Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Julia H. Lee


Ph.D., 2005, University of California, Los Angeles

Julia H. Lee

Contact

Courses


E 314V • Asian American Lit & Culture

34760 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 304
(also listed as AAS 314)

Instructor:  Lee, J            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34760            Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AAS 314            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: The purpose of this class is to explore how authors and cultural producers have imagined what it means to be "Asian American" over the course of the past century. To that end, we will read closely a broad range of literature, film, and critical essays with an eye toward contextualizing them in their historical, social, and cultural milieus. While the course covers a diverse range of Asian immigrant histories (Chinese, Japanese, South Asian, Filipino, and Vietnamese to name some), we will pay close attention to the formation of Asian American subjectivities across axes of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and citizenship.

This course will also introduce you to critical trends within the field of Asian American literature. Some of the questions we will address include: What constitutes Asian American literature and the Asian American literary canon? What sorts of formal practices do Asian American texts share with each other, if any? In what ways do Asian American texts reflect dominant social notions of racial identity, and in what ways do they contest those paradigms? How do these texts imagine the “Asian American experience” and what do they imagine being “Asian American” means?

Texts: Readings may include works by some of the following authors: Jessica Hagedorn, Fae Ng, lê thi diem thúy, Jhumpa Lahiri, Adrian Tomine, Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Hisaye Yamamoto, Don Lee.

Requirements & Grading: As much as possible, this class will be run in a seminar format. That means that I expect your oral and written commentary to be engaged with the material we are studying, both thematically and formally. You need to: (1) attend all classes; (2) talk during class, whether by asking a question, making a comment, or responding to another's remark; (3) arrive on time; (4) complete all required reading thoroughly; (5) bring the necessary papers and materials to class.

Class participation: 10%?; Essay 1, 5 pages: 15%; ?Essay 2, 5 pages: 15%; Essay 3, 5 pages: 15%; Essay 4, 5 pages: 15%; Revision; Exam 1: 15%; Exam 2: 15%.

E 376M • Asian Amer Memoirs And Stories

35655 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 308
(also listed as AAS 320)

Instructor:  Lee, J            Areas:  V / G

Unique #:  35655            Flags:  Cultural Diversity, Writing,

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AAS 320            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines the memoir as a narrative of personal and community identity. We will read and discuss literary and nonfiction texts that encompass a wide range of Asian American experiences that deal with issues of race, gender, sexuality, class, immigration, foodways, geographical location, and national belonging. The relationship between memory and narrative will be the focus of the course, and some of the questions we will attempt to answer are: how particular is the experience of this author and can it be applied to other Asian American communities/individuals? What kinds of memories or events are often included in Asian American memoirs? Why are certain episodes selected for inclusion in a memoir and others not?

Texts: (potential reading list) May-lee Chai, Hapa Girl; Edith Eaton, “Leaves from the Mental Portfolio of a Eurasian”; Jane Furiya, Bento Box in the Heartland; Bich Nguyen, Stealing Buddha’s Dinner; Eric Liu, The Accidental Asian; Jade Snow Wong, Fifth Chinese Daughter; Mitsuye Yamada, Camp Notes and Other Poems.

Requirements & Grading: Essay #1: 15%; Essay #2: 15%; Revision of Essay #1 or #2: averaged into original grade; Essay #3: 20%; Essay #4: 25%; Class participation: 10%; Weekly writing quizzes: 15%.

E 397N • Theories Of Race And Ethnicity

35905 • Fall 2012
Meets T 6:00PM-9:00PM MEZ 1.104

This course will examine a series of theoretical paradigms for understanding race and ethnicity in the twentieth century. Students will be required to understand the relationships between these various approaches and apply them to literary texts. Readings and discussion will focus on how race and ethnicity are negotiated in the following: ethnicity theory; multiculturalism and polyculturalism; racial formation; diaspora studies; psychoanalysis; poststructuralism; and imperialist and colonial discourses. Evaluation will be based on discussion, two in-class presentations, an annotated bibliography, and an article-length essay.

E 349S • Willa Cather

35335 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 103

Instructor:  Lee, J            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  35335            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

Description: This course will examine the writings of Willa Cather. We will read how her works negotiate a variety of representational issues, including gender, sexuality, national belonging, racial difference, and memory; additionally, the course will consider the pivotal role that Cather’s fiction has had in the reformulation of the American literary canon in the late twentieth century. Reading will include Cather’s fiction as well as a selection of critical essays and biographical excerpts.

Texts: O Pioneers!; The Song of the Lark; My Ántonia; A Lost Lady; The Professor’s House; Lucy Gayheart; Death Comes for the Archbishop; Sapphira and the Slave Girl; Stories from Youth and the Bright Medusa.

