Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Colleen Gleeson Eils


Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Contact

Interests


Twentieth century and contemporary Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American literatures

Biography


Colleen recently graduated from the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin. She earned her MA at UT in 2010 and her BA in English at Clemson University in 2008. In April 2015 she defended her dissertation, "Narrative Privacy: Keeping Secrets in Contemporary Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American Metafictions." 

Courses


E 314V • Asian American Lit & Culture

35050 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM BEN 1.104
(also listed as AAS 314)

Instructor:  Eils, C            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  35050            Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AAS 314            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is about the power of narrative and representation in twentieth- and twenty-first century Asian American literature. We will read a variety of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama, paying particular attention to questions the texts raise about the responsibilities – and privileges – of storytellers and audiences. To do so, we will approach the course readings from various cultural, historical, and formal perspectives, putting the texts into conversation with, for example, postcolonialism, US legal history, feminism, and popular culture.

As a class, we will also consider how the cultural productions we study create and animate understandings of “Asian American,” a category inclusive of myriad national, social, and legal histories and relationships, as well as experiences shaped by citizenship, class, gender, and sexuality.

This discussion-driven course has been designed with both English majors and non-English majors in mind. The critical writing and analytical reading skills we will develop will help students succeed in upper-division courses in many majors across campus, including English.

Tentative Texts include No-No Boy by John Okada; The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston; M. Butterfly by David Henry Hwang; Dogeaters by Jessica Hagedorn; Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri; The Book of Salt by Monique Truong, and selected short stories, poems, and critical texts available in a course reader including work by Hisaye Yamamoto, Don Lee, Louis Chu, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, and Frank Chin, among others.

Requirements & Grading: short critical responses (30%); in-class reading responses and participation (10%); two 3-4-page critical essays (15% each); final 5-7-page essay (30%). Students will have the opportunity to revise major writing assignments based on instructor feedback.

AMS 315F • Native American Lit & Culture

30655 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 208
(also listed as E 314V)

Instructor:  Eils, C.            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34755            Flags:  Cultural Diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AMS 315F            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Cherokee author Thomas King writes, “The truth about stories is that that’s all we are.” In this course, we will read a selection of stories – nonfiction, short stories, poems, and novels – written by contemporary Native American authors. As a class, we will consider the questions these texts ask about stories and their real world consequences. For instance, how can stories nourish individuals and communities? How can they act as prisons? How can a story be dangerous? Most important, how can stories produce social, economic, and political changes in today’s world? We will approach our course texts from political, cultural, historical, and formal perspectives while also paying particular attention to their specific tribal contexts.

This discussion-driven course has been designed with both English majors and non-English majors in mind. The critical writing and analytical reading skills we will develop will help students succeed in upper-division courses in many majors across campus, including English.

Tentative texts include Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Thomas King, The Truth About Stories and Green Grass, Running Water; David Treuer, The Translation of Dr. Apelles; Sherman Alexie, Flight; and selected short stories, poems, and critical texts available in a course reader including work by LeAnne Howe, Joy Harjo, Gloria Bird, Paula Gunn Allen, and Simon Ortiz, among others.

Requirements & Grading: short critical responses (20%); in-class reading responses and participation (10%); two 3-4-page critical essays (20% each); final 5-7-page essay (30%). Students will have the opportunity to revise major writing assignments based on instructor feedback.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Food

44050 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM MEZ 1.118

Food is a part of our lives. Even when it is not on our plates or in our stomachs, we see it in advertisements, television, the internet, and popular culture. We are told how to eat cheaply, healthily, locally, and deliciously while at the same time being informed of the best ways to work off the food we have (or have not) eaten. This course explores how rhetoric creates meaning for and around the production, selection, preparation, and consumption of food. We will explore representations of the gendered and raced hands that prepare, and the social bodies that consume, food. Topics of discussion will include the kitchen space, comfort food, food folklore, cookbook genres (particularly ethnic foods, and texts for men), and the body. Our texts will range from cookbooks, food blogs and recipe sites to cooking shows and popular culture. Students will be expected to engage with the culture around us to discern, interrogate, and ultimately participate in rhetorical arguments made about and with food.

Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1 – 5%  

Paper 1.2 – 10%

Paper 2.1 – 15%

Paper 2.2 – 15%

Final Project/Paper – 20%

Food Presentation – 5%

Final Presentation – 5%

Short writing assignments (5) – 15%

Homework/In Class assignments (10) – 10%

Required Texts

Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and RuszkiewiczEasy Writer, Andrea LusfordNote: Students will also be responsible for printing and/or collecting various reading and visual selections provided by the instructor in class or via blackboard. These selections may include works by Susan J. Leonardi, Jessamyn Neuhaus, Alton Brown, Bobby Flay, Thomas Adler, Paula Deen, Pat and Gina Neely, Joan Jacobs Brumberg, and Maya Angelou, among others.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Food

43940 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 103

Food is a part of our lives. Even when it is not on our plates or in our stomachs, we see it in advertisements, television, the internet, and popular culture. We are told how to eat cheaply, healthily, locally, and deliciously while at the same time being informed of the best ways to work off the food we have (or have not) eaten. This course explores how rhetoric creates meaning for and around the production, selection, preparation, and consumption of food. We will explore representations of the gendered and raced hands that prepare, and the social bodies that consume, food. Topics of discussion will include the kitchen space, comfort food, food folklore, cookbook genres (particularly ethnic foods, and texts for men), and the body. Our texts will range from cookbooks, food blogs and recipe sites to cooking shows and popular culture. Students will be expected to engage with the culture around us to discern, interrogate, and ultimately participate in rhetorical arguments made about and with food.

Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1 – 5%  

Paper 1.2 – 10%

Paper 2.1 – 15%

Paper 2.2 – 15%

Final Project/Paper – 20%

Food Presentation – 5%

Final Presentation – 5%

Short writing assignments (5) – 15%

Homework/In Class assignments (10) – 10%

Required Texts

Everything’s an Argument, Lunsford and Ruszkiewicz

Easy Writer, Andrea Lusford

Note: Students will also be responsible for printing and/or collecting various reading and visual selections provided by the instructor in class or via blackboard. These selections may include works by Susan J. Leonardi, Jessamyn Neuhaus, Alton Brown, Bobby Flay, Thomas Adler, Paula Deen, Pat and Gina Neely, Joan Jacobs Brumberg, and Maya Angelou, among others.

Publications


PUBLICATIONS

Article (Refereed):

“The Politics of Make-Believe: Dissimulation and Reciprocity in David Treuer’s The Translation of Dr. Apelles,” forthcoming Winter 2015 in Studies in American Indian Literatures 26.4.

Interview (Refereed):

“‘You’re Always More Famous When You’re Banished’: Gerald Vizenor on Citizenship, War, and Continental Liberty,” with Emily Lederman, Andrew Uzendoski, and Gerald Vizenor. Interview forthcoming Spring 2015 in American Indian Quarterly, 39.2.

Interview:

“An Interview with Gerald Vizenor” with Emily Lederman and Andrew Uzendoski in E3W Review of Books, Coloring Outside the Lines: Development, Deviance, and the Domestic, vol. 14 (Spring 2014): 28-30.

Book Reviews:

Thadious M. Davis. Southscapes: Geographies of Race, Region, & Literature, in E3W Review of Books, Literary Indictments: Bodies on Trial, in Prison, & Out of Bounds, vol. 13 (Spring 2013): 61-62.

Julia H. Lee. Interracial Encounters: Reciprocal Representations in African and Asian American Literatures, 1896-1937, in E3W Review of Books, Year of Seven Billion: Population Growth, Population Control, and Popular Movements, vol. 12 (Spring 2012): 25-27.

Janet A. Flammang. The Taste for Civilization: Food, Politics, and Civil Society, in E3W: Review of Books, Broken Paradigms: Towards Sustainable Strategies & Timely Tactics, vol. 11 (Spring 2011): 29-30.

Leslie Marmon Silko. Almanac of the Dead, in E3W Review of Books, Human Interests, Historical Investments, vol. 10 (Spring 2010): 35-36.

Presentations


CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

“Fiction and Lies in Sherman Alexie’s ‘Dear John Wayne’ and Stephen Graham Jones’s Growing Up Dead in Texas.” Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) National Conference. Washington, D.C. June 2015. (upcoming)

“Formal Departure: Evading Textual Captivity in Monique Truong’s The Book of Salt.” The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS) National Conference. Athens, GA. April 2015. (upcoming)

“The Limits of Literature in Salvador Plascencia’s The People of Paper.” The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS) National Conference. Oklahoma City, OK. March 2014.

 “‘I was looking for a book:’ Audience and Translation in The Translation of Dr. Apelles.” 9th Annual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature, University of Texas at Austin. Austin, TX. October 2012.

“‘If it Weren’t for Tequila and Pretty Señoritas’: Eating the Other in Country Music.” E3W Annual Sequels Conference. Austin, TX. April 2011.

