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Thomas K Hubbard


Associate FacultyPhD; 1980, Yale

Professor in the Department of Classics
Thomas K Hubbard

Contact

Interests


Greek and Roman Literature, Literary Theory

Biography


College: Liberal Arts

Home Department: Classics

Education: PhD,

Research interests:Greek and Roman Literature, Literary Theory.

FieldGreco-Roman literature and gender studies.

Courses taught:
WGS 340 HOMOSEXUALITY IN ANTIQUITY, WGS 340 HOMOSEXUALITY, RENAIS
-1933

AwardsMartin Kellogg Fellowship in Classical Languages and Literatures (1979-80). Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the School of Criticism and Theory, Northwestern University (Summer 1981).  National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar Fellowship, Harvard University- ''The Ancient Greek Concept of Myth and Contemporary Theory''andnbsp; (Summer 1984). National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for University Teachers, and Visiting Fellow, Cornell University (1987-8). Rachel and Ben Vaughan Fellowship in Classics (1988-9). University Research Institute Summer Fellowship (Summer 1989). National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Fellowship (Summer 1992).  Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, Free University of Berlin (1995-96). University of Texas Faculty Research Assignment (Fall 2000). Member, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton (Fall 2002).  Alexander von Humboldt Resumption Fellowship, Free University of Berlin (Spring 2003). National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for University Teachers (2004-5). Loeb Classical Library Fellowship (2004-5, declined)

Recent Publications: Homosexuality in Greece and Rome: A Sourcebook of Basic Documents (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003) xvii+558pp. ''Sex in the Gym: Athletic Trainers and Pedagogical Pederasty,'' 7 (2003) 1-26. ''The Architecture of Sophocles' Ajax,'; Hermes 131 (2003) 158-71. ''The Dissemination of Epinician Lyric: Pan-Hellenism, Reperformance, Written Texts,'' in C. Mackie (ed.), Oral Performance and Its Context (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2003) 71-93. ''The Varieties of Greek Love,'' The Gay andamp; Lesbian Review[/i] 11.3 (2004) 11-12. ''The Invention of Sulpicia,'' Classical Journal 100 (2004/5) 177-94.[br] ''The Catullan Libelli Reconsidered,'' Philologus 149 (2005) 253-77. ''Pindar's Tenth Olympian and Athlete-Trainer Relationships,''andnbsp; in B. Verstraete and V. Provencal (eds.), Greek Love through the Ages: Same-Sex Desire and Love in the Greco-Roman World and in the Classical Tradition of the West (Binghamton: Haworth Press, 2005) 137-71 (= special issue of Journal of Homosexuality 49 [2005]).  ''Longus, Vergil, and the Pipes of Pan,'' in M. Fantuzzi andamp; T. D. Papanghelis (eds.), Brill's Companion to Ancient Pastoral (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2006) 499-513. ''The Pipe That Can Imitate All Pipes: Longus' Daphnis and Chloe and the Intertextual Polyphony of Pastoral Music,'' forthcoming in M. Skoie andamp; S. Velazquez (eds.), Re-inscribing Pastoral in the Humanities: Essays on the Uses of a Critical Concept (Bristol: Bristol Phoenix Press, 2006) 101-6, 160. ''History's First Child Molester: Euripides' Chrysippus and the Marginalization of Pederasty in Athenian Democratic Discourse,'' in J. Davidson, F. Muecke, and P. Wilson (eds.), Greek Drama III: Studies in Memory of Kevin Lee = BICS Supplement 87 (London: Institute of Classical Studies, 2006) 223-44. ''Theognis' Sphrandecirc;gis: Aristocratic Speech and the Paradoxes of Writing,'' in C. Cooper (ed.), Politics of Orality (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2006) 193-215. ''Attic Old Comedy and the Development of Theoretical Rhetoric,'' in I. Worthington (ed.), Companion to Greek Rhetoric (Oxford: Blackwell, 2006) 490-508.''Pindar, Heracles the Idaean Dactyl, and the Foundation of the Olympic Games,'' in G. Schaus andamp; S. Wenn (eds.), Onward to the Olympics: Historical Perspectives on the Olympic Games (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2007) 27-45.''Exile from Arcadia: Sannazaro's Piscatory Eclogues,'' in M. Paschalis (ed.), Pastoral Palimpsests: Essays in the Reception of Theocritus and Virgil = Rethymnon Classical Studies 3 (Herakleion: Crete University Press, 2007) 59-77. ''Getting the Last Word: Publication of Political Oratory as an Instrument of Historical Revisionism,'' in E. A. Mackay (ed.), Orality, Literacy, Memory in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2008) 183-200.

 

 

Courses


GK 390 • Late Euripides

33185 • Fall 2016
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

This graduate seminar will study in Greek the last four plays of Euripides: Orestes, Phoenician Women, Bacchae, and Iphigenia in Aulis, all likely dating to the period 409-6 BCE, as Athens teetered toward internal dissension and military crisis in the final stages of the Peloponnesian War. While these plays represent Euripides’ most mature dramatic work, only one, the Bacchae, is frequently read and studied. The others have been faulted for a loose and episodic structure, but the seminar will explore whether they may represent Euripides’ attempt to experiment with a new dramatic style. All four exhibit an intense focus on psychological instability of character, reflected through innovative use of meter and rhetorical figures.        

Among issues to be discussed will be dramaturgy and performance, textual transmission and actors’ interpolations, lyric meters and Euripides’ adoption of an iambic meter closer to that of comedy, manipulation of the traditional tragic Bauformen, reformulation of inherited mythical material, and resonances with the unstable political situation of the time.

Students will be graded on periodic translation quizzes (25%), participation in seminar discussions and oral reports (25%), and a final research paper (50%). Euripides’ Greek is not difficult, but students should expect and be willing to read a substantial amount of Greek and modern secondary scholarship.

Required Texts:

J. Diggle (ed.), Euripidis Fabulae III (Oxford Classical Text).

D. J. Mastronarde, Euripides’ Phoenissae (Cambridge Univ. Press).

C. W. Willink, Euripides: Orestes (Oxford Univ. Press).

Commentaries on Bacchae and IA will be provided via Canvas.

