Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

ANNE C STEWART


Courses


AMS 315F • Native American Lit And Cul

30635 • Fall 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 1.208
(also listed as E 314V)

E 314V  l  5-Native American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  Steward, A

Unique #:  34680

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  AMS 315F

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:  This course will explore the worlds of Native American literature ranging across tribal affiliations, regions, and histories.  While this literature teaches us about Native American cultures, the novels that we will read also explore cities, technology, ecology, and the challenges of living in our hypermodern world.  We will engage with essays that discuss the connections between oral and written narratives, language and thought, ideas and places, and other concepts key to understanding Native American literature, and literary studies.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts:  Silko, Leslie Marmon. Ceremony (1977); Erdrich, Louise. Tracks (1988); Robinson, Eden. Monkey Beach (2000).

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  There will also be graded reading journals, and/or in-class presentations (25% of the final grade).

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

33850 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 308

E 314L  l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

Instructor:  Stewart, A

Unique #:  33850

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: What is it about neighborhoods—those family-friendly refuges from the dangers of modern life—that make them the perfect setting for controversial novels?  In this course, we will discuss texts that explore themes of violence, insanity, and alienation playing out in the heart of suburban enclaves and isolated communities.  Our discussions will consider the ways in which these readings expose the clashing histories, cultures, and psychological states that form the volatile underbelly of our seemingly sleepy suburbs.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Native Son by Richard Wright (1940); Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut (1973); The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie(2007).

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (80% of the final grade).  There will also be a class blog that each student will contribute to regularly over the course of the term. Blog posts will take the form of reading responses, curated research materials, and creative reflections on the neighborhoods we live in (20% of the final grade).

AMS 315F • Native American Lit And Cul

30915 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 206
(also listed as E 314V)

Instructor:  Stewart, A

Unique #:  35150

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  AMS 315F

Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course will explore the worlds of Native American literature ranging across tribal affiliations, regions, and histories. While this literature teaches us about Native American cultures, the novels that we will read also explore cities, technology, ecology, and the challenges of living in our hypermodern world. We will also engage with essays that discuss the connections between oral and written narratives, language and thought, ideas and places, and other concepts key to understanding Native American literature, and literary studies.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Silko, Leslie Marmon. Ceremony (1977); Erdrich, Louise. Tracks (1988); Robinson, Eden. Monkey Beach (2000).

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade). There will also be graded reading journals, and/or in-class presentations (25% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of City Streets

44980 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 2.102

Consider the public outcry that arises when an act of violence is committed on a city street: what host of arguments is implicated in the plea to “save our streets?” Picture thousands of people flooding a major thoroughfare with signs, banners, and chanting voices: how does “taking to the street” function as a rhetorical strategy? Think about the questions of credibility, authenticity, and representation that arise around artists and artworks that respond to urban experience: what contentions and assumptions follow a claim to being “from the street?” The street is simultaneously a site of public discourse and a space that rhetoricians use to interpret and discuss the struggles of city life and civic participation. This course will focus on the city street as both a site of rhetorical action (a place where people go to speak and be heard) and a rhetorical tool (a space that is employed as a trope, a symbol, and a strategic perspective for a variety of arguments).

Our journey through the rhetoric of city streets will begin by investigating the role of the street in public discourse. We will discuss, research, and attempt to define the variety of stakeholder positions surrounding instances of rhetorical contest that takes place in and around the city street. Once we have developed a vocabulary and a background for understanding how the street functions as a site of public debate, we will move on to a consideration of the different multimodal mediums (street art, music, film, architecture, etc.) in which the city street is taken up as a rhetorical device. Finally, this course will offer students the opportunity to engage in original research and argumentation as we investigate the major roadways, boulevards, intersections, and alleys of Austin to unearth the rhetorical stakes and contests at work on the streets of our own city. Because this course includes an emphasis on the value of public and civic engagement, the writing-intensive component will include debate, oral presentation, and the development of a unique, carefully cultivated, and persuasive rhetorical voice.

Assignments and Grading

2 Research Summaries - 5%

3 peer reviews - 10%

Essay 1.1 - 5%

Essay 1.2 - 10%

Essay 2.1 - 10%

Annotated bibliography 5%

Essay 2.2 - 15%

Research proposal - 5%

Essay 3.1 - 10%

Presentation - 10%

Essay 3.2 - 15%

Required Texts and Course Readings

 Andrea Lunsford – Easy Writer

Andrea Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz – Everything’s an Argument

Additional material, including readings, audio recordings, video, and film will be provided by the instructor.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of City Streets

44655 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 2.128

Consider the public outcry that arises when an act of violence is committed on a city street: what host of arguments is implicated in the plea to “save our streets?” Picture thousands of people flooding a major thoroughfare with signs, banners, and chanting voices: how does “taking to the street” function as a rhetorical strategy? Think about the questions of credibility, authenticity, and representation that arise around artists and artworks that respond to urban experience: what contentions and assumptions follow a claim to being “from the street?” The street is simultaneously a site of public discourse and a space that rhetoricians use to interpret and discuss the struggles of city life and civic participation. This course will focus on the city street as both a site of rhetorical action (a place where people go to speak and be heard) and a rhetorical tool (a space that is employed as a trope, a symbol, and a strategic perspective for a variety of arguments).

Our journey through the rhetoric of city streets will begin by investigating the role of the street in public discourse. We will discuss, research, and attempt to define the variety of stakeholder positions surrounding instances of rhetorical contest that takes place in and around the city street. Once we have developed a vocabulary and a background for understanding how the street functions as a site of public debate, we will move on to a consideration of the different multimodal mediums (street art, music, film, architecture, etc.) in which the city street is taken up as a rhetorical device. Finally, this course will offer students the opportunity to engage in original research and argumentation as we investigate the major roadways, boulevards, intersections, and alleys of Austin to unearth the rhetorical stakes and contests at work on the streets of our own city. Because this course includes an emphasis on the value of public and civic engagement, the writing-intensive component will include debate, oral presentation, and the development of a unique, carefully cultivated, and persuasive rhetorical voice.

Assignments and Grading

2 Research Summaries - 5%

3 peer reviews - 10%

Essay 1.1 - 5%

Essay 1.2 - 10%

Essay 2.1 - 10%

Annotated bibliography 5%

Essay 2.2 - 15%

Research proposal - 5%

Essay 3.1 - 10%

Presentation - 10%

Essay 3.2 - 15%

Required Texts and Course Readings

 Andrea Lunsford – Easy Writer

Andrea Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz – Everything’s an Argument

Additional material, including readings, audio recordings, video, and film will be provided by the instructor.

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

87638 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM CLA 1.106

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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