Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

BRIANNA E HYSLOP


BRIANNA E HYSLOP

Contact

Interests


Travel Narratives, British Literature, Modernism, Imperialism, Nationalism, Landscape Studies

Biography


Brianna E. Hyslop is a graduate student in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin.  She recieved her MA in English from UT-Austin in 2011 and her BAs in English Literature and Classical Civilizations from North Central College in Naperville, IL in 2009.  Her interests center around British Travel Literature, Modernism, Imperialism, and Landscape Studies.   

BOOK REVIEWS

Review of In the Hollow of the Wave: Virginia Woolf and Modernist Uses of Nature by Bonnie Kime Scott. E3W Review of Books 14 (Spring 2014).

Review of Africa as a Living Laboratory: Empire, Development, and the Problem of Scientific Knowledge, 1870-1950 by Helen Tilley.  E3W Review of Books 13 (Spring 2013).   

Review of The Wasted Vigil by Nadeem Aslam.  E3W Review of Books 11 (Spring 2011).

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

"'An Effect of One's Own Strangeness': Vita Sackville-West in the Contact Zone," presented at the British Association for Modernist Studies International Conference "Modernism Now!," London, England, 2014.

"'What a Gulf Lies Between You': Creating and Crossing Borders in Gertrude Bell's Persian Pictures," presented at the 8th Annual GRACLS Conference "Reflections: Identity After Crisis," University of Texas at Austin, 2012.

"The Packaging of Pontecorvo's The Battle of Algiers," presentated at the American Comparative Literature Association, Vancouver, BC Canada, 2011.

Courses


E 314L • Reading Lit In Context

35005 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM MEZ 1.102

Instructor:  Hyslop, B Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  35005 Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013 Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Why are readers and writers drawn to the eerily serene landscapes of utopian fantasies and the bleak wastelands of dystopian worlds? What historical, social, and cultural struggles prompt authors to imagine both seemingly perfect societies and deeply troubled ones? In this course, we will consider these questions as we look at utopian and dystopian literature, from Thomas More’s Utopia, to Suzanne Collins’s bestselling novel The Hunger Games.

Over the course of the semester, we will think about the ways in which form and genre shape our understanding of the work. We’willl also think about the conditions in which the texts were published, examining the historical and cultural contexts that gave rise to these utopian and dystopian visions. To do so we’ll examine historical documents from the period in which each work was written, as well as critical responses that reveal how the work participates in various cultural struggles.

This course will help students prepare for upper-division English classes, as well as classes in other programs and departments. Students will develop the skills of close reading and critical writing, and will be introduced to formal, historical, and cultural approaches to literary texts. Additionally, students will learn how to use the online Oxford English Dictionary as well as other resources essential to literary study.

Possible texts: Thomas More, Utopia; Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels; H. G. Wells, The Time Machine; Samuel Beckett, Endgame;Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games; course packet with critical and historical texts.

Requirements & Grading: Three short (2-3 pp.) writing assignments, 30%; research paper and revision (5-8 pp.), 35%; presentation, 10%; homework, classwork, quizzes, 15%; discussion board posts, 10%.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Protest

44245 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 206

Have you ever participated in a campus walk-out?  Signed a petition?  Have you been a part of a Human Microphone, an Occupy encampment, or a march?  Within the past few years, protest has reemerged as a way of American public discourse to an extent unrivaled since the antiwar and civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.  These contemporary protest movements have had very real consequences; some groups have been classified as “hate groups” banned from entering other countries (Westboro Baptist Church), and other movements have led to the recall of local politicians (2011 Wisconsin Protests).  On college campuses, protests have led to students and faculty members being hit by police batons, pepper sprayed, and arrested.  This course will investigate the rhetoric surrounding the current protest movements in the United States, from the Occupy Movement to the Tea Party, to think about what type of rhetoric appears to lead to successful protests while other movements fail to make it off the ground. 

In the first unit of the course, students will research and map twenty-first century protest movements in order to develop an understanding of how and why these movements emerged during particular historical moments, and study the commentary and reactions to various forms of protest.  In the second unit, we will focus on analyzing the particular types of rhetoric surrounding the act of protest, from the verbal and non-verbal rhetoric produced by particular movements—including, but not limited to, manifestos, protest songs, signs, the Occupy human microphone and hand signals—as well as the reaction to and against these movements.  We will also take into account the various venues in which protests appear, from the streets to social media and news media.  By the end of the semester, students will have developed their own sense of how the rhetoric of protest has been enacted to varying degrees of success, and will advocate a particular position within the movement they have been studying.  Final projects may take the form of a policy paper, newsletter, blog, original protest song, or video advertisement. 