LAT 390 • Catullus And Neoteric Poetics

33380 • Fall 2016
Meets T 3:00PM-6:00PM WAG 10

Course changing to: CATULLUS

G. Valerius Catullus (84-54 BCE) occupies a unique place in Latin literary history, as our sole lyric poet of the Republican period whose work survives intact. He and the other poets of the “Neoteric” generation (including his friends Calvus and Cinna) form a critical bridge from the Alexandrian aesthetics of the Hellenistic era to the major Augustan poets such as Vergil, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid. All of his approximately 2300 verses surviving will be read and closely analyzed in the seminar; they include a variety of generic forms such as epyllion, elegy, epigram, epithalamium, and polymetric poems on both invective and amatory themes. Among the issues to be discussed are his relationship to earlier Roman poetric traditions as well as the Alexandrians, his political stance relative to Caesarism, his reflection of both heterosexual and homoerotic ideology, and the poetics of organizing a diverse collection of lyric poems. Meter and textual criticism will also be examined in some depth. 

The course grade will be based on a final research paper and presentation (50%), participation in the seminar, including short oral reports on assigned topics (25%), and periodic translation quizzes.

Texts:

R. A. B. Mynors, Catulli Carmina (OCT).

K. Quinn, Catullus: The Poems (Bristol Classical Press).

C C S301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

81020 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 201
(also listed as CTI S310)

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

LAH 350 • Mythologies Of Rape

29135 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 112
(also listed as C C 348)

This course attempts to inform modern legal and policy discussions concerning rape by exploring its conceptual genealogy not only in English Common Law, but through art, literature, and legend dating back to classical times. In Sir Matthew Hale’s famous dictum, no crime is so easily alleged or more difficult to prove. How can jurisprudential systems adequately protect the rights of the victim while granting due process and presumption of innocence to the accused? Why are juries traditionally so skeptical of rape claims? What special challenges are presented in combatting organized rape of civilian population in situations of war? To what extent is underage sex legitimately defined as “statutory rape”? What are the conditions that perpetuate prison rape? Why do men rape women (and other men)?

In tracing this conceptual history, we shall examine rape as a literary and mythological topos from the Trojan War (a founding myth of Hellenic identity) to the rape of the Sabine Women and the rape of Lucretia (founding myths of Roman independence) to modern mythologies of race and gender vulnerability in films such as D. W. Griffiths’ Birth of a Nation and the Nazi-produced Jud Süss. How have these politicized invocations of rape conditioned popular and elite assumptions that complicate the process of finding justice? How have contemporary feminism and global human rights agendas shaped our understanding and treatment of rape? The course aims to contextualize the legal issues surrounding rape in broader dimensions of social construction and gender performance. It is designed to fulfill both the Writing Flag and Ethics & Leadership Flag.

LAT 365 • Petronius

32590 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 208
(also listed as LAT 385)

This course will read the entire extant fragments of Petronius' Satyricon, a Roman comic novel likely of the Neronian period. Topics to be considered will be the novel's relation to the genres of Menippean satire and Greek prose romance, contemporary authors such as Lucan and Seneca, narratological theory, methods of reconstruction, social relations of the early Roman empire, gender and sexuality, vulgar Latin, and its influence on later European traditions of picaresque narrative. Students registered for 385 will be asked to do additional readings in relevant Latin texts.

This course carries the Writing Flag and the Independent Inquiry Flag.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32145 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 21

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 311 • Intermediate Greek I

32360 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 208

Continuation of Greek 601C or 507. Introductory readings from classical authors such as Lysias, Plato, and Xenophon. Includes grammar review.

Prerequisites: Greek 601C or 507 with a grade of at least C, or Greek 804 and 412 with a grade of at least C in each.

C C F303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

81565 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM WAG 201

This course will survey the major myths of Greek and Roman antiquity. We shall study  the individual characteristics of the gods and heroes as symbolic figures in ancient society, and the relationship of selected myths to the most important cults, rituals and religious festivals.  The cultural significance of these myths and institutions will be explored in depth by examining their transformation and reinterpretation in major works of literature and art, both ancient and modern.  We shall also discuss several modern critical approaches which help explain the origin, development, and function of myths within a complex society.  Particular emphasis will be placed on structuralist methods of interpretation.

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

32330 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WCH 1.120
(also listed as CTI 310)

This course will survey the world of the ancient Greeks from the dawn of the city-state to the rise of Macedon (ca. 800 - 350 B.C.), focusing on their cultural achievements (literary, artistic, intellectual) and on their religious, social, and political world. Attention will be paid to understanding both the Greek "mentality" in the world of the polis through literature like Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides and Plato, and the realities of their public and private lives. We shall explore the relationship between freedom and slavery, democracy and empire, political systems, and the individual and larger community. Special attention will be paid in this section to issues of gender and sexuality. We shall also examine the Greeks' emphasis on human knowledge and achievement (in art, literature, and politics as well as on the battlefield) within the context of a polytheistic religious world, as well as within its broader Mediterranean context.There will be two half-hour exams, one midterm examination, and one comprehensive final, as well as periodic short quizzes.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag and fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

32790 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 208

The goal of this course is to develop student reading skills in both prose and verse, as well as reviewing the finer points of Latin syntax and the construction of complex sentences. Most classes will be devoted to careful translation of Seneca’s Moral Epistles and his tragedy Phaedra. However, we shall also practice doing some translation of previously unseen passages. Grammar will be reviewed through occasional practice in translating sentences from English to Latin. By the end of the semester, students should be able to translate approximately 150 lines per week and thus prepared to approach other challenging authors in upper-division Latin courses.

The course grade will be based on two midterm exams (20% each), a final exam (30%), occasional vocabulary quizzes (10%), and in-class recitation (20%).

