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Simone A. Browne


Core FacultyPh.D., University of Toronto

Associate Professor
Simone A. Browne

Contact

Interests


Surveillance, Social Media, Social Network Sites, and Black Diaspora Studies

Biography


Simone Browne began her faculty position in the Department of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin in 2007. She is Associate Professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. She teaches and researches surveillance studies and black diaspora studies.

Her first book, Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness, examines surveillance with a focus on transatlantic slavery, biometric technologies, branding, airports and creative texts.

Winner of the 2016 Best Book Prize, Surveillance Studies Network

Winner of the 2015 Lora Romero First Book Prize, American Studies Association

Winner of the 2015 Donald McGannon Award for Social and Ethical Relevance in Communications Technology Research

You can read the Introduction to Dark Matters here.

She is an Executive Board member of HASTAC. She is also a member of Deep Lab, a feminist collaborative composed of artists, engineers, hackers, writers, and theorists.

Currently reading Spatializing Blackness: Architectures of Confinement and Black Masculinity in Chicago by Rashad Shabazz (link)


 

Courses


WGS 322 • Race/Gender/Surveillance

46810 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)

Drawing from social science readings, science fiction (Gattaca, THX-1138, Ex-Machina, Grounded), documentaries, and popular media (24, South Park, Orange is the New Black, The Bachelor, Cheaters), this course introduces students to the emerging field of Surveillance Studies.

We examine: slavery, reality TV, sports, Google, trolling + social media, borders, airports, biometric technology, whistleblowers, drones, wearables + fashion, among other topics.

Assignments: Film Review, In-class Quizzes, Current Event Analysis, Take-Home Final Exam, and Research Teams produce a digital magazine on “Surveillance”. This course is cross-listed with Women and Gender Studies, and Sociology. Cultural Diversity Flag. Ethics and Leadership Flag.

WGS 322 • Race/Gender/Surveillance

46845 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)

Race, Gender and Surveillance will provide an overview of theories in the emerging field of Surveillance Studies, with a focus on race and gender. We will examine transformations in social control and the distributions of power in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. As such, this is a Black Studies course. Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons and punishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television; social media; sports; airports; biometrics and drones. Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytical skills. Through the use of films, videos and other visual media students will be challenged to better understand how surveillance practices inform modern life. 

Required Texts:

John Gilliom and Torin Monahan. 2013. SuperVision: An Introduction to the Surveillance Society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Dave Eggers. 2013. The Circle. New York: Random House

A course packet of all other required readings will be available for purchase at Speedway Printers. 

Grading Breakdown:

  • Participation, In-class Assignments and Quizzes: 10%
  • Film Review 10%
  • Mid-Term Test: 25%
  • Current Event Analysis: 10%
  • Research Project: 20%
  • Final Test: 25%

AFR 322D • Race And The Digital

29340 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 1.404

In this interdisciplinary course students will examine race and digital technologies. Attention will be placed on forms of popular culture, social media, black cultural production and political action. Students will become more skilled in written communication and expression, reading, critical thinking, oral expression, and visual expression. Students will create and host a Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon, produce sound autobiographies using SoundCloud, annotate text using hypothes.is, and create web-ready research essays to be published online using ReadyMag.

WGS 393 • Race And The Body

46390 • Spring 2016
Meets W 2:30PM-5:30PM GWB 1.130
(also listed as AFR 381, MAS 392, SOC 395L)

Course Description

This course will engage with theories and research methodologies in the sociological study of the body, with a focus on race, racism, gender and sexualities. Emphasis will be placed on close reading of the assigned texts so that discussion can focus on key issues and debates concerning the body in contemporary society, including: the role of space and location; theories of the subject and the meaning of subjectivity; state formation and social control. Objectives

Through the completion of written assignments and active seminar participation and preparation, students will develop an understanding of the language and conceptual tools necessary to interrogate the practices through which we come to be variously raced, gendered and abled. Students will be encouraged to raise their research concerns in the seminar and we will actively contribute to each other’s questions of interest and research design.

