Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Lisa L Moore


Ph.D., 1991, Cornell University

Lisa L Moore

Contact

Courses


CRW 330 • Literature For Writers

34425 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CAL 419

CRW 330  l  Literature for Writers

Instructor:  Moore, L

Unique #:  34425

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  CRW Certificate students

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  One of the following: CRW 325 (or E 325), 325F (or E 325F), 325M, 325P (or E 325P).

Description:  In this course, we will learn to read like writers.  We will read a range of classic and contemporary poetry and fiction in order to become appreciative and accurate observers of literary form—of how literary language works, not just what it says--and learn to recognize and employ effective techniques from fiction and poetry.  Whether students come in with a primary interest in fiction, poetry, both, or other genres, they will practice poetic and fictional strategies to build their writing skills and add to their literary repertoires.  Students can expect to read excerpts and/or single works from novelists and short story writers such as Austen, James, Woolf, Auster, Kundera, Fowles, Ishiguro, Munro, and Lahiri; and poets such as Shakespeare, Keats, Shelley, Thomas, Merrill, Hacker, Rios, Kizer, Wong, Corral, Brooks, Rukeyser, and Duffy.  By the end of the semester each student will have completed exercises in 15 different literary forms or genres and revised seven of these into a portfolio of their best work.

Texts:  Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life • David Lodge, The Art of Fiction • Mark Strand and Eavan Boland, The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms • Alice Munro, Runaway • Jhumpa Lahiri, The Interpreter of Maladies • Marilyn Hacker, Love, Death, and the Changing of the Seasons • Eduardo Corral, Slow Lightning.

Requirements and Grading:  Weekly Online Practice Journal (250 words): 20% of final grade; 30-minute Class Presentation 20% of final grade; Mid-term portfolio submission: 20% of final grade; Final portfolio submission: 40% of final grade.

E 303C • Plan II World Lit Part I

34525 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 310

Description:

In this course we will trace the emergence of a tradition of women's writing in English from the Middle Ages to the present. We will follow the path of the English language along the routes of trade and colonialism as become a global phenomenon representing literary traditions all over the world. Along the way, we will ask how the literary record documents women's changing status and ongoing challenges and achievements in different national and regional contexts. Students can expect to finish this course with a broad knowledge of British, American and Anglophone post-colonial literary history, familiarity with the major genres of literature in English, skills in feminist literary and cultural analysis, and an introduction to the role of gender in the cultures of the English-speaking world.


In the fall semester (303C) we will focus on literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the nineteenth century; in the spring (303D) we will study works from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Texts/Readings:

Fall
Kempe, The Booke of Margery Kempe 

Clarke, ed. Isabella Whitney, Mary Sidney and Aemilia Lanyer:  Renaissance Women Poets 
Behn, Oronooko, The Rover, and Other Works Caretta, ed., Phillis Wheatley: Complete Writings 

Austen, Persuasion

Franklin, ed. The Poems of Emily Dickinson, Reading Edition


Spring

Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway
Anne Sexton, Complete Poems, ed. Maxine Kumin 
Alice Munro, Lives of Girls and Women 
Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior 
Toni Morrison, Beloved 
Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things 
Sally Morgan, My Place
Chimizu Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun 
Sullivan, Wendt, Whatiri, Contemporary Polynesian Poetry in English
Alison Bechdel, Fun Home 

Assignments:
Fall
Two Blackboard posts (100 words each) per week (14 weeks):  20% of final grade
Three 3-5 page Creative/Analytic Assignments: each 20% of final grade
Performance as a peer editor:  10% of final grade
Final group presentation:  10% of final grade

Spring
Two 250-word Blackboard posts per week, for a total of 15% of the final grade
A close reading, worth 10% of the final grade
An analysis of secondary criticism, worth 10% of the final grade
An archival assignment, worth 10% of the final grade
A term paper abstract, worth 10% of the final grade
An annotated bibliography, worth 10% of the final grade
A 8-10 page term paper, worth 30% of the final grade (includes revision)
Performance as a peer editor, worth 5% of the final grade

About the Professor:
Lisa L. Moore, Archibald Hill Professor of English and Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, is the author of Sister Arts: The Erotics of Lesbian Landscapes (Minnesota, 2011), which won the Lambda Literary Award.  She has written or edited four other books and over fifty articles and essays, and is an award-winning poet. Her teaching has been recognized by six teaching awards. She is also the recipient of the Milburn Award for GLBTQ Achievements, the Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Mentor Award, and the Outstanding Contribution to Academic Service Learning Award. She first taught Plan II World Literature in 1994 and has loved it ever since. 

E S349S • Jane Austen

82120 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 206

E s349S  l  1-Jane Austen

Instructor:  Moore, L

Unique #:  82120

Semester:  Summer 2016, second session

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  In this class, we will read five of Jane Austen’s six classic novels, considering them in historical and literary context. Students will learn about Austen’s place in literary history, the characteristics of the novel form, and the historical and cultural factors that shaped her fiction. Throughout, we will ask what Austen’s novels have to teach us as contemporary readers in a different world—or is it?

Texts:  Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Mansfield Park, Persuasion.