Texts:

A. L. Motto (ed.), Seneca’s Moral Epistles (Bolchazy).

S. Lawall, G. Lawall, & G. Kinkle, The Phaedra of Seneca (Bolchazy).

GK 324 • Oratory

33480 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 0.124

The purpose of this course is to introduce third-year Greek students to some of the major types and topics of Athenian oratory in the late fifth- and fourth-centuries. These works constitute a fascinating source for the political history and daily life of the period. We shall also gain a sense of the development of Greek prose style, as well as honing technical skills in grammar and translation. Each student will be expected to translate in class every day. Authors covered will include Lysias, Antiphon, Gorgias, Isocrates, and Demosthenes.Texts:

McQueen, Demosthenes: Olynthiacs (Bristol Classical Press).Carey, Lysias: Selected Speeches (Cambridge).Gagarin, Antiphon: Speeches (Cambridge).

GK 390 • Pindar & Isocrates

33543 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 10

Pindar was justly considered the greatest of the Greek lyric poets in antiquity, and a substantial portion of his work survives intact.  His poetry is well known for its lexical and metrical innovations, density of metaphor, complexity of syntax and reference, as well as its mythological revisionism, political allusions, and cultic references.  It thus continues to be a rich source of critical investigation and controversy.

The first ten weeks of this graduate course will provide a close reading and discussion of the major victory odes, as well as some fragments.  In addition, ample attention will be paid to the Pindaric scholia (probably our best preserved tradition of Alexandrian annotation next to the Homeric scholia) and to the history of Pindaric criticism in modern times.  Our approach will combine traditional text criticism and philological analysis with broader questions of literary interpretation, viewed from the varying perspectives of historical, formalist, rhetorical, and structuralist criticism.  The critical questions discussed will to some extent depend on the interests of the students in the seminar, but will certainly include Pindar's relation to mythological tradition, his attitude toward political affairs involving Thebes and the other cities for which he wrote, his relations to Orphism and Pythagoreanism, to Eleatic philosophy, to Sicilian rhetoric, the nature of choral performance, the socioeconomic significance of commissioned poetry, and the class-background of Pindar's patrons.  Consideration will also be given to Pindar's later influence, particularly in Hellenistic and Roman poetry.

The last third of the course will seek a comparandum for Pindar's encomiastic rhetoric in the epideictic oratory of Isocrates, who faced similar challenges in developing a distinctive Kunstsparche of praise that could give pan-Hellenic significance to the particular political interests for which he was an advocate.

The course grade will be determined by translation quizzes and a substantial research paper on a topic of each student's choice, as well as short oral presentations on suggested topics.

C C F303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

82242 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM WAG 214

This course will survey the major myths of Greek and Roman antiquity. We shall study  the individual characteristics of the gods and heroes as symbolic figures in ancient society, and the relationship of selected myths to the most important cults, rituals and religious festivals.  The cultural significance of these myths and institutions will be explored in depth by examining their transformation and reinterpretation in major works of literature and art, both ancient and modern.  We shall also discuss several modern critical approaches which help explain the origin, development, and function of myths within a complex society.  Particular emphasis will be placed on structuralist methods of interpretation.

GK 390 • Smnr: Sophocles

33890 • Spring 2014
Meets W 2:00PM-5:00PM WAG 10

This seminar will feature close reading and analysis of four plays by Sophocles, including Ajax, Trachiniae, and two other plays chosen by the members of the seminar. We shall begin with a careful analysis of some key passages from Aristotle’s Poetics and proceed to look at some modern theories of the tragic effect. Major issues in Sophoclean criticism will be discussed, including dramatic structure, the nature of the Sophoclean “hero,” manipulation of traditional mythological sources, Sophocles’ relation to Athenian religion, the plays as reflections of the political and social environment of late fifth-century Athens, and the question of tragedy as an enactment or deconstruction of “Athenian civic values.” We shall interrogate the plays’ relationships to the multiple audiences who witnessed or later read them. Attention will also be paid to stylistic concerns such as diction, meter, imagery, sentence structure, gnomology, intertextual echoes, and the degree to which all of these vary with character and context. We will discuss the techniques for reconstructing lost works, and students will be asked to present reports on some of the fragmentary plays. Finally, we will consider how Sophocles and Greek drama can be used to discuss ethical problems in undergraduate teaching.

The course grade will be based on a final research paper (50%), periodic translation quizzes (25%), and class participation, including at least two oral reports (25%).

LAT 312K • Intermediate Latin II

34030 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GDC 2.502

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

WGS 345 • Gender/Sexuality In Anc Novel

48060 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CLA 0.106
(also listed as C C 348)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the major works of prose fiction from Greco-Roman antiquity, and to relate those works to the intellectual, cultural, and social currents of Late Antiquity. The works examined will include Greek romances, Roman comic novels, ancient science fiction, and early Judeo-Christian fictional narratives. We shall examine both their relationship to more canonical works of classical literature and their influence in later Western literary and artistic traditions. Gender and Sexuality will be focal points of discussion, since these works often provide valuable evidence concerning ancient sexual attitudes and gender roles.

Since this is designated as a Writing Flag class, students will be assigned frequent papers and receive practice in improving their expository and argumentative skills.

Grading:

The course grade will be determined by four short papers (3-4 pages) on assigned topics (10% each), a longer final paper (6-8 pages) on a topic of each student's choice (25%), a short oral report presented to the class (10%), and participation in class discussion (25%). Regular attendance is mandatory, and will be calculated as part of the class discussion grade.

Texts:

B. P. Reardon, Collected Ancient Greek Novels (Univ. of California Press). W. Arrowsmith (tr.), Petronius: The Satyricon (New American Library). J. Lindsay (tr.), Apuleius: The Golden Ass (Indiana Univ. Press).

LAT 322 • Advanced Latin I

33715 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 3.116

The goal of this course is to develop student reading skills in both prose and verse, as well as reviewing the finer points of Latin syntax and the construction of complex sentences. Most classes will be devoted to careful translation of Seneca’s Moral Epistles and his tragedy Phaedra. However, we shall also practice doing some translation of previously unseen passages. Grammar will be reviewed through occasional practice in translating sentences from English to Latin. By the end of the semester, students should be able to translate approximately 150 lines per week and thus prepared to approach other challenging authors in upper-division Latin courses.

