Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

EMILY A LEDERMAN


EMILY A LEDERMAN

Contact

Interests


Queer and Gender Studies, Contemporary American Ethnic Literatures, Native Studies, Archival Studies, Theories of Race and Ethnicity

Biography


Emily Lederman is a doctoral student in English. Her areas of focus include women and gender studies, queer theory, and contemporary American ethnic literatures. She is writing a dissertation on representations of archives in contemporary American Indian and Mexican American fiction. Emily received her MA from the University of Texas at Austin in 2012. Prior to graduate school, she worked in secondary public schools and at an education nonprofit, and she continues to pursue her interest in education reform. Emily has taught undergraduate courses in Rhetoric & Writing, including a course she designed called the Rhetoric of Eating. Currently, she is teaching a literature course on banned books. She has also served as an Editor-in-Chief ofThe Ethnic and Third World Review of Books

Publications

Review of Our Schools Suck: Students Talk Back to a Segregated Nation on the Failures of Urban Education (2009), edited by Gaston Alonso, Noel S. Anderson, Celina Su, & Jeanne Theoharis. E3W Review of Books 12 (Spring 2012).

Review of It's Our Turn to Eat: The Story of a Kenyan Whistle-Blower (2010), by Michaela Wrong. E3W Review of Books 11 (Spring 2011).

Conference Presentations

"Seductive Patriarchy and Changing Desires in Denise Chávez’s Loving Pedro Infante (2001)," 47th Annual Western Literature Association Conference. Lubbock, TX. 2012.

"Claiming Cultural Leadership: Public Education Crises and Nuyorican Voices in Ernesto Quiñonez’s Bodega Dreams (2000)." 8th Annual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature: "Reflections: Identity After Crisis." University of Texas at Austin. 2011.

 

 

Courses


E 314V • Women, Gender, Lit, Culture

33930 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.118
(also listed as WGS 301)

E 314V  l  6-Women, Gender, Literature, and Culture

Instructor:  Lederman, E

Unique #:  33930

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  WGS 301

Flags:  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.; Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has written: “The problem with gender is that it prescribes how we should be rather than recognizing how we are.” This course will explore the relationship between rebellious women’s writing and activism. Students will consider the following questions: How do questions of gender, race, sexuality, and culture intersect within these texts? How are these texts connected and/or disconnected from contemporary social and political movements?

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Helena Maria Viramontes’s The Moths and Other Stories (1995), Toni Morrison’s Sula (1973).

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70%-80% of the final grade).  There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (20%-30% of the final grade).

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

35070 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 10

Instructor:  Lederman, E

Unique #:  35070

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Computer instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: The banning of books continues today in the United States, speaking both to the fear of certain ideas and the power of the written word. In this course, students will read banned novels, short stories, and poems across cultural contexts, pursuing the following questions: What causes a text to be labeled “indecent” or “dangerous”? How is literature connected to political and social movements?

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (2007); Junot Díaz’s Drown (1996); Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937).

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (75% of the final grade). There may also be short reading quizzes, reaction papers, and in-class presentations (25% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Eating

44990 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 2.102

The act of eating is central to human desires, ceremonies, and ethics. This course will investigate the argument “we are what we eat” and examine how the rhetoric of food consumption in the United States informs our gender, racial, class, and political identities. Today, what we eat is increasingly under scrutiny, as groups from animal rights activists to the National Corn Growers Association to the “Eat Local” movement argue about what we should and shouldn’t eat. This course will address the following questions: How do different cultures prescribe meaning to the act of eating? What are the connections between gender, sex, and eating rhetoric? How does body image impact nutritional health? In what ways does access to healthy food and nutritional information about eating vary across American demographics? How does the rhetoric of eating connect the health of people to that of animals and the environment? The course reading will introduce students to a variety of controversies around eating in contemporary American discourse. We will examine a multitude of written and visual texts, including Jonathan Safran Foer’s Eating Animals (2009), documentaries such as Robert Kenner’s Food Inc. (2008), advertisements, magazines, nonprofit websites, farmers’ market brochures, and restaurant reviews. Students will conduct thorough independent research of an eating controversy of their choice related to the following topics, among others: “food deserts,” factory farming, “slow food,” food justice, animal rights, sexuality, obesity, and body image. Sharing their research with the rest of the class, students will summarize different positions within their controversy, and then analyze the rhetoric of positions argued in written and visual texts. In addition to short writing assignments throughout the course, students will complete three major writing assignments. The third assignment, a persuasive argument, will include a multimedia option.

