Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Erin Cotter


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Courses


E 314V • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

34850 • Spring 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 2.128
(also listed as WGS 301)

E 314V  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

 

Instructor:  Cotter, E

Unique #:  34850

Semester:  Spring 2017

Cross-lists:  WGS 301

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  Yes

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

 

Description:  Seminal author Virginia Woolf writes “Women and fiction remain, so far as I am concerned, unsolved problems.”  What does Woolf mean by this cryptic comment, and what does it mean for female creativity?  Is there a difference between male and female creativity?  What unique situations confront female artists and observers?  This class will explore the relationship between identity, women, culture, history, and creativity.  We will explore these questions by carefully examining female authored fiction, poetry, and film while also considering each text as part of its specific historic moment.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  A Room of One’s Own, by Virginia Woolf; The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath; Brown Girl Dreaming, by Jacqueline Woodson.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade).  There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (25% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Young Adult Fiction

43250 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM JES A209A

Are you a teenager, or an adult? How do we decide when someone has transitioned from adolescence to adulthood? What does it mean that young adult (YA) books and movies such as Harry PotterThe Hunger Games, and The Fault in our Stars are wildly successful among adults and teenagers alike? Is there something immature about adults who consume texts targeted at teenagers? The vast growth of the YA industry parallels our growing cultural anxiety about determining the parameters of adolescence. Terms such as “extended adolescence” and “delayed adulthood” frame the public discussion, but how do popular texts influence these debates about contemporary adolescence? This course seeks to explore the ways in which adolescence is rhetorically structured and imagined in popular YA texts.

As a class, we will explore numerous approaches to the question of YA’s “worth” for modern social relations. Students will begin the class by researching how a public controversy is discussed both outside of and within a YA text of their choice. They will then examine individual reactions to YA texts ranging from formal reviews to fandoms, “hatedoms,” and debates within online fan communities. Armed with an in-depth knowledge of YA’s engagement with public debates, experience with multiple modes of discourse, and an understanding of rhetorical strategies, students will finally make the case for the “worthiness” or “unworthiness” of a particular YA text to contemporary society.       

 

Assignments and Grading

  • Paper 1.1 - 5%
  • Paper 1.2 - 10%
  • Paper 2.1 - 10%
  • Paper 2.2 - 10%
  • Paper 3.1 - 15%
  • Paper 3.2 - 20%
  • Short Writing Assignments - 20%
  • Presentation - 10%
  • Participation - Invaluable

Required Texts and Course Readings

  • Everything’s an Argument by Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz
  • EasyWriter by Andrea A. Lunsford
  • Supplemental readings to be provided by instructor. Potential readings include, but are not limited to the following: “What are YA books? And who is reading them?” by Imogen Russell Williams, “Introduction: Theorizing Fandom: Fans, Subculture, and Identity” by Cheryl Harris, “The Ongoing Problem of Race in YA,” by Jen Doll, and The New York Times’ Room for Debate Series “The Power of Young Adult Fiction.”

RHE 309K • Rhet Of Young Adult Fiction

43190 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM GAR 2.112

Are you a teenager, or an adult? How do we decide when someone has transitioned from adolescence to adulthood? What does it mean that young adult (YA) books and movies such as Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, and The Fault in our Stars are wildly successful among adults and teenagers alike? Is there something immature about adults who consume texts targeted at teenagers? The vast growth of the YA industry parallels our growing cultural anxiety about determining the parameters of adolescence. Terms such as “extended adolescence” and “delayed adulthood” frame the public discussion, but how do popular texts influence these debates about contemporary adolescence? This course seeks to explore the ways in which adolescence is rhetorically structured and imagined in popular YA texts.

As a class, we will explore numerous approaches to the question of YA’s “worth” for modern social relations. Students will begin the class by researching how a public controversy is discussed both outside of and within a YA text of their choice. They will then examine individual reactions to YA texts ranging from formal reviews to fandoms, “hatedoms,” and debates within online fan communities. Armed with an in-depth knowledge of YA’s engagement with public debates, experience with multiple modes of discourse, and an understanding of rhetorical strategies, students will finally make the case for the “worthiness” or “unworthiness” of a particular YA text to contemporary society.       

 

Assignments and Grading

  • Paper 1.1 - 5%
  • Paper 1.2 - 10%
  • Paper 2.1 - 10%
  • Paper 2.2 - 10%
  • Paper 3.1 - 15%
  • Paper 3.2 - 20%
  • Short Writing Assignments - 20%
  • Presentation - 10%
  • Participation - Invaluable

Required Texts and Course Readings

  • Everything’s an Argument by Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz
  • EasyWriter by Andrea A. Lunsford
  • Supplemental readings to be provided by instructor. Potential readings include, but are not limited to the following: “What are YA books? And who is reading them?” by Imogen Russell Williams, “Introduction: Theorizing Fandom: Fans, Subculture, and Identity” by Cheryl Harris, “The Ongoing Problem of Race in YA,” by Jen Doll, and The New York Times’ Room for Debate Series “The Power of Young Adult Fiction.”

RHE F309K • Rhet Of Young Adult Fiction

86260 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM MEZ 2.102

Are you a teenager, or an adult? How do we decide when someone has transitioned from adolescence to adulthood? What does it mean that young adult (YA) books and movies such as Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, and The Fault in our Stars are wildly successful among adults and teenagers alike? Is there something immature about adults who consume texts targeted at teenagers? The vast growth of the YA industry parallels our growing cultural anxiety about determining the parameters of adolescence. Terms such as “extended adolescence” and “delayed adulthood” frame the public discussion, but how do popular texts influence these debates about contemporary adolescence? This course seeks to explore the ways in which adolescence is rhetorically structured and imagined in popular YA texts.

As a class, we will explore numerous approaches to the question of YA’s “worth” for modern social relations. Students will begin the class by researching how a public controversy is discussed both outside of and within a YA text of their choice. They will then examine individual reactions to YA texts ranging from formal reviews to fandoms, “hatedoms,” and debates within online fan communities. Armed with an in-depth knowledge of YA’s engagement with public debates, experience with multiple modes of discourse, and an understanding of rhetorical strategies, students will finally make the case for the “worthiness” or “unworthiness” of a particular YA text to contemporary society.       

 Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1 - 5%

Paper 1.2 - 10%

Paper 2.1 - 10%

Paper 2.2 - 10%

Paper 3.1 - 15%

Paper 3.2 - 20%

Short Writing Assignments - 20%

Presentation - 10%

Participation - Invaluable

Required Texts and Course Readings

Everything’s an Argument by Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz

EasyWriter by Andrea A. Lunsford

Supplemental readings to be provided by instructor. Potential readings include, but are not limited to the following: “What are YA books? And who is reading them?” by Imogen Russell Williams, “Introduction: Theorizing Fandom: Fans, Subculture, and Identity” by Cheryl Harris, “The Ongoing Problem of Race in YA,” by Jen Doll, and The New York Times’ Room for Debate Series “The Power of Young Adult Fiction.”

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