 

WGS 322 • Race/Gender/Surveillance

46005 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)

Race, Gender and Surveillance will provide an overview of theories in the emerging field of Surveillance Studies, with a focus on race and gender. We will examine transformations in social control and the distributions of power in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. As such, this is a Black Studies course. Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons and punishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television; social media; sports; airports; biometrics and drones. Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytical skills. Through the use of films, videos and other visual media students will be challenged to better understand how surveillance practices inform modern life. 

Required Texts:

John Gilliom and Torin Monahan. 2013. SuperVision: An Introduction to the Surveillance Society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Dave Eggers. 2013. The Circle. New York: Random House

A course packet of all other required readings will be available for purchase at Speedway Printers. 

Grading Breakdown:

Participation, In-class Assignments and Quizzes: 10%

Film Review 10%

Mid-Term Test: 25%

Current Event Analysis: 10%

Research Project: 20%

Final Test: 25%

AFR 376 • Senior Seminar

29844 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM GWB 1.130

A capstone course fpr AFR majors focusing on black intellectual traditions.

WGS 322 • Race And The Digital

46550 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM CLA 1.404
(also listed as AFR 322D, SOC 322D)

Review of theoretical developments in the sociological study of "race," including an examination of processes of racialization and cultural texts, in order to better understand the ways in which identities are socially produced. Attention will be placed on forms of popular culture, black cultural production, and political action to question how such practices are shaped by migrations within the African diaspora.

WGS 322 • Race/Gender/Surveillance

47755 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)

Descripton:

This course will provide an overview of theories in the emerging field of Surveillance Studies, with afocus on race and gender. We will examine transformations in social control and the distributions ofpower in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. As such,this is a Black Studies course. Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons andpunishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television watching; social media; travel and stateborders; biometrics and the body.

Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytical skills. Through the use of filmsand other visual media students will be challenged to better understand how surveillance practicesinform modern life.

Your participation grade will be based upon your informed participation and not solely on yourattendance. You are expected to contribute informed opinions based on a close reading of the coursematerials and engagement with the themes of the course. Sharing your personal opinions, whileimportant, will not solely constitute informed discussion.

Students who acquire six or more unexcused absences will receive a failing grade.

Grading:

A: 100-94

A-: 93-90

B+: 89-88

B: 87-83

B-: 82-80

C+ 79-78

C: 77-73

C-: 72-70

D+: 69-68

D: 67-63

D-: 62-60

F: 59-0

Your grade in this course will be based on:

Participation, Attendance &In-class Assignments 10%

Everyday Surveillance Assignment 15%

Film Review 15%

Mid-Term Test: 20%

Social Media Project: 20%

Final Test 20%

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the above rubric. To ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

Attendance and Informed Participation

Students who acquire six or more unexcused absences will receive a failing grade.

Please note that this is an upper level undergraduate seminar and your success in this course depends on close reading and engagement with the texts (readings, films, audio recordings, videoclips, video games and weblinks posted to Blackboard), as well as active participation in class discussions. You will be responsible for checking the Blackboard course site regularly for additional texts and announcements.

Class participation will be based on attendance and meaningful participation in class discussions.

Meaningful participation is taken to be analytic engagement with the texts, not vague commentary or generalizations. You are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the readings.

Over the course of the semester you will be ask to respond, in writing, to texts discussed during the lecture.

These assignments will form a part of your participation grade.

WGS 393 • Race And The Body

48070 • Fall 2014
Meets T 12:00PM-3:00PM JES A230
(also listed as AFR 381, SOC 395L)

Course Description

This course will engage with theories and research methodologies in the sociological study of the body, with a focus on race, racism, gender and sexualities. Emphasis will be placed on close reading of the assigned texts so that discussion can focus on key issues and debates concerning the body in contemporary society, including: the role of space and location; theories of the subject and the meaning of subjectivity; state formation and social control. Objectives

Through the completion of written assignments and active seminar participation and preparation, students will develop an understanding of the language and conceptual tools necessary to interrogate the practices through which we come to be variously raced, gendered and abled. Students will be encouraged to raise their research concerns in the seminar and we will actively contribute to each other’s questions of interest and research design.