Requirements & Grading:  Two 150-word Blackboard posts per week, for a total of 40% of the final grade; a midterm worth 20% of the final grade; and a final exam worth 40% of the final grade.

E 389P • Queer Poetics

34895 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 305
(also listed as WGS 393)

At the crossroads of queer theory, poetics scholarship, and poetic craft lie a number of interesting questions. Is there such a thing as queer form or content in poetry?  Queer formalism?  Queer voice?  Queer material?  

To address these questions, we will revisit familiar members of the canon of American poetry such as Dickinson, Whitman, Stein and Crane, and also explore 20th- and 21st-century poets working in the context of lesbian and gay liberation, the rise of LGBT studies, the AIDS crisis, and contemporary queer culture. Students can expect to be introduced both to practical criticism (e.g. how to scan verse, how to identify, use, and analyze different poetic forms) and theoretical debates (e.g. the status of the lyric, the politics of formalism).  They will also read classic essays on gender and sexuality in the queer theory canon including Foucault, Lacan, Butler, and Sedgwick.  This is a survey course that begins with Whitman and Dickinson and may include  Hart Crane, Langston Hughes, Gertrude Stein, Elizabeth Bishop, Allen Ginsburg, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Marilyn Hacker, Cyrus Cassels, Eileen Myles, Thom Gunn, Rafael Campo,  and others.

This class is open to both M.A./Ph.D and MFA students.  The final assignment for the course is a student-organized day-long conference at which participants will give either an academic presentation or a poetry reading.

E 603A • Composition/Reading World Lit

33780 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM PAR 302

Description:

In this course we will trace the emergence of a tradition of women's writing in English from the Middle Ages to the present. We will follow the path of the English language along the routes of trade and colonialism as become a global phenomenon representing literary traditions all over the world. Along the way, we will ask how the literary record documents women's changing status and ongoing challenges and achievements in different national and regional contexts. Students can expect to finish this course with a broad knowledge of British, American and Anglophone post-colonial literary history, familiarity with the major genres of literature in English, skills in feminist literary and cultural analysis, and an introduction to the role of gender in the cultures of the English-speaking world. In the fall semester (603A) we will focus on literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the nineteenth century; in the spring ((603B) we will study works from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Texts/Readings:

Kempe, The Booke of Margery Kempe (13th century)

Clarke, ed. Isabella Whitney, Mary Sidney and Aemilia Lanyer: Renaissance Women Poets (16th century)

Behn, Oronooko, The Rover, and Other Works (Aphra Behn, 17th century)

Hensley, ed., The Works of Anne Bradstreet (17th century)

Caretta, ed., Phillis Wheatley: Complete Writings (18th century)

Austen, Northanger Abbey (18th century)

Eliot, Middlemarch

Assignments:

Two Blackboard posts (100 words each) per week (14 weeks): 20% of final grade

Three 3-5 page Creative/Analytic Assignments: each 20% of final grade

Performance as a peer editor: 10% of final grade

Final group presentation: 10% of final grade

About the Professor:

Lisa L. Moore, Professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies, is the author of Sister Arts: The Erotics of Lesbian Landscapes (Minnesota, 2011), which won the Lambda Literary Award and was a finalist for the Publishers' Triangle Award.  She has written or edited four other books and over fifty articles and essays, and is an award-winning poet. Her teaching has been recognized by six teaching awards. She is also the recipient of the Milburn Award for GLBTQ Achievements, the Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Mentor Award, and the Outstanding Contribution to Academic Service Learning Award. She first taught Plan II World Literature in 1994 and has loved it ever since.

E 337E • Brit Lit: Restoration-Romantic

34456 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 105

E 337E  l  British Literature: The Restoration through the Romantic Era

Instructor:  Moore, L

Unique #:  34456

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing

Description: In 1660, King Charles II was “restored” to the British throne after the only period in history in which England was not a monarchy, but instead a Commonwealth ruled by the Puritan Oliver Cromwell.  In 1832, the passage of the Reform Act significantly diminished the power of a small group of aristocrats to control Parliament, and almost doubled the number of British citizens entitled to vote.  The literature of this exciting period records how it feels to live through world-historical changes such as these.  What changed, and for whom, in the “Age of Revolution?”  What traditions persisted?  In this class, you will sharpen your skills of literary analysis in order to understand what the fiction, poetry, and drama of the period has to tell us about these questions.

Texts: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Restoration and The Eighteenth CenturyThe Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Age of Romanticism • Samuel Richardson, Pamela, or, Virtue Rewarded (Oxford) • Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Norton)

Requirements & Grading: Three 3-5 page take-home essay examinations.

E 370W • Gay And Lesbian Lit And Cul

34885 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as WGS 345)

E 370W  l  8-Gay and Lesbian Literature and Culture

Instructor:  Moore, L

Unique #:  34885

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  WGS 345

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.; Writing

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course, we will examine the tradition of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer self-representation in English through literary texts that document the emergence of a queer literary tradition and political community. Writing assignments will emphasize careful close reading and formal analysis of these texts in two short papers; both of these papers will be revised. Our final project will be an in-class reading and performance of student writing.