The course grade will be based on two midterm exams (20% each), a final exam (30%), occasional vocabulary quizzes (10%), and in-class recitation (20%).

Texts:

A. L. Motto (ed.), Seneca’s Moral Epistles (Bolchazy).

S. Lawall, G. Lawall, & G. Kinkle, The Phaedra of Seneca (Bolchazy).

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

33030 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WCH 1.120

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

LAT 311 • Intermediate Latin I

33425 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 1.210

This course is a continuation of Latin 507 (or 601C).  In Latin 311, students read Book 3 of Caesar’s Civil War.   The aim of the course is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to build command of basic Latin vocabulary; and to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Caesar’s narrative.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 25 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of assigned readings.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Caesar’s narrative.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam. 

Latin 311 partially fulfills the foreign language requirement.  A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 312.

The completion of Latin 507 or 601C with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 311.

 

Textbooks

Kennedy, Caesar: De Bello Civile III, 1st ed. (Bristol, 2002).  ISBN 185399636X

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

Traupman, New College Latin and English Dictionary, 3rd ed. (Bantam, 2007)  ISBN 978-0-553-59012-8

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32895 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WCH 1.120

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

WGS 345 • Gender/Sexuality In Anc Novel

47019 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM MEZ B0.302
(also listed as C C 348)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the major works of prose fiction from Greco-Roman antiquity, and to relate those works to the intellectual, cultural, and social currents of Late Antiquity. The works examined will include Greek romances, Roman comic novels, ancient science fiction, and early Judeo-Christian fictional narratives. We shall examine both their relationship to more canonical works of classical literature and their influence in later Western literary and artistic traditions. Gender and Sexuality will be focal points of discussion, since these works often provide valuable evidence concerning ancient sexual attitudes and gender roles.

Since this is designated as a Writing Flag class, students will be assigned frequent papers and receive practice in improving their expository and argumentative skills.

Grading:

The course grade will be determined by four short papers (3-4 pages) on assigned topics (10% each), a longer final paper (6-8 pages) on a topic of each student's choice (25%), a short oral report presented to the class (10%), and participation in class discussion (25%). Regular attendance is mandatory, and will be calculated as part of the class discussion grade.

Texts:

B. P. Reardon, Collected Ancient Greek Novels (Univ. of California Press). W. Arrowsmith (tr.), Petronius: The Satyricon (New American Library). J. Lindsay (tr.), Apuleius: The Golden Ass (Indiana Univ. Press).

GK 390 • Gender/Sexuality In Anc Greece

33535 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 112

Ancient Greece is the first culture for which we have rich and abundant evidence concerning sexual attitudes, gender roles, and gender conflict. Moreover, the Greek model was variously constructed and appropriated by later periods of Western civilization as a paradigm for counter-normative sexual acts, attitudes, and identities. This has led to intensive scholarly discussion since the late 1970s both among classicists and historians of gender and sexuality.
     This seminar will combine close examination of primary texts (including the lyrics of Sappho and Anacreon, Aeschylus' Oresteia, Sophocles' Antigone, Euripides' Hippolytus, Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus, Demosthenes' Against Neaera and Aeschines' Against Timarchus) and key secondary literature (including the works of Michel Foucault, David Halperin, Luc Brisson, Camille Paglia, Judith Butler, and James Davidson) to assess some of the key questions and debates: did the Greeks conceive of people's sexual preference as an identity category? Was pederasty an elite practice or widespread? What social function did pederasty serve for the Greeks? Was it generally accepted or a locus of social and political contestation? Were women regarded as naturally inferior to men or did they create their own domains of power and authority? What distinguished female sexual feeling from male eros? Were boys socialized to feel sexual desire and at what age? Were male homoerotic relations always age-stratified? What role did prostitution of both males and females play in the sexual economy, and to what extent was it voluntary or involuntary? How was gender deviance on the part of both males and females construed? Was Greek sexuality governed by rigid norms and protocols or did Greece feature the same range of variance as modern Western societies? How were changing attitudes toward gender and sexuality affected by demographic and political developments? What attitudes did various philosophical schools adopt to issues of gender and sexuality?
     WGS students may read all primary texts in translation; Classics students will be required to read some of them in Greek. The course grade will be based on a final research paper (50%) and class discussion, including oral reports (25%). The remaining 25% will be based on translation quizzes for Classics students, a final examination for WGS students.

WGS 340 • Anc Mediterran Masculinities

47637 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.120
(also listed as C C 348)

How did ancient men define themselves as men? What were the realms of activity and modes of selfpresentation that marked one as masculine rather than feminine? What were the areas of greatest anxiety in the performance of masculine gender? Can all ancient cultures be reduced to a common stereotype, or was each culture distinctive in its articulation of sexual difference and gender roles? What, if anything, is special about the ancient Greeks? In this course, we will attempt to ponder the many paradoxes of masculinity by comparing with each other literary productions of several ancient civilizations, including especially Mesopotamia, Egypt, Palestine, Greece, and Rome. In so doing, we may also hope to inspire critical reflection upon our present culture's construction of what it is to be male and masculine.

C C 303 • Intro To Classical Mythology

32180 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WEL 1.316

This course will survey the major myths of Greek and Roman antiquity. We shall study  the individual characteristics of the gods and heroes as symbolic figures in ancient society, and the relationship of selected myths to the most important cults, rituals and religious festivals.  The cultural significance of these myths and institutions will be explored in depth by examining their transformation and reinterpretation in major works of literature and art, both ancient and modern.  We shall also discuss several modern critical approaches which help explain the origin, development, and function of myths within a complex society.  Particular emphasis will be placed on structuralist methods of interpretation.

GK 385 • Plato And Greek Prose

32430 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 112

The primary aim of this course is to improve the student's facility in reading Greek
prose.  We will begin by reading the Symposium of Plato, the form of Greek prose with
which students will probably be most familiar.  This will consolidate students' knowledge
of classical Attic syntax and morphology.  We will then read selections of the Attic orators.
For the first few meetings I will set only as much text as I think we can go over in a
class period.  After this, however, I will set more text than we can cover (in
increasingly longer amounts over the semester) and will select only a portion of the
assignment for translation in class.  Students will not be allowed to read from a written
translation.
The student's grade will be based on 3 quizzes (20% each) and a final exam (40%). These will include both seen and unseen passages.