Requirements & Grading: Essay 1: 20%; Essay 2: 20%; Essay 3: 20%; Class Participation: 10%; Exam 1: 15%; Exam 2: 15%.

E 376M • Contemp Asian Amer Novels

35485 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 204
(also listed as AAS 320)

Instructor:  Lee, J            Areas:  III / G

Unique #:  35485            Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AAS 320            Computer Instruction:  No

E 379N (Topic: Contemporary Asian American Novels) may not also be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: It’s one thing to write books that no one reads, but what happens when the American reading public suddenly becomes interested? During the course of your lifetime, books written by Asian Americans have exploded into the publishing world. Since Since the blockbuster success of Amy Tan, publishers have been on a relentless quest to discover the next Joy Luck Club. This class examines how Asian American literature has responded to the increased interest from the publishing and reading worlds. We start by analyzing Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior and Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club, works that are considered the ur-texts for the Asian American novel in academic and popular discourses respectively. Why did these novels become emblematic for various reading communities for the “Asian American experience”?

We will then turn to a selection of works written by Asian Americans since 1990. The focus of the class for the rest of the term will be on how these narratives propagate or explode popular conceptions of what constitutes an “Asian American” story. A key interpretive issue for the class will be exploring how the novels balance the expectations of their mainly white readership with their individual explorations of what constitutes Asian American subjectivity, experience, and literature. In approaching that question, we will also consider the reception the book has had, within academic and popular communities. We will be reading the reviews and author interviews that appeared in the mainstream press at the time of publication as well as a selection of critical essays. Attention will be paid to formal structure, narration, and genre as well as how issues of race, sexuality, gender, and national identity are represented.

Texts: Susan Choi, American Woman; Gish Jen, Typical American; Nora Okja Keller, Comfort Woman; Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior; Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake; lê thi diem thúy, The Gangster We Are All Looking For; Chang-Rae Lee, Native Speaker; Don Lee, Country of Origin; Fae Ng, Bone; Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club; Monica Truong, The Book of Salt.

Requirements & Grading: Class participation, 10%; three essays (6 pages each), 45% (15% each x 3); Essay revision, 15%; Response papers (1 page), 15%; Article analysis (2-3 pages), 15%.

E 314V • Asian American Lit & Culture

34625 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 310
(also listed as AAS 314)

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: The purpose of this class is to explore how authors and cultural producers have imagined what it means to be "Asian American" over the course of the past century. To that end, we will read closely a broad range of literature, film, and critical essays with an eye toward contextualizing them in their historical, social, and cultural milieus. While the course covers a diverse range of Asian immigrant histories (Chinese, Japanese, South Asian, Filipino, and Vietnamese to name some), we will pay close attention to the formation of Asian American subjectivities across axes of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and citizenship.

This course will also introduce you to critical trends within the field of Asian American literature. Some of the questions we will address include: What constitutes Asian American literature and the Asian American literary canon? What sorts of formal practices do Asian American texts share with each other, if any? In what ways do Asian American texts reflect dominant social notions of racial identity, and in what ways do they contest those paradigms? How do these texts imagine the “Asian American experience” and what do they imagine being “Asian American” means? 

Texts: Readings may include works by some of the following authors: Jessica Hagedorn, Fae Ng, lê thi diem thúy, Jhumpa Lahiri, Adrian Tomine, Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Hisaye Yamamoto, Don Lee.

Requirements & Grading: As much as possible, this class will be run in a seminar format. That means that I expect your oral and written commentary to be engaged with the material we are studying, both thematically and formally. You need to: (1) attend all classes; (2) talk during class, whether by asking a question, making a comment, or responding to another's remark; (3) arrive on time; (4) complete all required reading thoroughly; (5) bring the necessary papers and materials to class.

Class participation: 10%?; Essay 1, 5 pages: 15%; ?Essay 2, 5 pages: 15%; Essay 3, 5 pages: 15%; Essay 4, 5 pages: 15%; Revision; Exam 1: 15%; Exam 2: 15%.

E 376M • Asian Amer Memoirs And Stories

35475 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 308
(also listed as AAS 320)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines the memoir as a narrative of personal and community identity. We will read and discuss literary and nonfiction texts that encompass a wide range of Asian American experiences that deal with issues of race, gender, sexuality, class, immigration, foodways, geographical location, and national belonging. The relationship between memory and narrative will be the focus of the course, and some of the questions we will attempt to answer are: how particular is the experience of this author and can it be applied to other Asian American communities/individuals? What kinds of memories or events are often included in Asian American memoirs? Why are certain episodes selected for inclusion in a memoir and others not? 