Texts: Dickinson, selected poems; Whitman, selected poems; Forster, Maurice; Hall, The Well of Loneliness; Baldwin, Giovanni's Room; Brown, Rubyfruit Jungle; Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit; Kushner, Angels in America Part I: Millenium Approaches; Bridgforth, Love/Conjure Blues; Chee, Edinburgh; Bechdel, Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; Blanco, Looking for the Gulf Motel.

Films: Schiller, Rosenberg, Before Stonewall; Scagliotti, After Stonewall; Van Sant, Milk.

Requirements & Grading: Two Blackboard posts (100 words each) per week (14 weeks): 20% of final grade; Two 3-5-page essays: each 20% of final grade; Performance as a peer editor: 10% of final grade; Final group presentation: 10% of final grade.

E 392M • Transatl Feminisms Age Of Rev

35125 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 210

Between the English Revolution of 1689 and the Irish Rebellion of 1798, the transatlantic world was rocked by industrial and political change.  The emergence of modern democratic capitalism and its concomitant values of equality, liberty, and justice took place against a backdrop of slavery, imperialist violence, and the raping of natural resources.  Throughout this period, women seized opportunities to argue for an expansion of their roles and rights in the experimental post-revolutionary political systems that were being devised, but repeatedly, revolutionary promises failed to extend to women as citizens. This course examines feminist writing in a variety of genres produced in the English-speaking Atlantic world of the eighteenth century, including materials from Britain, British North America, and the British Caribbean.   Our examination of these texts will allow us to ask such questions as:  What were the major concerns of eighteenth-century writers critical of the condition of women in their time?  How do such writers contribute to, and/or contest, emerging categories of nation and citizenship? What is the relationship between writing about women’s rights and critiques of slavery?  What difference does genre make to how women are represented and advocated for?  How do letters, transcribed narratives, and popular periodical verse, as well as polished verse satire, novels, and philosophical tracts, broaden our definitions of the “literary”?  And how do the various “Englishes” used in writing by slaves, free women of color, bluestockings, Loyalists and Patriots, and planter’s wives challenge our definitions of eighteenth-century “English” literature?  Is there a “feminist Atlantic” in eighteenth century literature?

WGS 391 • Feminist Theories

47965 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.340

The primary goal of this course will be to introduce students, especially those in the English department’s Women, Gender, and Literature concentration, to feminist theory and scholarship.   Teaching such a course at the current moment presents a pedagogical challenge; the field has now been established for long enough that it has a history, and texts that were once central to establishing the field are no longer so crucial.  In an attempt to address the challenge of both providing necessary background and addressing current debates, the course will pair “classic” texts with contemporary ones.  Along the way, we will aim to explore the intersections of feminism with psychoanalysis, poststructuralism, Marxism, critical race theory, queer theory, among other fields.  In recognition that “theory” has often now become embedded in the work of cultural analysis, the course will also use selected primary texts as case studies. 

E S349S • Jane Austen-Eng

83750 • Summer 2013

Instructor:  Moore, L            Areas:  I / H

Unique #:  83750            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Summer 2013, second session            Restrictions: Oxford Summer Program participants

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in English.

Description: This course will focus on “Jane Austen’s landscapes.” The eighteenth century was the great age of English landscape gardens, and Jane Austen followed the debates about how best to “improve the estate” keenly. We will visit gardens Jane Austen knew and admired and consider how landscape theories affect the plots and characters of her four last novels. We will also consider biographical, historical, literary and feminist aspects of the novels of one of the great women writers in English.

Texts:Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Persuasion.

Requirements & Grading: Four 150-word Blackboard posts per week, for a total of 60% of the final grade; a class presentation worth 40% of the final grade.

E 392M • Eighteenth-Cen Poetry/Poetics

35850 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 214

18th-Century Poetry and Poetics

This course will survey the major poetic movements and achievements of Restoration and eighteenth-century Anglo-American verse, as well as introduce students to current debates in poetry scholarship.  We will look at both poetry and criticism from the period, considering topics such as the sublime and the beautiful, the sister arts debate, the rise of the poetess, neoclassical and other formalisms, the sonnet revival, and the origins of Romanticism.  Finally, we will consider how these issues inform current debates in poetics.

Authors considered may include Bradstreet, Dryden, Rochester, Behn, Pope, Swift, Finch, Wheatley, Johnson, Thompson, Barlow, Seward, Young, Smith and Robinson.

This class is open to both M.A./Ph.D and MFA students.  The final assignment for the course is a student-organized day-long conference at which participants will give either an academic presentation or a poetry reading.