GK 365 • Callimachus

32730 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112

GK 365 Seminar in Greek:

Critical study of authors such as Thucydides, Demosthenes, and Aeschylus.

Prerequisites: Greek 324 or 328.

Carries the Independent inquiry and Writing flags.

LAT 385 • Elegy

32990 • Spring 2010
Meets WF 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 10

Prof. Thomas K. Hubbard
Office: WAG 9
Hours: WF 10-11:30
Telephone: 471-0676
tkh@mail.utexas.edu


LATIN 385 – ROMAN ELEGY (32990)

Latin love elegy was arguably one of the few poetic genres without clear Greek precedent. Through close engagement with poems of Propertius, Tibullus, Ovid, and a few others, as well as a representative selection of secondary literature, we will attempt to trace the evolution of a distinctively Roman voice, emphasizing elegy as a medium of gender performance against the grain of traditional Roman political and family values. We will consider its relationship both to other forms of Latin poetry (e.g. epic, pastoral, comedy) and to the rather different genre of Greek elegy. The evolution of each poet’s distinctive style and voice will also be charted, as well as the elegists’ interrelations with each other.
         Students’ grade in the course will be based on periodic translation quizzes (20%), a research paper of about fifteen to twenty pages (50%), two oral reports (10% each), and partcipation in seminar discussions (10%).
    Students with certified disabilities (see http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd/) or who celebrate religious holidays that conflict with class meetings (see http://www.utexas.edu/provost/policies/religious_holidays/) are asked to identify themselves to the instructor within the first two weeks of class; every reasonable accommodation will be made. Any form of scholastic dishonesty, such as copying from another student’s exam paper or turning in a paper that has been taken from another source, will be punished with failure of the course and a referral to the Dean of Students (see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php).

Date        Topic
Jan. 20        Introduction: Greek Background and the Uniqueness of Roman Elegy

Jan. 22        Propertius’ Monobiblos and the Augustan Poetry Book (Prop. 1.1-1.5)
Jan. 27        Opposition to War and Epic (Prop. 1.6-1.9)
Jan. 29        The Problem of Gallus (Prop. 1.10-1.14)
Feb. 3        The Alienated Lover (Prop. 1.15-1.18; Ovid, Am. 1.6)
Feb. 5        Epilogues (Prop. 1.19-1.22)

Feb. 10    Tibullus’ Program (Tib. 1.1-1.3)
Feb. 12    The Delia Cycle (Tib. 1.5, 1.6)
Feb. 17    Pastoral and Civilization (Tib. 1.10, 2.1, 2.5)
Feb. 19    Pederastic Elegy (Tib. 1.4, 1.8, 1.9; Prop. 2.4)
Feb. 24    The Corpus Tibullianum: Lygdamus and Sulpicia (Tib. 3.3, 4.2-4.12)

Feb. 26    Guest presentation by Sharon James (Prop. 2.5, 2.6, 2.8, 2.9)
March 3    Problems of Division and Arrangement (Prop. 2.17, 2.18, 2.22-2.24)
March 5    More Problems of Division and Arrangement (Prop. 2.26, 2.30-33)
March 10    Propertius’ Program in Book 2 (Prop. 2.1, 2.10, 2.34)
March 12     Propertius’ Callimacheanism (Prop. 3.1-3.3, 3.9)
SPRING BREAK
March 24    Propertius’ Relation to the Augustan Order (Prop. 2.7, 3.4, 3.5, 3.12, 3.13)
March 26     No class (CAMWS conference)
March 31    Conflict with Cynthia (Prop. 3.8, 3.14, 3.15, 3.19, 3.20)
April 2        Departure from Cynthia (Prop. 3.21, 3.23-25, 4.7)
April 7        The Program of Book 4 (Prop. 4.1, 4.6)
April 9        Etiological Elegy (Prop. 4.2, 4.4, 4.9)

April 14    Was Catullus an Elegist? (Cat. 68)
April 16    Elegy and Epigram: Questions of Definition (Cat. 65-67, 76)

April 21&23    Elegy and Didactic (Ars Amatoria , Book I)
April 28&30    Masculinity as Gender Performance (Ars Amatoria , Book II)
May 5&7    Feminine Agency (Ars Amatoria , Book III)
May 11    Research papers due (noon)


The required textbooks for the course are:
L. Richardson, Propertius: Elegies I-IV (Oklahoma).
M. C. J. Putnam, Tibullus: A Commentary (Oklahoma).
G. Luck, Albii Tibulli aliorumque carmina (K. G. Saur).
E. J. Kenney, P. Ovidii Nasonis Amores etc. (OCT).







C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

32610 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM BUR 106

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

LAT S312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

82346 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 204

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312.

LAT 312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

32420 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM SZB 284

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312

 

Textbooks

Pharr, Aeneid Books I-VI, 1st ed. (Bolchazy-Carducci 1998).  ISBN 978-0-86516-421-5

Bennett, New Latin Grammar, 1st ed.,  (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2000).  ISBN 978-0-86516-262-7

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

32755 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM FAC 21

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

LAT 365 • Vergil's Eclogues And Georgics

33268 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM GAR 2.124

LAT 365 Seminar in Latin:

Critical study of authors such as Horace, Livy, Lucretius, and Tacitus.

Prerequisites: Latin 323 with a grade of at least C.

This course carries Writing and Independent Inquiry flags

LAT S312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

83725 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 308

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312.

GK 383 • Aristophanes

32923 • Spring 2008
Meets WF 1:00PM-2:30PM WAG 10

Greek Literature Survey

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence surveying the major forms and genres of Greek literature from the Archaic through Classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. As in the first half, we’ll proceed mainly in chronological order, beginning with oratory and rhetoric in the fifth century BCE, moving on to historiography, philosophy, and Hellenistic poetry, and ending with Imperial literature from the second century CE. Most of our time and effort will be devoted to reading and analyzing representative selections by some of the more influential authors in these areas and periods. Readings will include large helpings of Greek, additional reading in translation, and critical commentary and scholarship.

