Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Kristine Kotecki


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Courses


E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34800 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 10

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Course Description:

"I think, therefore I exist. In their files. I think differently, therefore I don't exist."

Boris Miti?, Goodbye, How are You (2009)

 

"Freedom of the press is guaranteed only to those who own one."

Abbott Joseph Liebling, "Do You Belong in Journalism?" New Yorker (4 May 1960)

 

Novel ideas or shocking content in books are can lead to controversy and even censure. Whether censored by political regimes, challenged by publishing houses or groups of readers, or banned by librarians and parents, the value of a book changes once it has caused controversy. In this course, we will analyze texts that have been the object of controversy and outrage, that represent unsettling histories, and that thematize forbidden or erased histories. Some key questions we will return to throughout our discussions are the following: When do cultural productions like stories, poems and films become incendiary? What is erased and how? How is silencing represented in artful ways? Student will learn skills essential to literary study in upper-division English courses, such as research methods and critical approaches to literary analysis and writing.

This course meets the University's guidelines for a writing flag course and fulfills the Cultural Experience, Human Expression and Thought (CEHET) requirement. Students will learn how to use of the online Oxford English Dictionary as well as other resources essential to literary study in upper-division English courses.

Texts: Lois-Ann Yamanaka, Blu's Hanging; Toni Morrison, Beloved: A Novel; Dubravka Ugreši?, The Museum of Unconditional Surrender

Course packet: poetry by Guantanamo Bay detainees; stories by Danilo Kiš; supplementary materials

Relevant films like Claude Lanzmann's Shoah, Michael Winterbottom’s The Road to Guantanamo, and Emir Kusturica’s Underground will be screened alongside readings

Grading: 30%: 3 critical essays (2-4 page); 30%: 1 research paper and revision (5-8 page); 20%: Reading journal and quizzes; 20%: Presentations, regular participation and attendance; Mandatory peer review.

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

33837 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 200

Course Description:

"I think, therefore I exist. In their files. I think differently, therefore I don't exist."

Boris Miti?, Goodbye, How are You (2009)

"Freedom of the press is guaranteed only to those who own one."

Abbott Joseph Liebling, "Do You Belong in Journalism?" New Yorker (4 May 1960)

Novel ideas or shocking content in books have sometimes been silenced by institutions whose interests were challenged by these ideas. Whether censored by political regimes, rejected by publishing houses, or banned by librarians and parents, these books were deemed to be dangerous. In this course, we will analyze texts that have been the object of controversy and outrage, texts that have been challenged or suppressed for representing unsettling histories, and thematize forbidden or erased histories. Some key questions we will return to throughout our discussions are the following: When do cultural productions like stories, poems and films become incendiary? What is erased and how? How is silencing represented in artful ways? Student will learn skills essential to literary study in upper-division English courses, such as research methods and critical approaches to literary analysis and writing.

This course meets the University's guidelines for a writing flag course and fulfills the Cultural Experience, Human Expression and Thought (CEHET) requirement. Students will learn how to use of the online Oxford English Dictionary as well as other resources essential to literary study in upper-division English courses. 

Texts: Lois-Ann Yamanaka, Blu's Hanging; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Toni Morrison, Beloved: A Novel.

Course packet: poetry by Guantanamo Bay detainees; stories by Albert Maltz, Edwige Danticat, and Danilo Kiš; supplementary materials

Relevant films like Claude Lanzmann's Shoah and Jasmila bani?'s Grbavica, and excerpts from Albert Maltz and Charlie Chaplin works will be screened alongside readings

Grading: 30%: 3 critical essays (2-4 page); 30%: 1 research paper and revision (5-8 page); 20%: Reading quizzes; 10%: Presentation; 10%: Regular participation and attendance; Mandatory peer review.

Computer Instruction? Yes

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A. 

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