Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

ALLISON J HAAS


M.A., University of Texas at Austin

ALLISON J HAAS

Contact

Interests


20th century Irish literature, postcolonialism, globalization, British cultural studies, women and gender studies

Biography


Allison Haas is currently a PhD student at the University of Texas at Austin.  She recieved her BA in English and French, with Honors, from the University of Minnesota, Morris in 2010, and her MA from the Univeristy of Texas at Austin in 2012.  Her graduate research explores issues of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary Irish literature.

Courses


E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34100 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 308

E 314L  l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

Instructor:  Haas, A

Unique #:  34100

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Writing

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Ghost stories, campfire tales, urban legends. Why do we both crave and cower from the paranormal? What powerful ideas lurk beneath the surface of supernatural legends? What makes some stories so terrifying they must be suppressed? This course will seek to answer these questions by exploring the place of fear and the supernatural in literature, society, and popular culture.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, Guillermo Del Toro’s Pan’s Labyrinth, Toni Morrison’s Beloved.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade). There may also be short papers, reading journals, and in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Fantasy

44960 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 303

Contrasted with its “serious” cousin, science fiction, fantasy is often labeled a “fluff” genre that perpetuates an old-fashioned and superstitious worldview.  But the genre of fantasy has increased in popularity in recent years.  From Peter Jackson’s Oscar-winning Lord of the Rings trilogy (now expanded to include a three-part adaptation of The Hobbit) to HBO’s critically-acclaimed Game of Thrones adaptation, to the wild success of young adult series like Harry Potter and Twilight, fantasy has become a major (and extremely profitable) part of mainstream entertainment.  This course will examine the genre of fantasy in relation to its renewed critical and popular success.  We will focus particularly on the social debates that fantasy produces within fandoms, between fans and non-fans, and within larger social institutions.  Students should therefore expect to not only learn about the rhetoric of fantastic texts themselves, but to also engage with the rhetoric of debates around those texts in the public sphere.  What is the effect of mainstream fantasy on readers (particularly young readers)?  Has the success of big-budget productions re-shaped the stereotype of a typical fantasy fan as a socially inept, basement-dwelling Dungeons and Dragons fanatic, or has it simply updated this stereotype?  Has technology changed the way that fans relate to their favorite texts?  How is public discourse around fantastic texts changed by these new developments?  

As a class, we will explore numerous approaches to the question of fantasy’s “worth” for modern social relations.  Students will begin the class by researching the social history of a subgenre of 20th or 21st century fantasy, including significant authors, tropes, interventions, and public discourses.  They will then examine individual reactions to fantasy texts ranging from formal reviews to fandoms, “hatedoms,” and debates within online fan communities.  Armed with in-depth knowledge of a fantastic subgenre, experience with multiple modes of public discourse, and an understanding of rhetorical strategies, students will finally make the case for the “worthiness” or “unworthiness” of a particular fantastic text to contemporary society.       

Assignments and Grading

5% Unit 1 Subgenre Report

10% Unit 1 Subgenre Report (revised)

15% Unit 2 Rhetorical Analysis

20% Unit 3 Position Essay

45% Nine short assignments (5% each)

5% In-class activities and assignments

Required Texts and Course Readings

Everything’s an Argument by Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz (5th or 6th ed.)

Easy Writer by Andrea A. Lunsford (4th ed.)

Additional readings available online and through Blackboard

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Fantasy

44675 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 1.208

Contrasted with its “serious” cousin, science fiction, fantasy is often labeled a “fluff” genre that perpetuates an old-fashioned and superstitious worldview.  But the genre of fantasy has increased in popularity in recent years.  From Peter Jackson’s Oscar-winning Lord of the Rings trilogy (now expanded to include a three-part adaptation of The Hobbit) to HBO’s critically-acclaimed Game of Thrones adaptation, to the wild success of young adult series like Harry Potter and Twilight, fantasy has become a major (and extremely profitable) part of mainstream entertainment.  This course will examine the genre of fantasy in relation to its renewed critical and popular success.  We will focus particularly on the social debates that fantasy produces within fandoms, between fans and non-fans, and within larger social institutions.  Students should therefore expect to not only learn about the rhetoric of fantastic texts themselves, but to also engage with the rhetoric of debates around those texts in the public sphere.  What is the effect of mainstream fantasy on readers (particularly young readers)?  Has the success of big-budget productions re-shaped the stereotype of a typical fantasy fan as a socially inept, basement-dwelling Dungeons and Dragons fanatic, or has it simply updated this stereotype?  Has technology changed the way that fans relate to their favorite texts?  How is public discourse around fantastic texts changed by these new developments?  

As a class, we will explore numerous approaches to the question of fantasy’s “worth” for modern social relations.  Students will begin the class by researching the social history of a subgenre of 20th or 21st century fantasy, including significant authors, tropes, interventions, and public discourses.  They will then examine individual reactions to fantasy texts ranging from formal reviews to fandoms, “hatedoms,” and debates within online fan communities.  Armed with in-depth knowledge of a fantastic subgenre, experience with multiple modes of public discourse, and an understanding of rhetorical strategies, students will finally make the case for the “worthiness” or “unworthiness” of a particular fantastic text to contemporary society.       