The survey has multiple overlapping goals:

  • Strengthen and refine reading and translating skills: speed, accuracy, precision, etc.
  • Sharpen critical and analytical skills through exercises in close reading informed by recent scholarship and related resources.
  • Survey classical and later Greek literature in its various forms and genres, including how they developed and interacted over time.
  • Close study of representative examples of these forms and genres from each period.
  • Practice methods and techniques for developing and articulating an informed critical response to your reading, both orally and in writing.

The survey is also designed to help students prepare for the doctoral exams in literature, not as a glorified crib-sheet but by fostering the skills and core knowledge required for teaching and scholarship in Classics – precisely what the exams are meant to promote and assess. There is of course far more to Greek literature than we can explore here, but the survey will help students to develop both a global map of the wider terrain and the critical skills and resources to broaden and deepen that knowledge as they advance through the program and beyond.

Forms and periods covered include Classical prose (oratory, historiography, philosophy), New Comedy, Hellenistic poetry (including hymn, elegy, pastoral, epigram), and Imperial prose (including biography, novel, satire). Readings will be drawn from Antiphon, Gorgias, Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Menander, Callimachus, Aratus, Theocritus, Plutarch, Longus, Lucian, and others.

Grading: participation 10%, sight translation 20%, passage commentaries 25%, essays 35%

There is no final exam. In its place, the written portion of the doctoral exam in Greek Literature will be offered in two parts near the end of the semester:

   1) take-home portion over a weekend before the end of classes

   2) two essays at the scheduled final exam period

See  http://www.utexas.edu/cola/classics/graduate/admissions/exam-prompts/lit-written.php

LAT 323 • Elegy

33115 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RAS 211B

LAT 323 Advanced Latin II:

Reading and interpretation of prose and poetry texts at an early advanced level.

Prerequisites: Latin 322 with a grade of at least C.

LAT S507 • First-Year Latin II

83720 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WAG 308

This course is a continuation of Latin 506.  It has two main aims:  to increase the student's fluency in Latin through reading and close examination of grammar and syntax, and to introduce students to Roman life and culture.

There will be daily assignments from Wheelock’s Latin, including review of Chapters 1-27 and a careful study of Chapters 27-40.  This will be supplemented by further connected readings from Caesar’s Gallic Wars.

Prerequisites:  Completion of Latin 506 or the equivalent with a grade of C or higher.

Latin 507 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Intermediate Latin (Latin 311 and 312), where they will read selections from Vergil, Cicero, and other authors

GK 390 • Pindar

32205 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM WAG 112

GK 390 Seminar in Classical Studies:

Selected topics in Greek studies. Topics given in recent years include Mycenaean documents, Aristotle's ethics, Archaic poetry, and Plato's Symposium.

C C 301 • Introduction To Ancient Greece

32605 • Fall 2006
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM FAC 21

Say "Ancient Greece", and the words conjure up timeless images of shining white temples among olive trees, bronze-armored heroes, and bearded philosophers discussing the nature of the universe. Our popular vision of the ancient Greeks makes them seem both familiar and irrelevant to the modern world. In fact, however, Greek culture is deeply alien to our own, and at the same time surprisingly relevant. On the one hand, ancient Greek society is just as confusing, shocking, and easy to misinterpret as any other culture is for an outside observer -- even more so, because we are separated from it not only by space but by time. On the other hand, we have the Greeks to thank for much of the way we think today about politics, art, science, and the meaning of life.

This course is meant to introduce students to this complex and intriguing culture and to its legacy in our own society. We will look at ancient Greece on its own terms through the examination of primary sources of all types -- literary, artistic, archaeological -- in an attempt to develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of Ancient Greek society and culture between the Bronze Age and the Hellenistic period. We will also place the discussion of these sources in the context of the shifting meaning of Ancient Greece in the modern world, from the Homeric romanticism of Heinrich Schliemann to the meaning of democracy in the 21st century. Within a roughly chronological framework, lectures will examine Greek literature to discover what the Greeks said about themselves; Greek art and archaeology to understand how people lived and to hear the voices of those -- women, children, slaves, foreigners and outsiders -- who left no written testimony; and modern controversies to see what the Greeks say about us.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

 

GK 506 • First-Year Greek I

32845 • Fall 2006
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 10

This course is an introduction to reading ancient Greek - the language of some of the world’s oldest and best loved writings, including Homer, Herodotus, Plato, and the New Testament. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

Greek 506 is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek 507 and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek (GK 311 and 312), where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer.

Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests (three midterms and a final).

LAT S507 • First-Year Latin II

83645 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WAG 308

This course is a continuation of Latin 506.  It has two main aims:  to increase the student's fluency in Latin through reading and close examination of grammar and syntax, and to introduce students to Roman life and culture.

There will be daily assignments from Wheelock’s Latin, including review of Chapters 1-27 and a careful study of Chapters 27-40.  This will be supplemented by further connected readings from Caesar’s Gallic Wars.

Prerequisites:  Completion of Latin 506 or the equivalent with a grade of C or higher.

Latin 507 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Intermediate Latin (Latin 311 and 312), where they will read selections from Vergil, Cicero, and other authors

GK 385 • Hellenistic Poetry

31300 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CBA 4.336

GK 385 Graduate Reading Course:

Topics given in recent years include Plato and Greek prose, Sophocles, and Sophists.

C C 348 • Homosexuality In Antiquity-W

30605 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.124

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

LAT 506 • First-Year Latin I

30945 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 311

This course is an introduction to Latin, the language of ancient Rome and famous writers like Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and St. Augustine. Latin is also an excellent way to improve your command of other languages: Latin is the source of over 60% of English vocabulary, and also the ancestor of all the “Romance” languages of Europe, including French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Latin 506 introduces basic grammar and vocabulary in an interesting and challenging format, through reading selections from a wide range of Roman authors and exploring aspects of Roman life and culture.  By the end of the semester, students are reading excerpts from famous works and ready to continue into Latin 507.

