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Kristen A Hogan


Core FacultyPh.D., University of Texas at Austin

Education Coordinator, UT Gender & Sexuality Center
Kristen A Hogan

Contact

Biography


As Education Coordinator at the UT Gender & Sexuality Center: Serving Women & LGBTQA Communities, Kristen creates, coordinates, and facilitates gender justice and LGBTQA+ justice workshops to make the UT Austin campus (and connected spaces in Austin) safer and more welcoming for women and LGBTQA people. Her workshop facilitation practice is informed by her experience with collaborative queer antiracist feminist organizing including practicing women’s and gender studies librarianship at UT Austin, teaching Women’s and Gender Studies at LSU and UT Austin, working at BookWoman in Austin, and co-managing the antiracist, trans-positive Toronto Women’s Bookstore. She is the author of a new book, The Feminist Bookstore Movement: Lesbian Antiracism and Feminist Accountability, Duke University Press, 2016.

Research interests: feminist literary activism; the transnational feminist bookstore movement; queer theory; anti-oppression information systems; critical approaches to women, gender, and human rights as gender, racial, queer, and dis/ability justice.

Courses taught:
WGS301: Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies: Transnational Activism and Women’s Human Rights
WGS356: Introduction to Feminist Research Methods
WGS390: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

WGS335: Confronting LGBTQA+ Oppression (Part 1 of the Peers for Pride Program)
WGS335: LGBTQA+ Oppression: Facilitating Dialogue (Part 2of the Peers for Pride Program)

Courses


WGS 335 • Confronting Lgbtq Oppression

46875 • Fall 2016
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM MEZ 2.102
(also listed as AFR 372D, S W 360K)

Course Description

? This fall course is the first half of the Peers for Pride Program and prepares students  to become peer facilitators of performance-based workshops for LGBTQA+ justice, including racial and gender justice.

? This semester we build a foundational knowledge of LGBTQA+ identities, the intersectional systems of oppression that affect LGBTQA+ people, and community-based  strategies for interrupting these systems of oppression.

? We are also working together to establish our practice of theatre for dialogue, a form  of applied theatre in preparation for your facilitation in the spring. This semester you  will establish your relationship with each other as an ensemble, you will reflect on your role in collaborative facilitation, and you will work together to propose activating scenes to engage audiences in the spring in conversation around LGBTQA+ justice.

? Along the way, you will work to recognize your relationships with student and community organizers also doing this work. You will build skills in intersectional  analysis,  ensemble performance work, community alliances, and critical reflection.

WGS 335 • Lgbtq Oppression: Dialog

46060 • Spring 2016
Meets MF 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 524
(also listed as S W 360K, T D 357T)

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people on the UT campus and beyond face many challenges due to homophobia, heterosexism, biphobia, and transphobia, often in connection with other forms of oppression. Education and awareness are the first steps in combating hate and discrimination. This course is the second part of the “Peers for Pride” facilitation program. In this course students facilitate peer education across campus as, throughout the course, we build on the knowledge and skills developed in the first semester.

WGS 390 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

47250 • Fall 2012
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM UTC 4.114

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the settings and practices determining of Women's and Gender studies in US contexts, and at the University of Texas at Austin. We will start the course by tracing the history of various, mostly Western, feminisms, as they led to the current situation for WGS in higher education and research.  The purpose of this survey is to show how post-World-War-II feminisms and gender studies remain strongly marked by history and conditioned by larger political and social movements. After that, we will move to situating the positions of yourself as professionals and your projects within and outside of the academy.  The positions that you discover will require you to identify not only a set of resources and institutions with which you need to be familiar, but also a set of production skills that you'll need to make an impact or be effective in your engagement.  To that end, you'll be introduced to what resources are available at UT, to research skills you'll need, and to unique library resources. The final major section of the course will be devoted to an introduction to WGS theory -- specifically, to the roots of modern theory in several nineteenth-century, and then to the interdisciplinary uses characterizing today's canon of WGS research and activisms. Offered Fall Semester only.