Assignments and Grading

Short Writing Assignments - 20%

Annotated Bibliography - 15%

Analytical Essay 1 - 10%

Analytical Essay 2 - 15%

Persuasive Project 1 - 10%

Persuasive Project 2 - 15%           

Research Presentation - 4%

Persuasive Presentation  - 6%

Homework - 5%           

Peer Reviews - Mandatory

Participation - Invaluable

Required Texts and Course Readings

Everything’s An Argument, Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz.

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference, Andrea A.Lunsford.

Course Packet---Readings in this packet may include: Jonathan Safran Foer’s Eating Animals (2009), Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma (2006), Mark Bittman’s Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating (2008), David Kirby’s Animal Factory: The Looming Threat of Industrial Pig, Dairy, and Poultry Farms to Humans and the Environment (2010), Carole Counihan’s The Anthropology of Food and Body: Gender, Meaning, and Power (1999)Paula M. Salvio’s “Dishing it Out: Food Blogs and Post-Feminist Domesticity” Gastronomica 12.3 (2012). Carole Counihan and Steven Kaplan Food and Gender: Identity and Power (1998), bell hooks’s “Eating the Other” (2009), Anita Mannur’s “Model Minorities Can Cook: Fusion Cuisine in Asian America”

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Eating

44670 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM PAR 101

The act of eating is central to human desires, ceremonies, and ethics. This course will investigate the argument “we are what we eat” and examine how the rhetoric of food consumption in the United States informs our gender, racial, class, and political identities. Today, what we eat is increasingly under scrutiny, as groups from animal rights activists to the National Corn Growers Association to the “Eat Local” movement argue about what we should and shouldn’t eat. This course will address the following questions: How do different cultures prescribe meaning to the act of eating? What are the connections between gender, sex, and eating rhetoric? How does body image impact nutritional health? In what ways does access to healthy food and nutritional information about eating vary across American demographics? How does the rhetoric of eating connect the health of people to that of animals and the environment? The course reading will introduce students to a variety of controversies around eating in contemporary American discourse. We will examine a multitude of written and visual texts, including Jonathan Safran Foer’s Eating Animals (2009), documentaries such as Robert Kenner’s Food Inc. (2008), advertisements, magazines, nonprofit websites, farmers’ market brochures, and restaurant reviews. Students will conduct thorough independent research of an eating controversy of their choice related to the following topics, among others: “food deserts,” factory farming, “slow food,” food justice, animal rights, sexuality, obesity, and body image. Sharing their research with the rest of the class, students will summarize different positions within their controversy, and then analyze the rhetoric of positions argued in written and visual texts. In addition to short writing assignments throughout the course, students will complete three major writing assignments. The third assignment, a persuasive argument, will include a multimedia option.

Assignments and Grading

Short Writing Assignments - 20%

Annotated Bibliography - 15%

Analytical Essay 1 - 10%

Analytical Essay 2 - 15%

Persuasive Project 1 - 10%

Persuasive Project 2 - 15%           

Research Presentation - 4%

Persuasive Presentation  - 6%

Homework - 5%           

Peer Reviews - Mandatory

Participation - Invaluable

Required Texts and Course Readings

Everything’s An Argument, Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz.

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference, Andrea A.Lunsford.