Assignments

Short writing assignments -

(research summaries, short analysis papers, timeline)  20%

Essay 1.1  5%

Essay 1.2  10%

Essay 2.1 10%

Essay 2.2  15%

Essay 3.1  15%

Essay 3.2 15%

Homework  10%

Required Texts

Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz (Bedford/St. Martin’s 2009)

Easy Writer, Lunsford

Protest Nation: Words that Inspired a Century of American Radicalism, McCarthy and McMillian (The New Press, 2010)

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Protest

44130 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM MEZ 2.118

Have you ever participated in a campus walk-out?  Signed a petition?  Have you been a part of a Human Microphone, an Occupy encampment, or a march?  Within the past few years, protest has reemerged as a way of American public discourse to an extent unrivaled since the antiwar and civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.  These contemporary protest movements have had very real consequences; some groups have been classified as “hate groups” banned from entering other countries (Westboro Baptist Church), and other movements have led to the recall of local politicians (2011 Wisconsin Protests).  On college campuses, protests have led to students and faculty members being hit by police batons, pepper sprayed, and arrested.  This course will investigate the rhetoric surrounding the current protest movements in the United States, from the Occupy Movement to the Tea Party, to think about what type of rhetoric appears to lead to successful protests while other movements fail to make it off the ground.

In the first unit of the course, students will research and map twenty-first century protest movements in order to develop an understanding of how and why these movements emerged during particular historical moments, and study the commentary and reactions to various forms of protest.  In the second unit, we will focus on analyzing the particular types of rhetoric surrounding the act of protest, from the verbal and non-verbal rhetoric produced by particular movements—including, but not limited to, manifestos, protest songs, signs, the Occupy human microphone and hand signals—as well as the reaction to and against these movements.  We will also take into account the various venues in which protests appear, from the streets to social media and news media.  By the end of the semester, students will have developed their own sense of how the rhetoric of protest has been enacted to varying degrees of success, and will advocate a particular position within the movement they have been studying.  Final projects may take the form of a policy paper, newsletter, blog, original protest song, or video advertisement. 

 Assignments

Short writing assignments -

(research summaries, short analysis papers, timeline)  20%

Essay 1.1  5%

Essay 1.2  10%

Essay 2.1 10%

Essay 2.2  15%

Essay 3.1  15%

Essay 3.2 15%

Homework  10%

Required Texts

Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz (Bedford/St. Martin’s 2009)

Easy Writer, Lunsford

Protest Nation: Words that Inspired a Century of American Radicalism, McCarthy and McMillian (The New Press, 2010)

RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Protest

88000 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM PAR 302

Have you ever participated in a campus walk-out?  Signed a petition?  Have you been a part of a Human Microphone, an Occupy encampment, or a march?  Within the past few years, protest has reemerged as a way of American public discourse to an extent unrivaled since the antiwar and civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.  These contemporary protest movements have had very real consequences; some groups have been classified as “hate groups” banned from entering other countries (Westboro Baptist Church), and other movements have led to the recall of local politicians (2011 Wisconsin Protests).  On college campuses, protests have led to students and faculty members being hit by police batons, pepper sprayed, and arrested.  This course will investigate the rhetoric surrounding the current protest movements in the United States, from the Occupy Movement to the Tea Party, to think about what type of rhetoric appears to lead to successful protests while other movements fail to make it off the ground.

In the first unit of the course, students will research and map twenty-first century protest movements in order to develop an understanding of how and why these movements emerged during particular historical moments, and study the commentary and reactions to various forms of protest.  In the second unit, we will focus on analyzing the particular types of rhetoric surrounding the act of protest, from the verbal and non-verbal rhetoric produced by particular movements—including, but not limited to, manifestos, protest songs, signs, the Occupy human microphone and hand signals—as well as the reaction to and against these movements.  We will also take into account the various venues in which protests appear, from the streets to social media and news media.  By the end of the semester, students will have developed their own sense of how the rhetoric of protest has been enacted to varying degrees of success, and will advocate a particular position within the movement they have been studying.  Final projects may take the form of a policy paper, newsletter, blog, original protest song, or video advertisement. 

Assignments

Short writing assignments -

(research summaries, short analysis papers, timeline)  20%

Essay 1.1  5%

Essay 1.2  10%

Essay 2.1 10%

Essay 2.2  15%

Essay 3.1  15%

Essay 3.2 15%

Homework  10%

Required Texts

Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz (Bedford/St. Martin’s 2009)

Easy Writer, Lunsford

Protest Nation: Words that Inspired a Century of American Radicalism, McCarthy and McMillian (The New Press, 2010)

Teaching


Courses taught at the University of Texas at Austin: 

Assistant Instructor - Department of English

"Reading Literature in Context" (Fall 2013)

  • Self-designed introductory literature course.  Students learned skills necessary to advance into upper-division literature courses, including close reading, critical approaches to literary analysis, and research methods, and revision and writing strategies.

Assistant Instructor - Department of Rhetoric and Writing

"The Rhetoric of Protest" (Summer 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013)

  • Self-designed introductory rhetoric course.  Assignments included rhetorical analysis of visual and written arguments, research, and writing several essays.  

"Rhetoric and Writing" (Fall 2011, Spring 2012)

  • Introductory rhetoric course focused on research and argumentation for first- and second- year students.

Teaching Assistant - Department of English

"Masterworks of British Literature," Prof. George Christian (Spring 2011)

"Masterworks of British Literature," Prof. Frank Wigham (Fall 2010)

"Masterworks of World Literature," Prof. Brian Doherty (Summer 2010)

"Masterworks of American Literature," Prof. William Scheik (Spring 2010)

"Masterworks of British Literature," Prof. Eric Mallin (Fall 2009)

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