Requirements:

Weekly online short writing assignments:  10% of final grade

Conference organizing:  10% of final grade

In-class oral presentation:  20% of final grade

Annotated bibliography:  20% of final grade

Abstract:  10% of final grade

Conference paper/Suite of poems:  30% of final grade

LAH 350 • Sister Arts

30165 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CAL 21
(also listed as E 350M)

Instructor:  Moore, L            Areas:  II / E

Unique #:  35530            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  English Honors

Cross-lists:  LAH 350            Computer Instruction:  No

Only one of the following may be counted: E 350M (Topic: Sister Arts), 379M (Topic: Sister Arts: English Poetry, Painting, and Gardens, 1700-1832), 379S (embedded topic: The Sister Arts: Gardening, Poetry, and Painting in Eighteenth-Century England).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines the concept of the “sister arts,” the interrelated genres of poetry, painting, and garden design, in the English Enlightenment and Romantic periods. At the end of the course, students can expect to be familiar with important poems, paintings and gardens from the period; to be able to use the terms, definitions, and genres examined to analyze literary and visual culture; and to be more informed and skillful cultural critics. In addition, students will train themselves in visual analysis by completing simple drawing and design assignments, graded on what was learned rather than on artistic merit, and polish their skills in literary writing and research by completing a formal research paper.

Texts: Hunt and Willis, The Genius of the Place:  The English Landscape Garden, 1620-1820; The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 1C (The Restoration and Eighteenth Century); The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 2A (The Romantics and Their Contemporaries); Moore, Sister Arts: The Erotics of Lesbian Landscapes.

Requirements & Grading: Three Creative/Analytic Assignments worth 30% each of the final grade; One 15-minute Oral Presentation on your research, worth 15% of the final grade; Weekly 250-word Blog Posts, worth 15% of the final grade; A Final Research Paper, worth 35% of the final grade; Performance as a Peer Editor, worth 5% of the final grade.

WGS 305 • Intro To Women's & Gender Stds

47035 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CBA 4.332

In this course, you will:

? become familiar with key terms within and authors of feminist analysis

? use WGS terms and concepts to analyze texts (archives, films, a novel, a public event)

? think for yourself and put your life and surroundings in conversation with our readings

? practice looking for and learning from transnational grassroots feminist activists

? journal about change and challenges created by a human rights framework for gender justice

? take part in our ongoing discussion about what WGS is and what possibilities it creates

E 389P • Queer Poetics

35615 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.104
(also listed as WGS 393)

Queer Poetics

At the crossroads of queer theory and poetics scholarship lie a number of interesting questions.  Is there such a thing as queer form or content in poetry?  Queer formalism?  Queer voice?  Queer content or material?  Through close examination of the poetry of such figures as Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Hart Crane, Gertrude Stein, Cyrus Cassels, Carl Phillips, Marilyn Hacker, Rafael Campos, Black Took Collective and Gabrielle Calvocoressi, we will analyze the prosody and poetics of verse that can be said to address queer identities, perspectives, or aesthetics.  Class activities will be co-ordinated with the programming of the Texas Institute for Literary and Textual Studies (TILTS), whose 2011-12 theme is “Poets&Formalists.”

Requirements:

Students will organize and present their own research at a final day-long conference.

Conference organizing:  20% of final grade

In-class presentation:  20% of final grade

Annotated bibliography:  20% of final grade

Conference paper:  40% of final grade

E S349S • Jane Austen-Eng

83795 • Summer 2011

Only one of the following may be counted: E 349S (Topic 1), 379M (Topic: Jane Austen), 379M (Topic: Jane Austen on Location).

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course will focus on “Jane Austen’s landscapes.” The eighteenth century was the great age of English landscape gardens, and Jane Austen followed the debates about how best to “improve the estate” keenly. We will visit gardens Jane Austen knew and admired and consider how landscape theories affect the plots and characters of her four last novels.

 

Texts: (all by Austen, all required. It is recommended that you do as much reading as possible before the semester begins): Pride and Prejudice; Emma; Mansfield Park; Persuasion.

 

Requirements & Grading: Four 250-word Blackboard posts per week, for a total of 50% of the final grade; a class presentation worth 25% of the final grade; a final 3-5 page literary analysis worth 25% of the final grade.

E 392M • Transatl Feminisms Age Of Rev

36005 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.104

Transatlantic Feminisms in the Age of Revolution

Between the English Revolution of 1689 and the Irish Rebellion of 1798, the transatlantic world was rocked by industrial and political change.  The emergence of modern democratic capitalism and its concomitant values of equality, liberty, and justice took place against a backdrop of slavery, imperialist violence, and the raping of natural resources.  Throughout this period, women seized opportunities to argue for an expansion of their roles and rights in the experimental post-revolutionary political systems that were being devised, but repeatedly, revolutionary promises failed to extend to women as citizens. This course examines feminist writing in a variety of genres produced in the English-speaking Atlantic world of the eighteenth century, including materials from Britain, British North America, and the British Caribbean.   Our examination of these texts will allow us to ask such questions as:  What were the major concerns of eighteenth-century writers critical of the condition of women in their time?  How do such writers contribute to, and/or contest, emerging categories of nation and citizenship? What is the relationship between writing about women’s rights and critiques of slavery?  What difference does genre make to how women are represented and advocated for?  How do letters, transcribed narratives, and popular periodical verse, as well as polished verse satire, novels, and philosophical tracts, broaden our definitions of the “literary”?  And how do the various “Englishes” used in writing by slaves, free women of color, bluestockings, Loyalists and Patriots, and planter’s wives challenge our definitions of eighteenth-century “English” literature?  Is there a “feminist Atlantic” in eighteenth century literature?