WGS F340 • Feminist Theories Of Comm Bldg

89200 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTH 2:30PM-4:30PM PAR 105
(also listed as AAS F330, AFR F374D, MAS F374)

Feminist theory grows out of and in connection with feminist activism and visions for a just world. In this class we will build a life practice of reading feminist theories to inform our alliances and actions. You will read key authors and become familiar with groundbreaking concepts from Gloria Anzaldúa’s nepantla to Katherine McKittrick’s demonic grounds, from Audre Lorde’s erotic as power to Jasbir Puar’s queer assemblages. You will also learn to follow developments in feminist theory by understanding how to research trends in feminist theory and by mapping the connections between feminist theory and other critical theories including disability studies and queer theory. This course will focus on U.S. feminisms with particular attention to women of color feminisms. 

Evaluation:

15% Participation, in-class writing, peer feedback

20% Reading Dialogue Journals

10% Mid-Term Sketch of & Reflection on Media or Performance Installation

15% Co-Facilitating Discussion

40% Final Project:

            20% Media or Performance Installation

            20% Written Reflection

Reading List:

  • This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color (2002/1981)
  • Gloria Anzaldúa: Introduction, 1981 lii-lvi (5)
  • Mitsuye Yamada: Asian Pacific American Women and Feminism 74-79 (6)
  • Combahee River Collective: A Black Feminist Statement 234-244 (11)
  • Minnie Bruce Pratt: Yours in Struggle: Three Feminist Perspectives on Anti-Semitism and Racism (1984)
  • Katherine McKittrick: Demonic Grounds (2006)
  • Gloria Anzaldúa: Making Face, Making Soul/Haciendo Caras: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Feminists of Color (1990)
  • Gloria Anzaldúa: This Bridge We Call Home: Radical Visions for Transformation (2002)
  • The Soul of Women’s Lib 26-44 Clare Hemmings: Why Stories Matter: The Political Grammar of Feminist Theory (2011)
  • Miranda Joseph: Against the Romance of Community (2002)
  • Introduction: Geographic Stories ix-xxiv
  • Conclusion: Stay Human 143-146
  • AnaLouise Keating and Gloria González-López: Bridging: How Gloria Anzaldúa’s Life and Work Transformed Our Own (2011)
  • Building Bridges, Transforming Loss, Shaping New Dialogues: Anzaldúan Studies for the Twenty-First Century 1-16
  • Haciendo Caras, Una Entrada xv-xxviii
  • Now Let Us Shift 540-578
  • Kit Yuen Quan: Making Face, Making Soul/Haciendo Caras: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Feminists of Color (1990)
  • The Girl Who Wouldn’t Sing 212-220
  • Kimberly Springer: Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968-1980
  • The Soul of Women’s Lib 1-26
  • Kimberly Springer: Living for the Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations, 1968-1980
  • Epilogue 173-180
  • Gayatri Gopinath: Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures (2005)
  • Impossible Desires: An Introduction 1-28
  • Gayatri Gopinath: Impossible Desires: Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures (2005)
  • Epilogue: Queer Homes in Diaspora 187-194
  • Introduction 1-20
  • Rosemarie Garland-Thomson: Integrating Disability, Transforming Feminist Theory (NWSA 2002)
  • Jasbir Puar: Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times
  • Preface: Tactics, Strategies, Logistics ix-xxviii
  • Audre Lorde: Sister Outsider (1984/2007)
  • Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power 53-59
  • The Uses of Anger: Women Responding to Racism 124-133
  • Introduction: Persistent Critique, Relentless Return vii-xxxvi
  • Epilogue: What Is to Be Done? 170-174

WGS 301 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

46930 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BIO 301
(also listed as AAS 310, AFR 317)

In this course, you will:

? become familiar with key terms within and authors of feminist analysis

? use WGS terms and concepts to analyze texts (archives, films, a novel, a public event)

? think for yourself and put your life and surroundings in conversation with our readings

? practice looking for and learning from transnational grassroots feminist activists

? journal about change and challenges created by a human rights framework for gender justice

