Kidnapped Souls: National Indifference and the Battle for Children in the Bohemian Lands, 1900-1948.

5. Chad Bryant. Prague in Black: Nazi Rule and Czech Nationalism (2007). 

6. Rogers Brubaker, Nationalist Politics and Everyday Ethnicity in a Transylvanian Town.

7. Keith Brown. The Past in Question: Modern Macedonia and the Uncertainties of Nation.

8. Theodora Dragostinova, Between Two Motherlands: Nationality and Emigration among the Greeks of Bulgaria, 1900-1949.

9. Mark Mazower. Salonica: City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims and Jews 1430-1950 (2006).

10. Mary Neuburger, The Orient Within: Muslim Minorities and the Negotiation of Nationhood in Modern Bulgaria. 

11. Maya Shatzmiller, ed. Islam and Bosnia: Conflict Resolution and Foreign Policy in Multi-Ethnic States. 

12. Brad Blitz, ed. War and Change in the Balkans: Nationalism, Conflict and Cooperation

EUS 346 • Southeast Europe In 20th Cen

36524 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 1
(also listed as HIS 362G, J S 364, REE 335)

Through lecture and discussion this course will provide an in-depth exploration of the key events and developments of Southeastern Europe, the region commonly referred to as the Balkans, in the twentieth century.  After providing some of the basics on geography and pre-20th century developments, we will move on to a detailed investigation of this tumultuous century in a region that was wracked by war, revolution, ethnic conflict, the Holocaust, and Cold War tensions.  We will cover the territories of Romania, Albania, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslavia, and to a lesser extent Greece and Turkey. Key themes will be ethnic identity, nationalism, authoritarianism, resistance, and violence. The final chapter of the course will be the fall of communism in the region and the outbreak of war in Bosnia and Kosovo.   

Texts

Mark Mazower, The Balkans: A Short History.

Leon Trotsky, The War Correspondence of Leon Trotsky: The Balkan Wars 1912-13.

Slavenka Drakulic,  How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed

Kapka Kassabova, Street without a Name: Childhood and Other Misadventures in Bulgaria.

Tzvetan Todorov, Voices from the Gulag: Life and Death in Communist Bulgaria

Eric Stover, Witnesses: War Crimes and the Promise of Justice in the Hague.

Grading

Assignments will include a mid-term (25%), an end of quarter exam (25%), a book review (15%) and a short research assignment (30%).  Participation will be 5% of the grade.   

EUS 346 • Jews Of Eastern Europe-W

35592 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 1.126
(also listed as HIS 362G, REE 335)

Please check back for updates.

HIS 347L • Seminar In Historiography-W

39090 • Spring 2009
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 0.132

SEMINAR IN HISTORIOGRAPHY: HONORS PROGRAM

Open only to students admitted to the History Honors program.

This seminar introduces students to a range of historical methods, topics, and sources, with no claim to being comprehensive. We will consider how “history” has changed along with other forms of knowledge. We will read different kinds of history (social, intellectual, cultural, and so on). We emphasize research with primary sources that students will be able to use in their theses.

Faculty from the Department of History will lead discussions about their areas of expertise, giving the class examples of documents and sources that historians use, or showing how they generate questions for research.  By the end of the semester, each student will have come up with an advisor and a prospectus for the senior thesis she or he will write next year.

This is a reading- and writing-intensive course, and it moves quickly from introductory to advanced work.

 REQUIREMENTS:

1)   preparation for and participation in each weekly seminar, including short writing assignments (40%). Reading is about 200 pages a week.

2)   the various steps in drafting and revising a 10-12 page research prospectus as described below (60%). The preliminary stages of research entail reading at least 10-15 books, review essays, and articles.

You will meet with me individually to consult on your topic a little over halfway through the semester. Short topic statements and bibliography are due a week later. We will spend the last three weeks of class in editorial session: discussing the structure, prose, style, and subject of each prospectus.

PROSPECTUS

         A prospectus is a “description in advance of a proposed undertaking.” It sets out your topic based on preliminary research. It should identify the problem or event that will be investigated, explain why it is important, survey the historical literature on the subject, describe the primary sources you will use, and discuss how you intend to carry out the work.

 The prospectus is not binding; you will certainly change your topic in some way during your senior year, and you may change it entirely. It is nonetheless very important preparation. It also requires substantial background work. I expect you to have looked at and read in at least 10 books, articles, and review essays.

The prospectus should also include a bibliography and four to six photocopied samples of primary sources. You may discuss the usefulness of the sources in either the text of the prospectus or in notes attached to the copies of the sources.

HIS 383 • Empire And Nation In The City

40575 • Fall 2008
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM GAR 1.122

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

REE 381 • Smnr Rus/E Eur/Eurasn Civ/Cul

45738 • Fall 2008
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200

This is the introductory seminar to Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.  It consists of a series of guest lectures by a   diverse cast of CREEES faculty in order to give the students as  broad an overview of the field as possible.

Prerequisites: graduate standing. 