This course will be of interest to English department students in the Women, Gender and Literature and Ethnic and Third World Literature concentrations, as well as to students concentrating in British or American literature. It will also be useful to students outside the English department as a historical background for modern feminist thought and an opportunity to learn about cultural studies methods from a literary perspective.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

There will be a significant professional development component to this course.  Assignments will be structured to give students practice with the skills of the professional academic, and the final assignment for the entire class will be the planning and participation in a one-day conference.  Thus, all students will complete the class with a(n additional) conference paper on their CVs.  Attendance at all conference activities is a class requirement.

E F370W • Gay And Lesbian Lit And Cul

83110 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 105
(also listed as WGS F345)

Cross-listed with WGS 345

Course Description: This course offers a context for understanding literature and other art forms created by and about LGBT people (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered) in the English-speaking world. We will analyze LGBT self-representation through careful examination of texts that document queer cultural traditions and political communities. Writing assignments will emphasize careful close reading and formal analysis of these texts in a series of short papers; all four of these papers will be revised. A final group project will draw on the variety of genres studied during the semester to create a class presentation.

Texts: 

  • Essays by Oscar Wilde, James Baldwin, Jane Rule, Audre Lorde, Dorothy Allison, Minnie Bruce Pratt, Gloria Anzaldua, Paul Monette, David Sedaris, Carl Phillips, Arturo Islas (please print out from Blackboard site under Course Documents)
  • Poems by Shakespeare, Behn, Dickinson, Whitman, Anzaldua, Marilyn Hacker, Carl Philips (also on Blackboard)
  • Short stories by E.M. Forster and Radclyffe Hall (also on Blackboard)
  • James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room
  • Rita Mae Brown, Rubyfruit Jungle
  • Audre Lorde, Zami:  A New Spelling of My Name
  • Leslie Feinberg, Stone Butch Blues
  • Michael Nava, The Little Death
  • Tony Kushner, Angels in America
  • Allison Bechdel, Fun Home

Grading:

  • Five 250-word blog posts per week (25%)
  • Two 5-7 page personal essays, both revised, worth 15% each (30%)
  • Five 2-3 page book reviews, worth 5% each (25%)
  • Performance as a peer editor (10%)
  • Final group project/performance (10%)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.  

UGS 302 • Feminism Now-W

64550 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MAI 220B

UGS 302 (64550)—First-Year Signature Course-W
FEMINISM NOW
TTH 11-12:30
MAI 220B
Professor Lisa L. Moore (English and Women’s and Gender Studies)
Office hours: TTH 2-3:30 PAR 217 llmoore@mail.utexas.edu

Description
Are you a feminist? Why or why not? In this course, you will learn about the
history and principles of feminism as a social movement, an academic discipline,
and a political theory, and you will have the opportunity to put your own values
into action by creating a community engagement project with a small group of
students. Through reading, research, reflection, writing, and action, we will
discover the ways that feminism can be put to everyday use as well as be a
source of ongoing intellectual challenge. Students can expect to read the
classics of feminist theory, meet feminist scholars on campus, and interact with
community leaders working on gender issues.
The course has several goals: to offer students the opportunity to read classic
and contemporary works of feminist writing; to have students design and execute
a community engagement project; and to improve analytical and critical skills
through writing, discussion, oral presentation and project design.

WGS S345 • Gay And Lesbian Lit And Cul

89606 • Summer 2005
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM MEZ 1.120

Our stereotypical image of an early modern woman is a witch - for some good reasons because thousands of witch trials took place. In this course, we will look beyond that perspective to explore the complex of material, political, and cultural factors that shaped experiences of gender and family and that shaped attitudes about gender and power in early modern Europe. The early modern centuries between about 1500 and 1800 were years of tremendous change in many ways - religious reformations, European governments became more powerful at home and established colonies world wide, economic transformation as people became consumers and production expanded exponentially. Some features were slower to change, however, especially with regard to family life. In this class, we will explore how women's experiences of these patterns compared to men's - whether as workers, consumers, criminals, political subjects and political actors, peasants or nobles, spouses or parents. Along the way, we will explore why some of these dynamics fed into a proliferation of "witches."

WGS 392 • Rsch Smnr Women'S/Gend Studies

47250 • Fall 2004
Meets W 6:00PM-9:00PM PAR 214

This course is designed to prepare graduate students in gender studies and the qualitative social sciences to conduct a research project for their master’s theses or similar projects. We will explore a range of research methods and traditions as well as the epistemological assumptions underlying them. We will consider what it means to conduct “feminist” research, as well as the perils and promise of the more participatory research traditions. Some of the research methods we will explore include interviewing, survey research, case studies, textual analysis, and participant observation.

WGS 698A • Thesis

44655 • Spring 2004

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php

WGS 392 • Rsch Smnr Women'S/Gend Studies

46035 • Fall 2003
Meets T 9:30AM-12:30PM SZB 423

This course is designed to prepare graduate students in gender studies and the qualitative social sciences to conduct a research project for their master’s theses or similar projects. We will explore a range of research methods and traditions as well as the epistemological assumptions underlying them. We will consider what it means to conduct “feminist” research, as well as the perils and promise of the more participatory research traditions. Some of the research methods we will explore include interviewing, survey research, case studies, textual analysis, and participant observation.