Assignments and Grading

5% Unit 1 Subgenre Report

10% Unit 1 Subgenre Report (revised)

15% Unit 2 Rhetorical Analysis

20% Unit 3 Position Essay

45% Nine short assignments (5% each)

5% In-class activities and assignments

Required Texts and Course Readings

Everything’s an Argument by Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz (5th or 6th ed.)

Easy Writer by Andrea A. Lunsford (4th ed.)

Additional readings available online and through Blackboard

RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Fantasy

87660 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM CLA 0.122

Contrasted with its “serious” cousin, science fiction, fantasy is often labeled a “fluff” genre that perpetuates an old-fashioned and superstitious worldview.  But the genre of fantasy has increased in popularity in recent years.  From Peter Jackson’s Oscar-winning Lord of the Rings trilogy (now expanded to include a three-part adaptation of The Hobbit) to HBO’s critically-acclaimed Game of Thrones adaptation, to the wild success of young adult series like Harry Potter and Twilight, fantasy has become a major (and extremely profitable) part of mainstream entertainment.  This course will examine the genre of fantasy in relation to its renewed critical and popular success.  We will focus particularly on the social debates that fantasy produces within fandoms, between fans and non-fans, and within larger social institutions.  Students should therefore expect to not only learn about the rhetoric of fantastic texts themselves, but to also engage with the rhetoric of debates around those texts in the public sphere.  What is the effect of mainstream fantasy on readers (particularly young readers)?  Has the success of big-budget productions re-shaped the stereotype of a typical fantasy fan as a socially inept, basement-dwelling Dungeons and Dragons fanatic, or has it simply updated this stereotype?  Has technology changed the way that fans relate to their favorite texts?  How is public discourse around fantastic texts changed by these new developments?  

As a class, we will explore numerous approaches to the question of fantasy’s “worth” for modern social relations.  Students will begin the class by researching the social history of a subgenre of 20th or 21st century fantasy, including significant authors, tropes, interventions, and public discourses.  They will then examine individual reactions to fantasy texts ranging from formal reviews to fandoms, “hatedoms,” and debates within online fan communities.  Armed with in-depth knowledge of a fantastic subgenre, experience with multiple modes of public discourse, and an understanding of rhetorical strategies, students will finally make the case for the “worthiness” or “unworthiness” of a particular fantastic text to contemporary society.       

Assignments and Grading

5% Unit 1 Subgenre Report

10% Unit 1 Subgenre Report (revised)

15% Unit 2 Rhetorical Analysis

20% Unit 3 Position Essay

45% Nine short assignments (5% each)

5% In-class activities and assignments

Required Texts and Course Readings

Everything’s an Argument by Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz (5th or 6th ed.)

Easy Writer by Andrea A. Lunsford (4th ed.)

Additional readings available online and through Blackboard

Publications


Review of The IRA on Film and Television: A History by Mark Connelly, E3W Review of Books (2014), forthcoming.

Review of the HarryRansomCenter’s Oscar Wilde Archive, E3W Review of Books (2013): 70-1.

Conference Presentations


“‘God Damn You Grandma!’: Women and Nationalism in Irish Theater and Film.” Paper presented at The European Federation of Associations and Centers for Irish Studies 2013 Conference, June 5-7, 2013. The National University of Ireland, Galway. 

 “Queerness in a Time of Civil War: Gender Ambiguity and Political Violence in Hoda Barakat’s The Stone of Laughter and Patrick McCabe’s Breakfast on Pluto.” Paper presented at the 2013 E3W Sequels Symposium, April 2013.  The University of Texas at Austin.

 “‘God Damn You, Grandma!’: Women and Irish Nationalism in Ken Loach’s The Wind that Shakes the Barley.” Paper presented at the 8th Annual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature, September 2011.  The University of Texas at Austin.

Teaching


Courses Taught at the University of Texas at Austin

Assitant Instructor

RHE 309K: "The Rhetoric of Fantasy" in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing. Summer 2013-Spring 2014. 

RHE 306: "Rhetoric and Writing" in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing. Fall 2012-Spring 2014.

 

Teaching Assistant

E316K: “Masterworks of American Literature” in the Department of English with Prof. John Gonzalez, Summer 2012.

E316K: “Masterworks of British Literature” in the Department of English with Prof. Beth Hedrick, Spring 2012.

E316K: “Masterworks of American Literature” in the Department of English with Prof. Brian Bremen, Fall 2011.

E316K: “Masterworks of British Literature” in the Department of English with Prof. George Christian, Spring 2011.

E316K:  “Masterworks of British Literature” in the Department of English with Prof. Wayne Rebhorn, Fall 2010.