“Colors, Maps, Artifacts: Imagining Alternative Literary and Publishing Environments in ¡Caramba!” Annual Meeting of the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies (NAACS). Seattle, WA. April 2010.

“Anarchy Arrives: Robert Kaplan and the Rhetoric of Dehumanization.” Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice Annual Conference. Austin, TX. March 2009.

 

INVITED TALKS

Workshop. The Americas Project, Department of English, University of Texas at Austin. February 2015.

“Alumni Panel.” Undergraduate Scholars Program Administrators Association National Conference. Austin, TX. May 2013.

“Teaching in the Department of English.” Invited speaker, 398T: Supervised Teaching in English, University of Texas at Austin. Austin, TX. 2013.

Teaching


TEACHING (INSTRUCTOR OF RECORD)

Asian American Literature and Culture, Fall 2013

  • I designed and taught this discussion-based course to majors and non-majors. Students learned close reading, critical thinking, and research methods using Asian American literary and theoretical content.

Native American Literature and Culture, Fall 2012

  • I designed and taught this discussion-based literature course to majors and non-majors. Students learned close reading, critical thinking, and research methods using Native American literary and theoretical content.

The Rhetoric of Food, Fall 2011, Spring 2012

  • I designed and taught this rhetorical analysis and writing skills course. Students made arguments about food culture texts using theories of race, gender, and sexuality.

Rhetoric and Writing, Spring 2012, Spring 2011, Fall 2010

  • I taught the standard lower-division rhetorical analysis and writing skills course.

 

TEACHING DISTINCTION

Outstanding Assistant Instructor, Department of English, University of Texas, 2012-2013

 

UNDERGRADUATE WRITING CENTER


Consultant, 2010 - 2013

Group Mentor, 2011 - 2013

 

OTHER TEACHING EXPERIENCE (TEACHING ASSISTANT)

Young Adult Fiction and Film, Fall 2014

Interwar U.S. Literature, Summer 2011

Life and Literature of the Southwest, Spring 2010

Masterworks of American Literature, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Summer 2010

Masterworks of British Literature, Spring 2009

Fellowships & Awards


University of Texas Department of English Excellence Award, Spring 2014

MELUS President’s Graduate Student Travel Award, 2014

University of Texas Graduate School Professional Development Award, 2010, 2014

Outstanding Assistant Instructor, Department of English, University of Texas at Austin, 2012-13

Maureen Decherd Excellence Fellow, University of Texas at Austin, Spring 2013

Summer Fellowship, Department of English, University of Texas at Austin, 2011

Clemson University National Scholar, 2004-2008

Phi Beta Kappa, 2007

Professional References


James H. Cox

Professor, Department of English

University of Texas at Austin

204 W. 21st Street, B5000

Austin, Texas 78712-1164

jhcox@austin.utexas.edu

 

Domino R. Perez

Associate Professor, Department of English and CMAS

Director, Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS)

University of Texas at Austin

204 W. 21st Street, B5000

Austin, Texas 78712-1164

drperez@austin.utexas.edu

 

Julie A. Minich

Assistant Professor, Department of English

University of Texas at Austin

204 W. 21st Street, B5000

Austin, Texas 78712-1164

minichja@utexas.edu

 

Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández

Associate Professor, American Studies and Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

Chair, Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

University of Texas at Austin

2505 University Ave Stop B7100

Austin, TX 78712

ngh24@austin.utexas.edu

 

Phillip J. Barrish

Tony Hilfer Professor in American and British Literature

Director, Lower-Division Literature Program

University of Texas at Austin

204 W. 21st Street, B5000

Austin, Texas 78712-1164

pbarrish@austin.utexas.edu

Academic Appointments


Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of English, Willamette University (Salem, OR), 2015-2016

Assistant Director, Department of English Lower-Division Literature Program, University of Texas at Austin, 2013-2015

Graduate Research Assistant, University of Texas at Austin

  • Domino Perez, Center for Mexican American Studies, 2014-2015
  • Heather Houser, book project: Ecosickness in Contemporary U.S. Fiction: Environment and Affect (Columbia UP), 2013
  • James H. Cox, book project: The Red Land to the South: American Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico (Minnesota UP), Summer 2011

Assistant Instructor, University of Texas at Austin

  • Department of English, 2012-2014
  • Department of Rhetoric and Writing, 2010-2012

Teaching Assistant, University of Texas at Austin, Department of English, 2008-2010, 2014