 

WGS 322 • Race, Culture, And Migration

47950 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.118
(also listed as AFR 374E, SOC 321K)

This course will provide an overview of theories in the emerging field of Surveillance Studies, with a focus on race, gender, power. We will examine transformations in social control and the distributions of power in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. As such, this is a Black Studies course.

Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons and punishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television watching; the Internet; airports and state borders; biometrics and the body.

WGS 322 • Race, Gender, And Surveillance

47955 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.130
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)

Descripton:

This course will provide an overview of theories in the emerging field of Surveillance Studies, with afocus on race and gender. We will examine transformations in social control and the distributions ofpower in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. As such,this is a Black Studies course. Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons andpunishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television watching; social media; travel and stateborders; biometrics and the body.

Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytical skills. Through the use of filmsand other visual media students will be challenged to better understand how surveillance practicesinform modern life.

Your participation grade will be based upon your informed participation and not solely on yourattendance. You are expected to contribute informed opinions based on a close reading of the coursematerials and engagement with the themes of the course. Sharing your personal opinions, whileimportant, will not solely constitute informed discussion.

Students who acquire six or more unexcused absences will receive a failing grade.

Grading:

A: 100-94

A-: 93-90

B+: 89-88

B: 87-83

B-: 82-80

C+ 79-78

C: 77-73

C-: 72-70

D+: 69-68

D: 67-63

D-: 62-60

F: 59-0

Your grade in this course will be based on:

Participation, Attendance &In-class Assignments 10%

Everyday Surveillance Assignment 15%

Film Review 15%

Mid-Term Test: 20%

Social Media Project: 20%

Final Test 20%

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the above rubric. To ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

Attendance and Informed Participation

Students who acquire six or more unexcused absences will receive a failing grade.

Please note that this is an upper level undergraduate seminar and your success in this course depends on close reading and engagement with the texts (readings, films, audio recordings, videoclips, video games and weblinks posted to Blackboard), as well as active participation in class discussions. You will be responsible for checking the Blackboard course site regularly for additional texts and announcements.

Class participation will be based on attendance and meaningful participation in class discussions.

Meaningful participation is taken to be analytic engagement with the texts, not vague commentary or generalizations. You are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the readings.

Over the course of the semester you will be ask to respond, in writing, to texts discussed during the lecture.

These assignments will form a part of your participation grade.

WGS 322 • Race, Gender, And Surveillance

47730 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)

This course will provide an overview of theories in the emerging field of Surveillance Studies, with afocus on race and gender. We will examine transformations in social control and the distributions ofpower in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. As such,this is a Black Studies course. Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons andpunishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television watching; social media; travel and stateborders; biometrics and the body.

Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytical skills. Through the use of filmsand other visual media students will be challenged to better understand how surveillance practicesinform modern life.

Your participation grade will be based upon your informed participation and not solely on yourattendance. You are expected to contribute informed opinions based on a close reading of the coursematerials and engagement with the themes of the course. Sharing your personal opinions, whileimportant, will not solely constitute informed discussion.

Students who acquire six or more unexcused absences will receive a failing grade.

GRADING SCHEME

A: 100-94

A-: 93-90

B+: 89-88

B: 87-83

B-: 82-80

C+ 79-78

C: 77-73

C-: 72-70

D+: 69-68

D: 67-63

D-: 62-60

F: 59-0

Your grade in this course will be based on:

Participation, Attendance &In-class Assignments 10%

Everyday Surveillance Assignment 15%

Film Review 15%

Mid-Term Test: 20%

Social Media Project: 20%

Final Test 20%

Final grades will be determined on the basis of the above rubric. To ensure fairness, all numbers are absolute, and will not be rounded up or down at any stage. Thus a B- will be inclusive of all scores of 80.000 through 83.999. The University does not recognize the grade of A+.