? take part in our ongoing discussion about what WGS is and what possibilities it creates

WGS 390 • Fndtn I: Intro Wom'S/Gend Stds

47110 • Fall 2011
Meets W 3:00PM-6:00PM CAL 221

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the settings and practices determining of Women's and Gender studies in US contexts, and at the University of Texas at Austin. We will start the course by tracing the history of various, mostly Western, feminisms, as they led to the current situation for WGS in higher education and research.  The purpose of this survey is to show how post-World-War-II feminisms and gender studies remain strongly marked by history and conditioned by larger political and social movements. After that, we will move to situating the positions of yourself as professionals and your projects within and outside of the academy.  The positions that you discover will require you to identify not only a set of resources and institutions with which you need to be familiar, but also a set of production skills that you'll need to make an impact or be effective in your engagement.  To that end, you'll be introduced to what resources are available at UT, to research skills you'll need, and to unique library resources. The final major section of the course will be devoted to an introduction to WGS theory -- specifically, to the roots of modern theory in several nineteenth-century, and then to the interdisciplinary uses characterizing today's canon of WGS research and activisms. Offered Fall Semester only.

WGS 356 • Intro To Feminist Rsch Methods

47805 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A203A

Because gender, sexuality, and the lives of marginalized peoples have historically been obscured by traditional archives/ists, colonized by traditional research practices, and condescended to by disembodied researchers, a key project of women’s and gender studies has been to develop new archives, methods of research, and a lively discussion about the responsibility of researchers to our collaborators. In this course we will ask how feminism has restructured research. This course will prepare you to formulate a research prospectus and a methodology in order to undertake an article, conference paper, undergraduate thesis, or other similar project. In the process, we will examine various feminist research methods, question their assumptions, and practice articulating our relationships, as researchers, to these methods as well as to our projects. Through readings, field trips, and panels of UT-based researchers, we will become familiar with our local university and community resources and will learn about research methods including archival research, case studies, textual analysis, oral history, ethnography, digital resources, and activist research.

AFR 317E • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

35272 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A203A

Please check back for updates.

WGS 356 • Intro To Feminist Rsch Methods

48040 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 0.128

Course Number: WGS 356 (not UGS 356)
Title: Introduction to Feminist Research Methods
Semester: Spring 2009

Instructor: Kristen Hogan

Description:
Because gender, sexuality, and the lives of marginalized peoples have historically been obscured by traditional archives/ists, colonized by traditional research practices, and condescended to by disembodied researchers, a key project of women’s and gender studies has been to develop new archives, methods of research, and a lively discussion about the responsibility of researchers to our collaborators. In this course we will ask how feminism has restructured research. This course will prepare you to formulate a research prospectus and a methodology in order to undertake an article, conference paper, undergraduate thesis, or other similar project. In the process, we will examine various feminist research methods, question their assumptions, and practice articulating our relationships, as researchers, to these methods as well as to our projects. Through readings, field trips, and panels of UT-based researchers, we will become familiar with our local university and community resources and will learn about research methods including archival research, case studies, textual analysis, oral history, ethnography, digital resources, and activist research.

Readings: (subject to change)
Alison M. Jaggar, ed. Just Methods: An Interdisciplinary Feminist Reader. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers, 2008.
Linda Tuhiwai Smith. Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. London: Zed Books, 1999. (New York: St. Martin’s Press)
Shulamit Reinharz. Feminist Methods in Social Research. New York: Oxford UP, 1992.
Course Packet.

Evaluation: (subject to change)
10% 2-3-page Response to readings on feminist research ethics
15% 2-3-page Methodology review of a feminist article appearing in a journal in your field
15% 3-5-page Research proposal, including discussion of appropriate feminist methodologies
30% Completion and presentation of 10-15 item annotated bibliography (including methodological models) with revised and expanded 5-7-page research prospectus
15% Group facilitation of one class discussion (be a curious feminist)
15% Attendance & Participation








_____________________________________________
Gretchen Ritter, Director, Women’s & Gender Studies

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    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765