Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Andrew G. Uzendoski


Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin

Andrew G. Uzendoski

Contact

Courses


MAS 374 • Latina/O Speculative Fictn

35280 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM GEA 114

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SOC 308D • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

44440 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CMA 3.114

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest U.S., such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the U.S., including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will engage in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also concerning the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film and television portrayals.

 

MAS 311 • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

35095 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 101
(also listed as AMS 315, SOC 308D, WGS 301)

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Latinas in the United States. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Latinas, such as family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will also explore the emergence of Latina and U.S. Third World (or woman of color) feminisms and what it means to be Latina in the United States today. We will engage in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also concerning the expressive culture of Latinas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Latinas through critical analyses of film and television portrayals.

SOC 308D • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

44538 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM GWB 1.130

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest U.S., such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the U.S., including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will engage in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also concerning the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film and television portrayals.

 

SOC 308D • Ethncty & Gender: La Chicana

44539 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GEA 127

The purpose of this course is to examine the various experiences, perspectives, and expressions of Chicanas in the United States. This involves examining the meaning and history of the term “Chicana” as it was applied to and incorporated by Mexican American women during the Chicano Movement in areas of the Southwest U.S., such as Texas and California. We will also explore what it means to be Chicana in the United States today. The course will begin with a historical overview of Mexican American women's experiences in the U.S., including the emergence of Chicana feminism. We will discuss central concepts of Chicana feminism and attempt to understand how those concepts link to everyday lived experiences. Specifically, the relationship between gender, race/ethnicity, and class will be key as we discuss issues that have been significant in the experiences and self-identification of Chicanas, such as: family, gender, sexuality, religion/spirituality, education, language, labor, and political engagement. We will engage in interdisciplinary analysis not only concerning cultural traditions, values, belief systems, and symbols but also concerning the expressive culture of Chicanas, including folk and religious practices, literature and poetry, the visual arts, and music. Finally, we will examine media representations of Chicanas through critical analyses of film and television portrayals.

 

AMS 315F • Native American Lit And Cul

30787 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 7
(also listed as E 314V)

Instructor:  Uzendoski, A Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  35075 Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013 Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AMS 315F Computer Instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course will explore the diversity of Native American literature. To better understand the many ways that Native American authors express themselves through narrative, we will read a variety of genres: drama, detective fiction, fantasy, science fiction, romance, tragedy and comedy. As a class, we will discuss where and why each author employs genre conventions. How do specific genres allow authors to dramatize and represent social, economic, and political issues? Throughout the course, we will study multiple eras of Native American literary history while also paying particular attention to each text’s specific tribal contexts. Our course texts will include novels, short stories, and plays. This discussion-driven course has been designed with both English majors and non-English majors in mind. The critical writing and analytical reading skills we will develop will help students succeed in upper-division courses in many majors across campus, including English.

Tentative texts include James Welch, Winter in the Blood; Sherman Alexie, The Toughest Indian in the World; Lynn Riggs, The Cherokee Night; Todd Downing, The Cat Screams; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Daniel Heath Justice, Kynship;and selected short stories and critical texts available in a course reader by authors such as Gerald Vizenor, LeAnne Howe, Lisa Brooks, David Treuer, Stephen Graham Jones, and Qwo-Li Driskill.

Requirements & Grading: short critical reading responses (20%); in-class reading responses and participation (10%); two 3-4 page critical essays (20% each); final 5-7 page essay (30%). Students will have the opportunity to revise major writing assignments based on instructor feedback.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

34770 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 101
(also listed as MAS 314)

Instructor:  Uzendoski, A            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34770            Flags:  Cultural diversity; Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  MAS 314            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: A sense of place will guide this exploration of Mexican-American literature. We will dedicate attention to how literary texts represent regional and national identities. Each text captures a dynamic relationship between community and space. Settings we will consider include Elysian Park in Los Angeles, the Rio Grande Valley, a fictional volcano-side town in California, and Robert Rodríguez’s neo-noir Austin. This course will address a variety of topics including the Chicano Renaissance, mass culture consumption, borderlands identity, and contemporary immigration debates. Select film and music texts will supplement our readings throughout the course. This discussion-driven course has been designed with both English majors and non-English majors in mind. The critical writing and analytical reading skills we will develop will help students succeed in upper-division courses in many majors across campus, including English.

Tentative texts include The Road to Tamazunchaleby Ron Arias; ¡Caramba! byNina Marie Martinez; Loving in the War Years: Lo Que nunca Pasó por Sus Labiosby Cherríe Moraga; y no se lo tragó la tierra/… and the earth did not swallow him byTomás Rivera; Brownsville by Oscar Casares; and selected short stories and critical texts available in a course reader including work by Helena Maria Viramontes, Ana Castillo, Gloria Anzaldúa and Américo Paredes.