Attendance and Informed Participation

Students who acquire six or more unexcused absences will receive a failing grade.

Please note that this is an upper level undergraduate seminar and your success in this course depends on close reading and engagement with the texts (readings, films, audio recordings, videoclips, video games and weblinks posted to Blackboard), as well as active participation in class discussions. You will be responsible for checking the Blackboard course site regularly for additional texts and announcements.

Class participation will be based on attendance and meaningful participation in class discussions.

Meaningful participation is taken to be analytic engagement with the texts, not vague commentary or generalizations. You are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the readings.

Over the course of the semester you will be ask to respond, in writing, to texts discussed during the lecture.

These assignments will form a part of your participation grade.

WGS 393 • Race And The Body

48070 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 12:00PM-3:00PM CLA 3.106
(also listed as AFR 381, SOC 395L)

Course Description

This course will engage with theories and research methodologies in the sociological study of the body, with a focus on race, racism, gender and sexualities. Emphasis will be placed on close reading of the assigned texts so that discussion can focus on key issues and debates concerning the body in contemporary society, including: the role of space and location; theories of the subject and the meaning of subjectivity; state formation and social control. Objectives

Through the completion of written assignments and active seminar participation and preparation, students will develop an understanding of the language and conceptual tools necessary to interrogate the practices through which we come to be variously raced, gendered and abled. Students will be encouraged to raise their research concerns in the seminar and we will actively contribute to each other’s questions of interest and research design.

 

WGS 322 • Race, Culture, And Migration

47250 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CLA 0.120
(also listed as AFR 374E, SOC 321K)

Note:  322V and SOC 321K Surveillance and Social Control cannot both be countes.

This course will provide an overview of theories in the emerging field of Surveillance Studies, with a focus on race, gender, power. We will examine transformations in social control and the distributions of power in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. As such, this is a Black Studies course.

Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons and punishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television watching; the Internet; airports and state borders; biometrics and the body.

Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytical skills. Through the use of films, the Internet and other visual media, students will be challenged to better understand how surveillance practices inform modern life.

Students who acquire six or more unexcused absences will receive a failing grade.

Your participation grade will be based upon your informed participation and not solely on your attendance. You are expected to contribute informed opinions based on a close reading of the assigned materials and engagement with the themes of the course. Sharing your personal opinions, while important, will not solely constitute informed discussion.

Required Texts:

Christian Parenti. 2003. The Soft Cage: Surveillance in America From Slave Passes to the War on Terror. New York: Basic Books.

All other required readings will be available for purchase as a course kit.

Grading Policy:

Participation and Journal:       20%

Mid-Term Test:                     25%

Research Project:                  20%

Film Review                          15%

Final Test:                           20%

WGS 322 • Race, Gender, And Surveillance

47255 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM CLA 0.102
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)

Course Description

This course is focused on mobility, with immigration being only one such form of movement. We will examine the notion of 'mobility' by exploring historical and contemporary movements of people, capital and ideas. We will review theoretical developments in the sociological study of 'race', examine processes of racialization and cultural texts to better understand the ways in which identities are socially produced. Throughout, attention will be placed on forms of black cultural production and political action to question how such practices are shaped by migrations within the African diaspora.

Grading Policy

Midterm (definitions and essay) 20%

Class participation 10%

Two case studies 20%

Abstract (250 words) with bibliography 10%

Essay (10-12 pages) 30%

Group presentation 10%

Texts

The required text will be a packet of articles. Exerpts will be taken from the following books:

Les Back and John Solomos, editors, Theories of Race and Racism: A Reader, Routledge Readers in Sociology, London: Routledge, 2000

Vivien Burr, An Introduction to Social Construction, London: Routledge, 1995

Stuart Hall, editor, Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices, London: Sage Publications, 1997

Barnor Hesse, editor, Un/settled Multiculturalism: Diasporas, Entanglements, Transruptions,London: Zed Books, 2000

