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Sharon L. Strover


Associate FacultyPh. D., Stanford University

Professor in the Department of Radio Television Film, Moody College of Communication

Contact

Interests


communications and telecommunications, including communication theory, research methodology and telecommunications policy

Biography


E-mail: sstrover@mail.utexas.edu
Office: CMA 6.118C
Phone: 512-471-6652
Ph.D., Stanford University, 1982.

Dr. Strover teaches and researches various topics related to communications and telecommunications, including communication theory, research methodology and telecommunications policy, in the College of Communication at the University of Texas. She also directs the Telecommunications and Information Policy Institute there. One of her latest projects at the Institute is heading up the national Telecommunications Panel for the Rural Policy Institute, a national, multi-university think tank devoted to rural issues. The Panel will work on various national rural telecommunications policy issues.

Current research projects have included examinations of broadband competition in three states, local telecommunications efforts and community networking, video game content and implications for learning, telecommunications networks and policies in the Appalachian region for the Appalachian Regional Commission, modeling telecommunications infrastructure in rural regions, and an investigation of state and local telecommunications policies. Some of this year’s articles appear in The Information Society (Fall, 2003), Javnost The Public (on digital television policy), and Government Information Quarterly (on broadband deployment).

Dr. Strover has worked with the U.S. Federal Communication Commission on technology needs and state and local telecommunications applications, participated in Advisory panels for the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment and the Federal Trade Commission, and was subcommittee chair for the State of Texas’ investigation of the US-Mexico Free Trade agreement (later NAFTA). The recipient of numerous grants and contracts in the telecommunications field, she has worked with several foundations and state agencies around the country on networking and telecommunications policy issues. Dr. Strover co-directed a three-year Ford Foundation study of telecommunications and rural areas and collaborated on the book Electronic Byways, examining state telecommunications applications and policy. She also has co-edited two other books examining telecommunications in urban and rural areas. She currently sits on the editorial boards of four journals. In addition, Dr. Strover was a member of the Network Policy and Planning Advisory Council for the University Corporation on Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), and a member of the steering committee for the annual Telecommunications Policy Research Conference. The National Research Council also enlisted her help as a member of their Digital Divide panel in 2000. She was elected Mass Communication Division Chair 1999-2001 the International Communication Association, for a major professional organization in the field of communications.

At the University of Texas, she has held a various administrative posts. She has been the Department’s Graduate Advisor for three years, a member of the Women’s Studies Steering Committee for three years, chaired or been a member of several University committees as well as the elected University Faculty Council, and directed the University’s Office of Survey Research. She is the first Director of the University’s Telecommunications and Information Policy Institute, which undertakes research projects, sponsors conferences and publications, and is developing a curriculum concentration in telecommunications. She currently serves as Chair of the Department of Radio-Television-Film. Strover received the University’s Outstanding Graduate Teaching Award for 1999. Dr. Strover received her Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Courses


AMS 391 • Technology And Culture

30240 • Spring 2015
Meets M 9:00AM-12:00PM CMA 3.134

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

RTF 393N • Comm, Technology And Culture

08810 • Spring 2013
Meets W 9:00AM-12:00PM CMA A3.108
(also listed as AMS 391)

In this course we will examine several influential books that address the interplay of media systems, technologies and society. The class does not have a single theme or one overarching question. Rather, the material we'll read during the term has been selected because it raises issues concerning the social context for which media, old and new, have defining powers. Our simplest goals will be to understand alternative conceptions of how technology is viewed, including its supposed "impacts" on society, its role in creating and shaping broad media systems and the attendant cultural reverberations. Theories of society are foregrounded in some of the readings, and occupy central positions in other work even though they may be more implicit than explicit. Our point of departure is that one cannot meaningfully discuss media systems without acknowledging the social context in which they reside, originate, function and evolve. Culture and cultural issues are defined and explored broadly as encompassing the common practices and rituals of everyday life as well as the long-standing patterns and values that characterize American society. The ways in which media systems or technologies are synonymous with modernity will be directly addressed in many of our readings. The social construction of technology, technological determinism, actor-network theory and the political economy of communication will be among some of the theoretical approaches we will consider.

RTF 393N • Technology And Culture

08503 • Fall 2010
Meets TH 9:30AM-12:30PM CMA A3.108
(also listed as AMS 391)

Description
In this course we will examine several influential books that address the interplay of media systems, technologies and society.  The class does not have a single theme or one overarching question.  Rather, the material we’ll read during the term has been selected because it raises issues concerning the social context for which media, old and new, have defining powers.  Our simplest goals will be to understand alternative conceptions of how technology is viewed, including its supposed “impacts” on society, its role in creating and shaping broad media systems and the attendant cultural reverberations.  Theories of society are foregrounded in some of the readings, and occupy central positions in other work even though they may be more implicit than explicit. Our point of departure is that one cannot meaningfully discuss media systems without acknowledging the social context in which they reside, originate, function and evolve.  Culture and cultural issues are defined and explored broadly as encompassing the common practices and rituals of everyday life as well as the long-standing patterns and values that characterize American society.  The ways in which media systems or technologies are synonymous with modernity will be directly addressed in many of our readings.  The social construction of technology, technological determinism, actor-network theory and the political economy of communication will be among some of the theoretical approaches we will consider.  

 

AMS 391 • Technology And Culture

26340 • Spring 2004
Meets W 12:00PM-3:00PM CMA A3.128

Graduate standing required. Permission from instructor required.

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    The University of Texas at Austin
    Burdine Hall 536
    2505 University Avenue, A4900
    Austin, Texas 78712
    512-471-5765