The course covers chapters 1-27 of Wheelock’s Latin and also selected readings from 38 Latin Stories. There will be daily assignments, regular quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Prerequisites: None. Note: This course may not be counted by students offering two or more admission units or any previous college credit in Latin.  

Latin 506 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective. 

Requirements: Class participation, homework, quizzes, midterm tests, and  a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Latin 507: First-Year Latin II, where they will read selections from Caesar and other authors. 

 

Texts:

Wheelock, Wheelock's Latin (Harper 6h edition)

Groton & May, 38 Latin Stories (Bolchazy)

Corneau & LeFleur, Workbook to Wheelock's Latin (Harper) optional

Goldman & Szymanski, English Grammar for Students of Latin (Olivia & Hill) (optional)

GK 507 • First-Year Greek II

28640 • Spring 2004
Meets MTWTHF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 10

This course continues the introduction to reading Ancient Greek begun in Greek 506.  Starting with a brief review, we shall complete the basic grammar and move on to read passages from various Greek authors.

Daily assignments covering grammar, vocabulary, composition, and translation will enable the diligent student to acquire a firm grasp of Attic Greek.  Regular attendance is essential.  Evaluation will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and three tests and a final.

Prerequisite:  Greek 506 or equivalent (i.e. one semester of Greek).

This course can be counted for partial fulfillment of foreign language requirements.

GK 324 • Euripides

28660 • Spring 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 208

GK 324 Advanced Greek:

Reading and analysis of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, and Plato.

Prerequisites: Greek 312K or 312L (or 322) with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of at least A-, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

GK 383 • Greek Chorus

29050 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WAG 10

Greek Literature Survey

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence surveying the major forms and genres of Greek literature from the Archaic through Classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. As in the first half, we’ll proceed mainly in chronological order, beginning with oratory and rhetoric in the fifth century BCE, moving on to historiography, philosophy, and Hellenistic poetry, and ending with Imperial literature from the second century CE. Most of our time and effort will be devoted to reading and analyzing representative selections by some of the more influential authors in these areas and periods. Readings will include large helpings of Greek, additional reading in translation, and critical commentary and scholarship.

The survey has multiple overlapping goals:

  • Strengthen and refine reading and translating skills: speed, accuracy, precision, etc.
  • Sharpen critical and analytical skills through exercises in close reading informed by recent scholarship and related resources.
  • Survey classical and later Greek literature in its various forms and genres, including how they developed and interacted over time.
  • Close study of representative examples of these forms and genres from each period.
  • Practice methods and techniques for developing and articulating an informed critical response to your reading, both orally and in writing.

The survey is also designed to help students prepare for the doctoral exams in literature, not as a glorified crib-sheet but by fostering the skills and core knowledge required for teaching and scholarship in Classics – precisely what the exams are meant to promote and assess. There is of course far more to Greek literature than we can explore here, but the survey will help students to develop both a global map of the wider terrain and the critical skills and resources to broaden and deepen that knowledge as they advance through the program and beyond.

Forms and periods covered include Classical prose (oratory, historiography, philosophy), New Comedy, Hellenistic poetry (including hymn, elegy, pastoral, epigram), and Imperial prose (including biography, novel, satire). Readings will be drawn from Antiphon, Gorgias, Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Menander, Callimachus, Aratus, Theocritus, Plutarch, Longus, Lucian, and others.

Grading: participation 10%, sight translation 20%, passage commentaries 25%, essays 35%

There is no final exam. In its place, the written portion of the doctoral exam in Greek Literature will be offered in two parts near the end of the semester:

   1) take-home portion over a weekend before the end of classes

   2) two essays at the scheduled final exam period

See  http://www.utexas.edu/cola/classics/graduate/admissions/exam-prompts/lit-written.php

LAT S507 • First-Year Latin II

83250 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WAG 208

This course is a continuation of Latin 506.  It has two main aims:  to increase the student's fluency in Latin through reading and close examination of grammar and syntax, and to introduce students to Roman life and culture.

There will be daily assignments from Wheelock’s Latin, including review of Chapters 1-27 and a careful study of Chapters 27-40.  This will be supplemented by further connected readings from Caesar’s Gallic Wars.

Prerequisites:  Completion of Latin 506 or the equivalent with a grade of C or higher.

Latin 507 may be counted as partially fulfilling the foreign language requirement, or the General Culture requirement, or as an elective.

Requirements: Class participation, quizzes, midterm tests, and a final exam.

Students earning a C or better may advance to Intermediate Latin (Latin 311 and 312), where they will read selections from Vergil, Cicero, and other authors

LAT S312K • Sec-Yr Lat II: Vergil's Aeneid

83395 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WAG 308

This course is a complement to Latin 311 and is the final course in the beginning-intermediate Latin sequence.  In Latin 312, students will read selections from Vergil’s Aeneid.   The aim of the class is to develop students’ Latin reading and comprehension skills through careful translation of assigned and unseen passages; to review the basic morphology and syntax learned in Latin 506 and Latin 507 while introducing students to new forms and syntax as they arise; to enhance command of Latin vocabulary, including poetic diction; to introduce students to the literary and historical context of Vergil’s Aeneid; and to teach students the basic features of Latin meter.

Class time will be devoted to the translation of assigned Latin passages, ranging from 8-10 lines early in the semester to about 30 lines by the end of the semester.  Students will be expected to identify and explain the morphology and syntax of the assigned Latin.  They will be expected to be able to scan a dactylic hexameter and will practice scansion in class throughout the semester.  There will also be regular class discussions of the historical context and literary features of Vergil’s poem.  Students should expect homework assignments for each class meeting as well as regular quizzes, both announced and unannounced.  Final grades will be determined by attendance and class participation; quizzes; midterm exams; and a comprehensive final exam.  

Latin 312 fulfills the foreign language requirement. A grade of C or higher is required to advance to Latin 322.

The completion of 311 with a grade of C or higher is a prerequisite for Latin 312.