Kamari Maxine Clarke and Deborah A. Thomas, editors, Globalization and Race: Transformations in the Cultural Production of Blackness, Durham: Duke University Press, 2006

Katherine McKittrick, Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2006

Michael Parenti, The Soft Cage: Surveillance in America from Slave Passes to the War on Terror, New York: Basic Books, 2003

Rinaldo Walcott, Black Like Who? Writing Black Canada, Toronto: Insomniac Press, 2003

Howard Winant, The New Politics of Race: Globalism, Difference, Justice, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004

 

WGS 322 • Race, Gender, And Surveillance

47045 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 130
(also listed as AFR 372C, SOC 322V)

Cross listed with AFR 374/WGS 322

Note:  322V and SOC 321K Surveillance and Social Control cannot both be countes.

This course will provide an overview of theories in the emerging field of Surveillance Studies, with a focus on race, gender, power. We will examine transformations in social control and the distributions of power in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. As such, this is a Black Studies course.

Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons and punishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television watching; the Internet; airports and state borders; biometrics and the body.

Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytical skills. Through the use of films, the Internet and other visual media, students will be challenged to better understand how surveillance practices inform modern life.

Students who acquire six or more unexcused absences will receive a failing grade.

Your participation grade will be based upon your informed participation and not solely on your attendance. You are expected to contribute informed opinions based on a close reading of the assigned materials and engagement with the themes of the course. Sharing your personal opinions, while important, will not solely constitute informed discussion.

Required Texts:

Christian Parenti. 2003. The Soft Cage: Surveillance in America From Slave Passes to the War on Terror. New York: Basic Books.

All other required readings will be available for purchase as a course kit.

Grading Policy:

Participation and Journal:       20%

Mid-Term Test:                     25%

Research Project:                   20%

Film Review                           15%

Final Test:                             20%

WGS 393 • Race And The Body

47320 • Fall 2012
Meets TH 12:00PM-3:00PM BUR 214
(also listed as AFR 381, SOC 395L)

Course Description

This course will engage with theories and research methodologies in the sociological study of the body, with a focus on race, racism, gender and sexualities. Emphasis will be placed on close reading of the assigned texts so that discussion can focus on key issues and debates concerning the body in contemporary society, including: the role of space and location; theories of the subject and the meaning of subjectivity; state formation and social control. Objectives

Through the completion of written assignments and active seminar participation and preparation, students will develop an understanding of the language and conceptual tools necessary to interrogate the practices through which we come to be variously raced, gendered and abled. Students will be encouraged to raise their research concerns in the seminar and we will actively contribute to each other’s questions of interest and research design.Grading and Requirements

 

WGS 322 • Race, Culture, And Migration

46973 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 231
(also listed as AFR 374E, SOC 321K)

Contains a Writing Flag

Course Description

This course is focused on mobility, with immigration being only one such form of movement. We will examine the notion of 'mobility' by exploring historical and contemporary movements of people, capital and ideas. We will review theoretical developments in the sociological study of 'race', examine processes of racialization and cultural texts to better understand the ways in which identities are socially produced. Throughout, attention will be placed on forms of black cultural production and political action to question how such practices are shaped by migrations within the African diaspora.

Grading Policy

Midterm (definitions and essay) 20%

Class participation 10%

Two case studies 20%

Abstract (250 words) with bibliography 10%

Essay (10-12 pages) 30%

Group presentation 10%

Texts

The required text will be a packet of articles. Exerpts will be taken from the following books:

Les Back and John Solomos, editors, Theories of Race and Racism: A Reader, Routledge Readers in Sociology, London: Routledge, 2000

Vivien Burr, An Introduction to Social Construction, London: Routledge, 1995

Stuart Hall, editor, Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices, London: Sage Publications, 1997

Barnor Hesse, editor, Un/settled Multiculturalism: Diasporas, Entanglements, Transruptions,London: Zed Books, 2000