Course Packet---Readings in this packet may include: Jonathan Safran Foer’s Eating Animals (2009), Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma (2006), Mark Bittman’s Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating (2008), David Kirby’s Animal Factory: The Looming Threat of Industrial Pig, Dairy, and Poultry Farms to Humans and the Environment (2010), Carole Counihan’s The Anthropology of Food and Body: Gender, Meaning, and Power (1999)Paula M. Salvio’s “Dishing it Out: Food Blogs and Post-Feminist Domesticity” Gastronomica 12.3 (2012). Carole Counihan and Steven Kaplan Food and Gender: Identity and Power (1998), bell hooks’s “Eating the Other” (2009), Anita Mannur’s “Model Minorities Can Cook: Fusion Cuisine in Asian America”

RHE S309K • Rhetoric Of Eating

87655 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM CLA 0.122

The act of eating is central to human desires, ceremonies, and ethics. This course will investigate the argument “we are what we eat” and examine how the rhetoric of food consumption in the United States informs our gender, racial, class, and political identities. Today, what we eat is increasingly under scrutiny, as groups from animal rights activists to the National Corn Growers Association to the “Eat Local” movement argue about what we should and shouldn’t eat. This course will address the following questions: How do different cultures prescribe meaning to the act of eating? What are the connections between gender, sex, and eating rhetoric? How does body image impact nutritional health? In what ways does access to healthy food and nutritional information about eating vary across American demographics? How does the rhetoric of eating connect the health of people to that of animals and the environment? The course reading will introduce students to a variety of controversies around eating in contemporary American discourse. We will examine a multitude of written and visual texts, including Jonathan Safran Foer’s Eating Animals (2009), documentaries such as Robert Kenner’s Food Inc. (2008), advertisements, magazines, nonprofit websites, farmers’ market brochures, and restaurant reviews. Students will conduct thorough independent research of an eating controversy of their choice related to the following topics, among others: “food deserts,” factory farming, “slow food,” food justice, animal rights, sexuality, obesity, and body image. Sharing their research with the rest of the class, students will summarize different positions within their controversy, and then analyze the rhetoric of positions argued in written and visual texts. In addition to short writing assignments throughout the course, students will complete three major writing assignments. The third assignment, a persuasive argument, will include a multimedia option.

Assignments and Grading

Short Writing Assignments - 20%

Annotated Bibliography - 15%

Analytical Essay 1  - 10%

Analytical Essay 2 - 15%

Persuasive Project 1 - 10%

Persuasive Project 2 - 15%           

Research Presentation - 4%

Persuasive Presentation - 6%

Homework - 5%           

Peer Reviews - Mandatory

Participation - Invaluable

Required Texts and Course Readings

Everything’s An Argument, Andrea A. Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz.

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference, Andrea A.Lunsford.

Course Packet---Readings in this packet may include: Jonathan Safran Foer’s Eating Animals (2009), Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma (2006), Mark Bittman’s Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating (2008), David Kirby’s Animal Factory: The Looming Threat of Industrial Pig, Dairy, and Poultry Farms to Humans and the Environment (2010), Carole Counihan’s The Anthropology of Food and Body: Gender, Meaning, and Power (1999)Paula M. Salvio’s “Dishing it Out: Food Blogs and Post-Feminist Domesticity” Gastronomica 12.3 (2012). Carole Counihan and Steven Kaplan Food and Gender: Identity and Power (1998), bell hooks’s “Eating the Other” (2009), Anita Mannur’s “Model Minorities Can Cook: Fusion Cuisine in Asian America”

Conference Presentations


"Seductive Patriarchy and Changing Desires in Denise Chávez’s Loving Pedro Infante (2001)," 47th Annual Western Literature Association Conference. Lubbock, TX. 2012.

"Claiming Cultural Leadership: Public Education Crises and Nuyorican Voices in Ernesto Quiñonez’s Bodega Dreams (2000)." 8th Annual Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature: "Reflections: Identity After Crisis." University of Texas at Austin. 2011.