WGS 698A • Thesis

46100 • Fall 2003

The Thesis or Report is required by the Master's Program.  It represents the final paper or research project that the student creates to culminate their coursework in Women's and Gender Studies. A student must be enrolled in the Thesis or Report course during the semester they intend to graduate.

When registering for the Thesis or Report course, the student must turn in the Thesis/Report Proposal Forms linked below.

The Thesis form is used to link the professor to the online grading system.  This also serves as documentation for faculty supervising the Thesis or Report.  Students should sign up for the Thesis course when they have secured a faculty member to work with them.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/centers/cwgs/graduate-application/thesis-report.php

WGS F345 • Gay And Lesbian Lit And Cul

89450 • Summer 2003
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 206

Varies by topic/section.

WGS 392 • Rsch Smnr Women'S/Gend Studies

45695 • Fall 2002
Meets W 1:00PM-4:00PM SZB 423

This course is designed to prepare graduate students in gender studies and the qualitative social sciences to conduct a research project for their master’s theses or similar projects. We will explore a range of research methods and traditions as well as the epistemological assumptions underlying them. We will consider what it means to conduct “feminist” research, as well as the perils and promise of the more participatory research traditions. Some of the research methods we will explore include interviewing, survey research, case studies, textual analysis, and participant observation.

Books


  Transatlantic Feminisms

 

 

 

  

 

Eds. Lisa L. Moore, Joanna Brooks, Caroline Wigginton

Transatlantic Feminisms in the Age of Revolutions

2012
Oxford University Press

  Sister Arts

  

 

 

 

  

Lisa L. Moore

Sister Arts: The Erotics of Lesbian Landscapes

2011
University of Minnesota Press
Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies
Finalist, Publishing Triangle Judy Grahn Award

 

  Experiments in a Jazz Aesthetic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eds. Omi Osun Joni L. Jones, Lisa L. Moore, and Sharon Bridgforth

Experiments in a Jazz Aesthetic: Art, Activism, Academia and the Austin Project

2010
University of Texas Press

  Dangerous Intimacies

 

  

 

  

  

 

Lisa Moore

Dangerous Intimacies: Toward a Sapphic History of the British Novel

1997
Duke University Press

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creative Writing


Lisa Moore

 

 

 

 

  

Ongoing Columns

Poetry contributor at the Los Angeles Review of Books

Contributor at The Women’s Review of Books

 

Poems and Essays

"Kenneth Lanphier, 48: Hobbs, NM." http://www.lamentforthedead.org/poems/2015/6/19/kenneth-lanphier-48-hobbs-nm

“Moan and Low.” Poem. Tinderbox Poetry Journal, 2015. http://www.tinderboxpoetry.com/moan-and-low

“Epithalamion,” “Football,” “Highwood River Swimming Hole,” “Branding Time, 1979.” White Wall Review, 2015.

“Raising White Men,” “Home Safety,” “I Think You Know,” “Narrow Rooms,” “Nephews.” Poems. Halvard Johnson’s Truck, April 5, 2015.  http://halvard-johnson.blogspot.com/2015/04/i35-creativity-corridor-index-of.html 

“El Refugio, Texas.” Poem. Anchor Magazine, Issue 3, Spring 2015.

“Cold Garden.” Poem. Ostrich Review 6.2. http://ostrichreview.com/issues/ostrich-6-2/

“Raising White Men.”  Poem.  Blog This Rock, Dec.. 10 2014. http://blogthisrock.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2014-12-11T19%3A47%3A00-05%3A00&max-results=7

“On Judy Grahn’s `Mental.””  Essay.  Short Takes on Long Poems volume 5, at Length Magazine, 7 April 2014.  http://atlengthmag.com/poetry/short-takes-on-long-poems-volume-5/

“Epithalamion.”  Poem.  Codex Journal, December 24, 2013.  http://codexjournal.com/QPOC13.html

“Cowgirl Filibuster:  Couplets for Heroic Texas Women.”  Poem. Split This Rock Poem-of-the-Week, July 5 2013.  http://blogthisrock.blogspot.com/2013/07/poem-of-week-lisa-l-moore.html.  Reprinted on Alice Walker, The Official Website http://alicewalkersgarden.com/2013/07/a-yellow-rose-for-texas-sharing-the-poem-cowgirl-filibuster-by-lisa-l-moore/, 9 Poetic Fingers http://9-poeticfingers.org/2013/07/13/, and Split This Rock Poetry Database, http://www.splitthisrock.org/poetry-database/poem/cowgirl-filibuster.

“The Dream of a Common Bookstore.”  Essay.  Los Angeles Review of Books, 20 April 2013.  http://lareviewofbooks.org/article.php?id=1596.  Cited in Shelf Awareness.