Kamari Maxine Clarke and Deborah A. Thomas, editors, Globalization and Race: Transformations in the Cultural Production of Blackness, Durham: Duke University Press, 2006

Katherine McKittrick, Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2006

Michael Parenti, The Soft Cage: Surveillance in America from Slave Passes to the War on Terror, New York: Basic Books, 2003

Rinaldo Walcott, Black Like Who? Writing Black Canada, Toronto: Insomniac Press, 2003

Howard Winant, The New Politics of Race: Globalism, Difference, Justice, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004

 

AFR 374D • The Wire: Inequality/City Life

30264 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BUR 214
(also listed as SOC 321K)

Cross-listed with AFR

Description

In this course the television series The Wire serves as an entry point from which students will engage sociological theory and writings on city life. We will examine the interlocking workings of race, gender, schooling, economic restructuring, surveillance, policing and incarceration in the making of socio-spatial inequalities. Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading, viewing and analytical skills. Throughout the course we will question how popular and visual texts shape perceptions of urban inequalities.

Students are expected to work with peers on in-class and on-line writing activities, lead class discussions and offer informed opinions based on a close reading of the course materials and engagement with the themes of the course.

This course meets the Writing Flag Requirement.

Grading Policy

 Final Essay 40%

 Book Review 20%

 Episode Critical Analysis (2 -10% each) 20%

 Discussion Leader 0%

 Article Reflecrtion (2-10% each) 20%

 

 

 

WGS 393 • Race And The Body

47175 • Fall 2011
Meets TH 12:00PM-3:00PM BUR 214
(also listed as SOC 395L)

Description

This course will engage with theories and research methodologies in the sociological study of the body, with a focus on race, racism, gender and sexualities. Emphasis will be placed on close reading of the assigned texts so that discussion can focus on key issues and debates concerning the body in contemporary society, including: the role of space and location; theories of the subject and the meaning of subjectivity; state formation and social control.

Objectives

Through the completion of written assignments and active seminar participation and preparation, students will develop an understanding of the language and conceptual tools necessary to interrogate the practices through which we come to be variously raced, gendered and abled. Students will be encouraged to raise their research concerns in the seminar and we will actively contribute to each other’s questions of interest and research design.

 Assignments

Book Review 25%

Mid-Term Paper 25%

Final Research Paper and Symposium Presentation 50%

Required Texts (please consult official syllabus before purchasing books)

Nirmal Puwar. 2008. Space Invaders: Race, Gender and Bodies Out of Place. London: Berg.

Orlando Patterson. 1998. Rituals of Blood: Consequences of Slavery in Two American Centuries. New York: Basic Books.

Ruth Frankenburg. 1993. White Women, Race Matters: The Social Construction of Whiteness. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Ruth Wilson. 2007. Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California. Los Angeles: University of California Press.

Ben Carrington. 2010. Race, Sport and Politics: The Sporting Black Diaspora. London: Sage Publications Ltd.

 

Gargi Bhattacharyya. 1998. Tales of Dark-skinned Women: Race, Gender and Global Culture. London: Routledge.

Patricia Hill Collins. 2005. Black Sexual Politics: African-Americans, Gender and the New Racism. New York: Routledge.

Sara Ahmed. 2010. The Promise of Happiness. Durham: Duke University Press.

Katherine McKittrick. 2006. Demonic Grounds: Black Women and The Cartographies of Struggle. Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press.

Jasbir Puar. 2008. Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times. Durham: Duke University Press

AFR 374E • Surveillance & Social Control

30561 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BUR 136

Please check back for updates.

WGS 322 • Race, Culture, And Migration

47600 • Spring 2011
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BUR 231
(also listed as AFR 374E, SOC 321K)

Cross listed with AFR 374E/WGS 322

 

Contains a Writing Flag

Course Description

This course is focused on mobility, with immigration being only one such form of movement. We will examine the notion of 'mobility' by exploring historical and contemporary movements of people, capital and ideas. We will review theoretical developments in the sociological study of 'race', examine processes of racialization and cultural texts to better understand the ways in which identities are socially produced. Throughout, attention will be placed on forms of black cultural production and political action to question how such practices are shaped by migrations within the African diaspora.