Texts: (potential reading list) May-lee Chai, Hapa Girl; Edith Eaton, “Leaves from the Mental Portfolio of a Eurasian”; Jane Furiya, Bento Box in the Heartland; Bich Nguyen, Stealing Buddha’s Dinner; Eric Liu, The Accidental Asian; Jade Snow Wong, Fifth Chinese Daughter; Mitsuye Yamada, Camp Notes and Other Poems.

Requirements & Grading: Essay #1: 15%; Essay #2: 15%; Revision of Essay #1 or #2: averaged into original grade; Essay #3: 20%; Essay #4: 25%; Class participation: 10%; Weekly writing quizzes: 15%.

E 314V • Asian American Lit & Culture

34865 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 204
(also listed as AAS 314)

The primary goal of this course is to explore how authors have imagined what it means to be ?Asian American? over the course of the past century. To that end, we will close-read a broad range of literature, film, and essays with an eye towards contextualizing them in their historical, social, and cultural milieus. While the course covers a diverse range of Asian immigrant histories, we will pay close attention to the formation of Asian American subjectivities across axes of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and citizenship. Some of the questions we will address include: what constitutes Asian American literature and the Asian American literary canon? What sorts of formal practices do Asian American texts share with each other, if any? In what ways do Asian American texts reflect dominant social notions of racial identity, and in what  ways do they contest those paradigms? How do these texts imagine the ?Asian American experience? and what do they imagine being ?Asian American? means?

E 370W • Asian American Women's Lit

35740 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 304
(also listed as AAS 320)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines cultural productions by Asian American women writers in order to map the multiple trajectories of Asian American studies as a field. Although it appears to be a self-evident term describing a definable group of authors, “Asian American women” actually operates as a highly contested category, in which different discourses surrounding race, gender, nationality, and sexuality collide. The syllabus will be arranged so that each text is paired with another; we will thus see the divergent and multifaceted ways that different texts negotiate the different problematics surrounding history, sexuality, nationality, genre, and authenticity, to name a few. These pairings should not limit what you can think or what we can say about the books; they should inspire you to draw connections and distinctions between all of the texts. Some of the questions we might consider in our discussions: What purpose does such the constructed term “Asian American women” serve? What expectations about race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship do these works shatter and which do they reinforce?

Texts: (possible) Asian Women United (eds.), Asian American Women; Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Dictée; Susan Choi, American Woman; Maxine Hong Kingston, China Men and The Woman Warrior; Jhumpa Lahiri, Unaccustomed Earth; Monique Truong, The Book of Salt; Karen Tei Yamashita, Tropic of Orange.

Requirements & Grading: Participation 10%; In-class writing (passage explications) 10%; First essay 20%; Second essay 20%; Third exam 20%; Fourth essay 20%.

E 314V • Asian American Lit & Culture

33900 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 310
(also listed as AAS 314)

Course Description

The purpose of this class is to explore how authors and cultural producers have imagined what it means to be "Asian American" over the course of the past century. To that end, we will read closely a broad range of literature, film, and critical essays with an eye toward contextualizing them in their historical, social, and cultural milieus. While the course covers a diverse range of Asian immigrant histories (Chinese, Japanese, South Asian, Filipino, and Vietnamese to name some), we will pay close attention to the formation of Asian American subjectivities across axes of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and citizenship.

This course will also introduce you to critical trends within the field of Asian American literature. Some of the questions we will address include: What constitutes Asian American literature and the Asian American literary canon? What sorts of formal practices do Asian American texts share with each other, if any? In what ways do Asian American texts reflect dominant social notions of racial identity, and in what ways do they contest those paradigms? How do these texts imagine the "Asian American experience" and what do they imagine being Asian American means?

Grading Policy

As much as possible, this class will be run in a seminar format. That means that I expect your oral and written commentary to be engaged with the material we are studying, both thematically and formally. You need to: (1) attend all classes; (2) talk during class, whether by asking a question, making a comment, or responding to another's remark; (3) arrive on time; (4) complete all required reading thoroughly; (5) bring the necessary papers and materials to class.

Class participation 10%( Essay 1, 5 pages 15% Essay 2, 5 pages 15% Essay 3, 5 pages 15% Essay 4, 5 pages 15% Explication 1 15% Explication 2 15%

Texts

Readings may include works by some of the following authors: Jessica Hagedorn, Fae Ng, lê thi diem thúy, Jhumpa Lahiri, Adrian Tomine, Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Bienvenidos Santos, and Don Lee.