“Sister Arts:  On Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, and Others.” Essay.  Los Angeles Revew of Books, 11 February 2013.  http://lareviewofbooks.org/article.php?id=1384.  Cited in Harriet, the Blog (National Poetry Foundation), Poets.org, Feministing (three mentions).

“Anthropomorphic Harp.”  Poem.  ISSUE, the Arts Magazine of the Art Studio, Inc., Beaumont, Texas.

“Do You Have To Be Gay To Take This Class?” and “Lessons from LGBT Lit.”  Poems.  Megan Volpert, ed.  This Assignment is So GayLGBTIQ Poets on the Art of Teaching.  Alexander, Ark.:  Sibling Rivalry Press, 2013.

Landscape.” Poem.  Lavender Review 5 (Summer 2012). Reprinted in Poetry at Round Top 2012.  Round Top, TX:  Poetry at Round Top Festival Institute, 2012, 39.

“Meditation for After an Earthquake.”  Poem and visual art collaboration with artist Joel Haber. Broadsided Japan Issue (June 2011): < http://www.broadsidedpress.org/ >.

“Cinnamon Rolls,” “Acts of Devotion,” and “Baby-Daddy.”  Poems.  Sinister Wisdom 83 (Summer 2011): 60-65.

“Epiphanies Lost and Found.”  Personal essay.  The Austin Project Archive: Experiments in a Jazz Aesthetic.  Eds. Omi Osun Joni L. Jones, Lisa L. Moore, and Sharon Bridgforth. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010. 328-337.

“The Body Remembers.”  Poem.  The Austin Project Archive: Experiments in a Jazz Aesthetic.  Eds. Omi Osun Joni L. Jones, Lisa L. Moore, and Sharon Bridgforth.  Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010. 120-123.

“My Homosexual Agenda.”  Personal essay.  Burnt Orange Britannia: British Studies at the University of Texas.  Ed. Wm. Roger Louis.  London: I.B. Tauris, 2005.  866-880.

Events


READINGS:

Everyone and Their Mother:  Sibling Rivalry Press Reading.  Association of Writers and Writing Programs Conference.  The Nightlife Lounge, Seattle, Washington, February 28 2014.

Featured Poet, BookWoman Monthly Reading Series, Austin, Texas, April 11 2013.

Featured Poet, Skanky Possum Reading Series, Austin, Texas, August 2011.

 

SELECTED LECTURES / PRESENTATIONS:

Keynotes and Invited Lectures:

“Lesbian Genders,” Keynote Lecture, “Genders’ Future Tense” Conference, University of Colorado-Boulder, February 27-28 2015.

“A Lesbian History of the Sonnet,” Center for the Study of Sexual Cultures Speaker Series, University of California-Berkeley, November 4 2014.

“Poetry of Heroism:  The Poetic Origins of Feminist Theory,” Buckner Lecture, The University of North Carolina-Wilmington, March 18, 2013.

“Queer Poetics:  The Sonnet in a Lesbian Landscape,” Keynote Lecture, British Women Writers Conference, The University of Colorado (Boulder), June 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMEs5jbLjm8

“The Swan of Litchfield, Connecticut: Sarah Pierce and Lesbian Pastoral Poetry,” Plenary Address, Queer People Conference IV: New Directions in the Histories of Sexualities, 1280-1868, Christ’s College, Cambridge, UK, July 2006.

“The Honied Dew: Sarah Pierce and the Lesbian Landscape,” University of North Texas, Denton, TX, October 2006.

“Pen and Phil: Collective Biography and Eighteenth-Century Visual and Sexual Cultures,” The Queer’s English Conference, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, November 2004. 

“Queer Gardens: Mary Delany’s Sapphic Designs,” Rice University Center for the Study of Cultures, Houston, TX, April 2001; 

“Cold War Lesbianism and Literary History: Mary Renault,” State University of New York at Stony Brook, March 1999.   

“Romance, Realism and Romantic Nationalism,” The University of Colorado at Boulder, March 1998.

“Nationalism and Sexuality in the National Tale,” Miami University, Oxford, OH, February 1997;

“The Sexual Politics of Romantic Nationalism,” Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada, November 1996.

 

Conference Presentations:

“Queer Time:  Re-Dating the Romantic Sonnet Revival,” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Los Angeles, California, March 2015.

“Milton, Seward and the Sonnet of Loss,” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Los Angeles, California, March 2015.

“Women’s Land and Lesbian Landscapes in Garden History,” Disciples of Flora:  Gardens in History and Culture Conference, The University of Florida, Gainesville, Feb. 21-22, 2013.

“Virtual Delville as Feminist Research,” 18th- and 19th-Century Women Writers Conference, College Station, TX, Texas A&M University, April 2010.

“Listening to Gossip in the Queer Archive,” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies,Richmond, VA, March 2009.  Similar material presented at:  Society of American Archivists, Austin, TX, August 2009.

“Transatlantic Synaesthesia,” Modern Language Association, San Francisco, CA, December 2008.

“Portland: The Dutchess, The Museum And The Vase, Or. The Duchess of Portland in Portland,” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Portland, OR, March 2008.

“Queer Studies in Texas,” Modern Language Association, Chicago, IL, December 2007.