Grading Policy

Midterm (definitions and essay) 20%?Class participation 10%?Two case studies 20%?Abstract (250 words) with bibliography 10%?Essay (10-12 pages) 30%?Group presentation 10%

Texts

The required text will be a packet of articles. Exerpts will be taken from the following books:

Les Back and John Solomos, editors, Theories of Race and Racism: A Reader, Routledge Readers in Sociology, London: Routledge, 2000?Vivien Burr, An Introduction to Social Construction, London: Routledge, 1995 ?Stuart Hall, editor, Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices, London: Sage Publications, 1997?Barnor Hesse, editor, Un/settled Multiculturalism: Diasporas, Entanglements, Transruptions, London: Zed Books, 2000?Kamari Maxine Clarke and Deborah A. Thomas, editors, Globalization and Race: Transformations in the Cultural Production of Blackness, Durham: Duke University Press, 2006?Katherine McKittrick, Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2006?Michael Parenti, The Soft Cage: Surveillance in America from Slave Passes to the War on Terror, New York: Basic Books, 2003 ?Rinaldo Walcott, Black Like Who? Writing Black Canada, Toronto: Insomniac Press, 2003?Howard Winant, The New Politics of Race: Globalism, Difference, Justice, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004

 

 

WGS 322 • Surveillance & Social Control

47050 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 4.124
(also listed as AFR 374E, SOC 321K)

SURVEILLANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL
           SOC 321K/AFR 374E/WGS 322
Fall 2010
Instructor: Simone Browne

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will provide an overview of theories in surveillance studies, with a focus on race, gender, power, ethics and surveillance. We will examine historical transformations in social control and the distributions of power in U.S. and global contexts, with a focus on populations within the African diaspora. Course topics include: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade; prisons and punishment; the gaze, voyeurism and reality television watching; the Internet; travel and state borders; biometrics and the body.

Students will be encouraged to develop critical reading and analytical skills. Through the use of films, the Internet and other visual media, students will be challenged to better understand how surveillance practices inform modern life.

Your participation grade will be based upon your informed participation and not solely on your attendance. You are expected to contribute informed opinions based on a close reading of the course materials and engagement with the themes of the course. Sharing your personal opinions, while important, will not solely constitute informed discussion.

This course is cross-listed with African and African American Studies and Women and Gender Studies.


Possible Texts:

Shoshana Magnet and Kelly Gates (eds.). 2009. The New Media of Surveillance. New York: Routledge

All other required readings can be downloaded from the course Blackboard site or accessed through the UT Libraries e-reserve system.



AFR 374E • Race, Culture, And Migration-W

35800 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BUR 231

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374E • Surveillance & Social Control

35805 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BUR 130

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374E • Race, Culture, And Migration-W

35030 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM RLM 6.116

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374E • Race, Culture, And Migration-W

36025 • Fall 2008
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BUR 231

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374E • Race, Culture, And Migration-W

35839 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM BUR 216

Please check back for updates.

AFR 374E • Race, Culture, And Migration

36527 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 420

Please check back for updates.

Select Publications


Books


Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness

Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness

Simone Browne

Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness
Duke University Press (2015)

You can read the Introduction to Dark Matters here

Peer-Reviewed Articles


Browne, S. "Everybody’s Got a Little Light Under the Sun: Black Luminosity and the Visual Culture of Surveillance." Cultural Studies 26(4), 2012: 542-564.


Browne, S. “Digital Epidermalization: Race, Identity and Biometrics." Critical Sociology 36(1), 2010: 131-150.


Browne, S. “Getting Carded: Border Control and the Politics of Canada’s Permanent Resident Card." Citizenship Studies 9(4), 2005: 423-438.


Browne, S. “Of ‘Passport Babies’ and ‘Border Control’: The Case of Mavis Baker v. Minister ofCitizenship and Immigration