Readings:  Distributed by visiting lecturers a week before each lecture

Grading:   Participation:             10%

              Oral presentation:       40%

               Final research paper:  50%

HIS 347L • Seminar In Historiography-W

39630 • Spring 2007
Meets T 2:00PM-5:00PM CBA 4.342

SEMINAR IN HISTORIOGRAPHY: HONORS PROGRAM

Open only to students admitted to the History Honors program.

This seminar introduces students to a range of historical methods, topics, and sources, with no claim to being comprehensive. We will consider how “history” has changed along with other forms of knowledge. We will read different kinds of history (social, intellectual, cultural, and so on). We emphasize research with primary sources that students will be able to use in their theses.

Faculty from the Department of History will lead discussions about their areas of expertise, giving the class examples of documents and sources that historians use, or showing how they generate questions for research.  By the end of the semester, each student will have come up with an advisor and a prospectus for the senior thesis she or he will write next year.

This is a reading- and writing-intensive course, and it moves quickly from introductory to advanced work.

 REQUIREMENTS:

1)   preparation for and participation in each weekly seminar, including short writing assignments (40%). Reading is about 200 pages a week.

2)   the various steps in drafting and revising a 10-12 page research prospectus as described below (60%). The preliminary stages of research entail reading at least 10-15 books, review essays, and articles.

You will meet with me individually to consult on your topic a little over halfway through the semester. Short topic statements and bibliography are due a week later. We will spend the last three weeks of class in editorial session: discussing the structure, prose, style, and subject of each prospectus.

PROSPECTUS

         A prospectus is a “description in advance of a proposed undertaking.” It sets out your topic based on preliminary research. It should identify the problem or event that will be investigated, explain why it is important, survey the historical literature on the subject, describe the primary sources you will use, and discuss how you intend to carry out the work.

 The prospectus is not binding; you will certainly change your topic in some way during your senior year, and you may change it entirely. It is nonetheless very important preparation. It also requires substantial background work. I expect you to have looked at and read in at least 10 books, articles, and review essays.

The prospectus should also include a bibliography and four to six photocopied samples of primary sources. You may discuss the usefulness of the sources in either the text of the prospectus or in notes attached to the copies of the sources.

HIS 350L • Women/Gender In East Europe-W

39700 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 554
(also listed as REE 335)

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 383 • Empire/Nation/Ident Mod E Eur

40860 • Fall 2006
Meets TH 3:30PM-6:30PM MEZ 1.104

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

REE 301 • Intro Rus/E Eur/Eurasian Stds

46360 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 420
(also listed as HIS 306N)

Description:

Why did communism collapse? Are we in another Cold War? Is Putin the next Stalin? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these and other key issues, topics, and events that are central to the field of Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies.  It features frequent UT faculty guest speakers from across the university with diverse disciplinary specialities including History, Slavic languages and literature, Anthropology, Geography, Political Science, and Ethnomusicology. The course format consists of lectures, discussion, and frequent interactive, student-driven exercises and projects. This is a core course required for a degree in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and it carries a global studies flag.  

 

Readings Include the Following:

  1. Barbara Engel and Clifford Rosenthal, Five Sisters: Women Against the Tsar.

  2. Bob Weinberg and Laurie Bernstein, Revolutionary Russia: A History in Documents.

  3. Heda Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968.

  4. Thomas Blatt, From the Ashes of Sobibor.

  5. Aleksandar Zograf, Regards from Serbia: A Cartoonist’s Diary of the War in Serbia.

  6. Additional readings will be posted to canvas.

HIS 350L • Ethnic Conflict In Balkans-W

38830 • Spring 2006
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM PAR 302
(also listed as REE 335)

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362G • Balkan History Since 1453-W

38950 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.332
(also listed as REE 335)

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 350L • Minorities In Eastern Europe-W

38652 • Fall 2005
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM UTC 3.120
(also listed as REE 335)

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362G • Eastern Europe In The 20th Cen

38750 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 4.112
(also listed as REE 335)

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 350L • Women/Gender In East Europe-W

35755 • Spring 2003
Meets M 3:00PM-6:00PM CBA 4.338
(also listed as REE 335)

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 362G • Balkan History Since 1453-W

35835 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 5
(also listed as REE 335)

Topics in European History.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HIS 383 • Islam & Europe: Mod Encounters

36475 • Fall 2002
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM GAR 100

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 350L • Women Of Eastern Europe-W

35180 • Spring 2000
Meets T 3:30PM-6:30PM CBA 4.338
(also listed as REE 335)

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

REE 335 • Eastern Europe In The 20th Cen

40215 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GAR 109
(also listed as HIS 366N)

Please check back for updates.

Publications


Balkan Smoke: Tobacco and the Making of Modern Bulgaria

Cornell University Press; November 13, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communism Unwrapped: Consumption in Cold War Eastern Europe

Oxford University Press; September 6, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

The Orient Within: Muslim Minorites and the Negotiation of Nationhood in Modern Bulgaria

Cornell University Press; April 7, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curriculum Vitae


Profile Pages


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