Requirements & Grading: short critical reading responses (20%); in-class reading responses and participation (10%); two 3-4-page critical essays (20% each); final 5-7-page essay (30%). Students will have the opportunity to revise major writing assignments based on instructor feedback.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Music Blogs

44105 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 104

Indie music and music blogs have become intrinsically linked over the last decade—so much so that the music genre and critical venue are often synonymous in pop culture rhetoric. Indie music is both a sound and a network of blogs. Recent buzz bands, like Best Coast and Vampire Weekend, are defined as much by their web personality as by their musical output. This class will study the emergence of music weblogs as unique linguistic and visual texts. The indie music subculture will serve as our central focus by which to analyze and survey the developing rhetoric of music blogs. Our reading list will include music websites (both national and local) such as Pitchfork Media, Gorilla Vs. Bear, and Brooklyn Vegan. In the first class unit, each student will map a musical controversy across digital and print formats, discerning the rhetorical differences between sources as divergent as newspapers, blogs, social network sites, and scholarly journals. We will dedicate much of this unit to developing research techniques appropriate to digital environments. Throughout the second unit, we will interrogate the weblog genre. Students will analyze the rhetorical strategies employed by a single music blog of their choice. Coursework will then culminate with a group project in which the students will propose and create content for a new music blog.

Assignments and Grading

Major Written Assignments (55% of total grade):

Paper 1.1 – 5% 

Paper 1.2 – 10%  

Paper 2.1 – 10%     

Paper 2.2 – 10%          

Paper 3.1 – 10%

Paper 3.2 – 10%     

Short Assignments (45% of total grade):

Annotated Bibliography 1 – 10%   

Research Summary 1 – 5% 

Research Summary 2 – 5%       

Research Summary 3 – 5%     

Research Summary 4 – 5%     

Oral Presentation – 10%   

Original Content for Blog – 5%                     

Required Texts

Critical Situations. Sharon Crowley and Michael Stancliff.

The Yahoo! Style Guide. Chris Barr and the Senior Editors of Yahoo!

Easy Writer. Andrea Lunsford.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Music Blogs

43960 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 9

Indie music and music blogs have become intrinsically linked over the last decade—so much so that the music genre and critical venue are often synonymous in pop culture rhetoric. Indie music is both a sound and a network of blogs. Recent buzz bands, like Best Coast and Vampire Weekend, are defined as much by their web personality as by their musical output. This class will study the emergence of music weblogs as unique linguistic and visual texts. The indie music subculture will serve as our central focus by which to analyze and survey the developing rhetoric of music blogs. Our reading list will include music websites (both national and local) such as Pitchfork Media, Gorilla Vs. Bear, and Brooklyn Vegan. In the first class unit, each student will map a musical controversy across digital and print formats, discerning the rhetorical differences between sources as divergent as newspapers, blogs, social network sites, and scholarly journals. We will dedicate much of this unit to developing research techniques appropriate to digital environments. Throughout the second unit, we will interrogate the weblog genre. Students will analyze the rhetorical strategies employed by a single music blog of their choice. Coursework will then culminate with a group project in which the students will propose and create content for a new music blog.

Assignments and Grading

Major Written Assignments (55% of total grade):

Paper 1.1 – 5%                               

Paper 1.2 – 10%                               

Paper 2.1 – 10%                               

Paper 2.2 – 10%                               

Paper 3.1 – 10%

Paper 3.2 – 10%       

Short Assignments (45% of total grade):

Annotated Bibliography 1 – 10%                       

Research Summary 1 – 5%                           

Research Summary 2 – 5%                            

Research Summary 3 – 5%                           

Research Summary 4 – 5%                           

Oral Presentation – 10%       

Original Content for Blog – 5%                       

Required Texts

Critical Situations. Sharon Crowley and Michael Stancliff.

The Yahoo! Style Guide. Chris Barr and the Senior Editors of Yahoo!

Easy Writer. Andrea Lunsford.

RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Music Blogs

88045 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 310

Indie music and music blogs have become intrinsically linked over the last decade—so much so that the music genre and critical venue are often synonymous in pop culture rhetoric. Indie music is both a sound and a network of blogs. Recent buzz bands, like Best Coast and Vampire Weekend, are defined as much by their web personality as by their musical output. This class will study the emergence of music weblogs as unique linguistic and visual texts. The indie music subculture will serve as our central focus by which to analyze and survey the developing rhetoric of music blogs. Our reading list will include music websites (both national and local) such as Pitchfork Media, Gorilla Vs. Bear, and Brooklyn Vegan. In the first class unit, each student will map a musical controversy across digital and print formats, discerning the rhetorical differences between sources as divergent as newspapers, blogs, social network sites, and scholarly journals. We will dedicate much of this unit to developing research techniques appropriate to digital environments. Throughout the second unit, we will interrogate the weblog genre. Students will analyze the rhetorical strategies employed by a single music blog of their choice. Coursework will then culminate with a group project in which the students will propose and create content for a new music blog.

Assignments and Grading

Major Written Assignments (55% of total grade):

Paper 1.1 – 5%                               

Paper 1.2 – 10%                               

Paper 2.1 – 10%                               

Paper 2.2 – 10%                               

Paper 3.1 – 10%

Paper 3.2 – 10%       

Short Assignments (45% of total grade):

Annotated Bibliography 1 – 10%                       

Research Summary 1 – 5%                           

Research Summary 2 – 5%                            

Research Summary 3 – 5%                           

Research Summary 4 – 5%                           

Oral Presentation – 10%       

Original Content for Blog – 5%                       

Required Texts

Critical Situations. Sharon Crowley and Michael Stancliff.

The Yahoo! Style Guide. Chris Barr and the Senior Editors of Yahoo!

Easy Writer. Andrea Lunsford.

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