E 376M • Contemp Asian Amer Novels

34895 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 204
(also listed as AAS 320)

Cross-listed with AAS 320

E 379N (Topic: Contemporary Asian American Novels) may not also be counted.

Course Description: It’s one thing to write books that no one reads, but what happens when the American reading public suddenly becomes interested? During the course of your lifetime, books written by Asian Americans have exploded into the publishing world. Since Since the blockbuster success of Amy Tan, publishers have been on a relentless quest to discover the next Joy Luck Club. This class examines how Asian American literature has responded to the increased interest from the publishing and reading worlds. We start by analyzing Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior and Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club, works that are considered the ur-texts for the Asian American novel in academic and popular discourses respectively. Why did these novels become emblematic for various reading communities for the “Asian American experience”? We will then turn to a selection of works written by Asian Americans since 1990. The focus of the class for the rest of the term will be on how these narratives propagate or explode popular conceptions of what constitutes an “Asian American” story. A key interpretive issue for the class will be exploring how the novels balance the expectations of their mainly white readership with their individual explorations of what constitutes Asian American subjectivity, experience, and literature. In approaching that question, we will also consider the reception the book has had, within academic and popular communities. We will be reading the reviews and author interviews that appeared in the mainstream press at the time of publication as well as a selection of critical essays. Attention will be paid to formal structure, narration, and genre as well as how issues of race, sexuality, gender, and national identity are represented.

Texts: Susan Choi, American Woman; Gish Jen, Typical American; Nora Okja Keller, Comfort Woman; Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior; Jhumpa Lahiri, The Namesake; lê thi diem thúy, The Gangster We Are All Looking For; Chang-Rae Lee, Native Speaker; Don Lee, Country of Origin; Fae Ng, Bone; Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club; Monica Truong, The Book of Salt.

Grading: Class participation, 10%; three essays (6 pages each), 45% (15% each x 3); Essay revision, 15%; Response papers (1 page), 15%; Article analysis (2-3 pages), 15%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

E 397N • Asian Amer Lit, Cul, & Theory

35115 • Fall 2010
Meets M 6:00PM-9:00PM BEN 1.118

Students taking this course will be introduced to some of the literary texts and theoretical issues that have been the focus of Asian American cultural criticism since its emergence in the late 1960’s. While the course will cover a diverse range of Asian  immigrant histories, its primary focus will be on the formation of Asian American subjectivities across axes of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and nation. The syllabus will include a range of  literary productions, which we will attempt to situate historically, as well as critical works that are milestones in or  present new directions for the field. In addition, we will also engage with a series of critical texts that are concerned more broadly with theories of race and ethnicity in the twentieth century. The seminar will explore the tension between the identity-based, pan-ethnic framework that historically underpins Asian American Studies as well as Ethnic Studies and the post-structuralist turn away from the subject that has characterized literary and cultural criticism of the past few decades.

Requirements

  • Two presentations, each on a primary text
  • Abstract for the research paper
  • One 20-page research paper

Possible Primary Texts

Theresa Hak-kyung Cha, Dictée
Jessica Hagedorn, Dogeaters
David Henry Hwang, M. Butterfly
Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior
Jhumpa Lahiri, The Interpreter of Maladies
Shani Mootoo, Cereus Blooms at Night
Ruth Ozeki, My Year of Meats
Lois Ann Yamanaka, Blu’s Hanging

Possible Secondary Texts

Leslie Bow, Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion (selections)
Wendy Brown, States of Injury (selections)
Anne Cheng, The Melancholy of Race (selections)
Kandice Chuh, Imagine Otherwise (selections)
Henry Louis Gates, "Writing 'Race,' and the Difference It Makes"
Ian Haney-Lopez, White by Law (selections)
Laura Kang, Compositional Subjects (selections)
Lisa Lowe, Immigrant Acts (selections)
Colleen Lye, America’s Asia (selections)
Michael Omi and Howard Winant, Racial Formation in the United States
Stephen Sumida, “The More Things Change”
Trinh T. Minh-ha, Woman Native Other (selections)
Sau-ling Wong, “Denationalization Reconsidered”

 

Publications


“Estrangement on a Train: Race and Narratives of American Identity,” ELH 75.2 (2008): 345-365.

“The Capitalist and Imperialist Critique in H. T. Tsiang’s And China Has Hands.” Recovered Legacies: Authority and Identity in Early Asian American Literature. Ed. Floyd Cheung and Keith Lawrence. Philadelphia: Temple UP, 2005. 80-97.

Interracial Encounters: Reciprocal Representations in African and Asian American Literatures, 1896-1937. New York: New York University Press, October 2011.

Curriculum Vitae


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