“Mrs. Delany and Her Circle” workshop, Sir John Soanes Museum, London, UK, July 2007. Sponsored by the Yale Center for British Art.

“Landscapes in Motion: Eroticism and Exchange Among Women Artists,” Modern Language Association, Philadelphia, PA, December 2006.

“The Sapphic Picturesque in Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics,” Clark Institute for Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, March 2000;

“Framing Sappho in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Aesthetics,” Modern Language Association, Chicago, IL, December 1999.

“‘American Tribes’ and English Feminists in the Eighteenth-Century Transatlantic World,” Modern Language Association, New York, NY, December 2002. 

“Mary Renault: The Aesthetics of Bad Politics,” Modern Language Association, San Francisco, CA, December 1998.

“Queering the Eighteenth-Century Landscape,” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, South Bend, IN, April 1998.

“Problematizing Romantic Friendship,” CUNY Lesbian and Gay History Conference, October 1995.

“The Sexual History of Romantic Friendship,” Modern Language Association, San Francisco, CA, December 1991.

 

University of Texas at Austin Lectures/Presentations:

“The Austin Project as Lesbian Archive,” Performing Lesbian Archives Conference, Theatre and Dance, March 2011.

“Sister Arts: The Erotics of Lesbian Landscapes,” British Studies Program, January 2011.

“Why Bloomsbury Still Matters,” British Studies Program, October 2009.

“Effective Teaching,” British Studies Program, October 2009.

“Listening to Gossip in the Queer Archive,” Symposium for History, Gender and Sexuality, November 2009.

“British Print Culture in the 1760s,” Institute for Historical Studies workshop, September 2008.

“Your Beauty,” Commencement Address, First Annual Lavender Graduation, May 2008.

“My Homosexual Agenda,” Faculty Seminar on British Studies, October 2003.

“‘American Tribes’ and English Feminists in the Eighteenth-Century Transatlantic World,” Flashpoints Conference in Women’s and Gender Studies, October 2002.

“Remembering 1798,” Faculty Seminar in British Studies, October 1998.

“British Studies--Lesbian Studies: A Dangerous Intimacy?” Faculty Seminar in British Studies, March 1998.

“Confessions of a Mammalian Orchid,” Response to talk by Elizabeth Grosz, September 1997.

Additional Publications


Articles in Peer-Reviewed Journals

Virtual Delville as Archival Research:  Rendering Women’s Garden History Visible.” Visualizing the Archive.  Spec. issue of Poetess Archive Journal  2.1 (2010).

''Queer Gardens: Mary Delany's Flowers and Friendships,'' Eighteenth Century Studies (October 2005).

''Lesbian Migrations: Mary Renault's English Novels.'' GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2003. pgs. 23-46.

''Acts of Union: Sexuality and Nationalism, Romance and Realism in the Irish National Tale.'' Cultural Critique, 2000.

''`Something More Tender Still Than Friendship': Romantic Friendship in Early Nineteenth Century England.'' Feminist Studies, 1991.

''`She Was Too Fond of Her Mistaken Bargain': Gender and Sexuality in Feminist Theory,'' diacritics, 1991.

“Sexual Agency in Manet's Olympia.”  Textual Practice 3.2 (June 1989): 222-233.

 

Book Chapters

“The Swan of Litchfield: Sarah Pierce and the Lesbian Landscape Poem.”  Long Before Stonewall: Histories of Same-Sex Sexuality in Early America.  Ed. Thomas A. Foster.  New York: NYU Press, 2007.  253-276.

''Teledildonics: Virtual Lesbians in the Fiction of Jeannette Winterson.'' In Grosz, ed., Sexy Bodies: Towards a Corporeal Feminism. Routledge, 1994.

 

Journalism

“Subverting the Girlie Calendar: February.”  Column. Ms. Magazine Blog, Feb. 1, 2015. http://msmagazine.com/blog/2015/02/01/subverting-the-girlie-calendar-february/

(With Paige Schilt). “Embrace Family Diversity Sooner.” Op-Ed.  Austin American-Statesman, Dec. 27, 2014, p. A16. http://www.mystatesman.com/news/news/opinion/commentary-embrace-family-diversity-in-schools-soo/njbNZ/

“The Dangers of Mansplaining Abortion.”  Ms. Magazine Blog, October 27 2014.  http://msmagazine.com/blog/2014/10/27/the-dangers-of-mansplaining-abortion/

“Homophobia is Not a Thing of the Past.” Op Ed.  Pacific Standard: The Science of Society, October 20 2014.  http://www.psmag.com/navigation/politics-and-law/homophobia-thing-past-lgbt-rights-gay-92777/

“A welcome mix of football and feminism at UT.”  Op-Ed.  The San Antonio Express-News, October 3 2014.  http://www.mysanantonio.com/default/article/A-welcome-mix-of-football-and-feminism-at-UT-5799035.php

“An Almost Unheard Low Note:  An Interview with Minnie Bruce Pratt.”  Los Angeles Review of Books, 25 August 2014.  http://lareviewofbooks.org/interview/almost-unheard-low-note.