LAT 385 • Catullus

28718 • Spring 2002
Meets M 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 10

LAT 385 Studies in Classical Latin Literature

 

C C 303 • Classical Mythology

28875 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM FAC 21

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 365 • Greek Lyric Poetry

29195 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM GEA 114

GK 365 Seminar in Greek:

Critical study of authors such as Thucydides, Demosthenes, and Aeschylus.

Prerequisites: Greek 324 or 328.

Carries the Independent inquiry and Writing flags.

C C 303 • Classical Mythology

28470 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WEL 1.308

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

Fulfills the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.

Carries the Global Cultures flag.

Fulfills the Cultural Expression, Human Experience, & Thought Course area requirement.

GK 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

28775 • Spring 2001

Prerequisites: Previous enrollment in Greek 679HA

Course Description: Supervised conference course for honors candidates in Greek. Three conference hours a week for two semesters.

Majors who plan to seek special honors in Ancient History and Classical Civilization, special honors in Greek, special honors in Latin, or special honors in Classics should apply to the honors adviser for admission to the honors program at least one full academic year before they expect to graduate. A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average in the coursework required for the major of at least 3.50 are required for admission. The requirements for graduation with special honors, which are in addition to the requirements of the major, are (1) AHC 679HA and 679HB-W, Greek 679HA and 679HB-W, Latin 679HA and 679HB-W, or Classical Civilization 679HA and 679HB-W, Honors Tutorial Course, with a grade of A in each half; (2) a University grade point average of at least 3.00 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the coursework required for the major and an “A” in each half of the honors tutorial course; and (3) completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted toward the degree.

Requirements for the Honors Thesis:

(1.) The student must discuss the Honors program option with the Faculty Academic Advisor.
(2.) The student must fill out and have signed a Conference Course form for the 679HA and 679HB-W courses.
(3.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HA for directed reading and research under a faculty mentor.
(4.) The student must spend one semester enrolled in 679HB-W writing the Honors Thesis. Students should consult a semester academic calendar and consult with their faculty mentors to determine a schedule for completion of the Thesis. A second faculty reader must also review the Thesis.
(5.) The College of Liberal Arts expects a Thesis to require at least 20 pages of reviewed and revised text. Although there is no other required minimum, the Thesis should consist of more substantial output.
(6.) The final version of the Thesis must be turned in to the Department of Classics Undergraduate Advisor in an electronic (PDF) format or bound copy.

Carries an Independent Inquiry flag.

GK 383 • Pindar And Isocrates

28785 • Spring 2001
Meets F 12:00PM-3:00PM WAG 10

Greek Literature Survey

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence surveying the major forms and genres of Greek literature from the Archaic through Classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. As in the first half, we’ll proceed mainly in chronological order, beginning with oratory and rhetoric in the fifth century BCE, moving on to historiography, philosophy, and Hellenistic poetry, and ending with Imperial literature from the second century CE. Most of our time and effort will be devoted to reading and analyzing representative selections by some of the more influential authors in these areas and periods. Readings will include large helpings of Greek, additional reading in translation, and critical commentary and scholarship.

The survey has multiple overlapping goals:

  • Strengthen and refine reading and translating skills: speed, accuracy, precision, etc.
  • Sharpen critical and analytical skills through exercises in close reading informed by recent scholarship and related resources.
  • Survey classical and later Greek literature in its various forms and genres, including how they developed and interacted over time.
  • Close study of representative examples of these forms and genres from each period.
  • Practice methods and techniques for developing and articulating an informed critical response to your reading, both orally and in writing.

The survey is also designed to help students prepare for the doctoral exams in literature, not as a glorified crib-sheet but by fostering the skills and core knowledge required for teaching and scholarship in Classics – precisely what the exams are meant to promote and assess. There is of course far more to Greek literature than we can explore here, but the survey will help students to develop both a global map of the wider terrain and the critical skills and resources to broaden and deepen that knowledge as they advance through the program and beyond.

Forms and periods covered include Classical prose (oratory, historiography, philosophy), New Comedy, Hellenistic poetry (including hymn, elegy, pastoral, epigram), and Imperial prose (including biography, novel, satire). Readings will be drawn from Antiphon, Gorgias, Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Menander, Callimachus, Aratus, Theocritus, Plutarch, Longus, Lucian, and others.

Grading: participation 10%, sight translation 20%, passage commentaries 25%, essays 35%

There is no final exam. In its place, the written portion of the doctoral exam in Greek Literature will be offered in two parts near the end of the semester:

   1) take-home portion over a weekend before the end of classes

   2) two essays at the scheduled final exam period

See  http://www.utexas.edu/cola/classics/graduate/admissions/exam-prompts/lit-written.php

C C S303 • Classical Mythology

82675 • Summer 2000
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM FAC 21

Myths accompanied Greek and Roman culture as a constant from the pre-literate era before the Homeric epics through the hyper-literary myths of the Roman period. These myths helped the ancient Greeks and Romans to make sense of their world and to address issues with regard to religion, philosophy, and even early attempts at natural science. In different forms, myths still inform our understanding of the world, and Classical mythology in particular has continued to influence western art and literature up to the present day. This class begins with an examination of the Greek understanding of the creation of the world, the pantheon of gods, and the creation of humanity. Time will also be spent on the origins of Greek mythology, looking to the mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, which have influenced Greek thought. Throughout the course attention will be given to particular gods, goddesses, heroes and heroines and the myths which surround them in both the Greek and Roman traditions. Classical Civilization 303 and 352 may not both be counted.

This course carries a Global Cultures flag.

C C 348 • Homosexuality In Antiquity-W

27975 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM GAR 200

C C 348 Topics in Ancient Civilization:

The development and progress of ancient civilization, including history, philosophy, literature, and culture. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required.

 

GK 324 • Sophocles

28150 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 203

GK 324 Advanced Greek:

Reading and analysis of classical authors such as Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, and Plato.

Prerequisites: Greek 312K or 312L (or 322) with a grade of at least C; or Greek 412 with a grade of at least A-, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

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