Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

LAURA E THAIN


Courses


RHE 315 • Intro To Visual Rhetoric

43308 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 7

Kenneth Burke famously defined rhetoric as “the use of language as a symbolic means of inducing cooperation in beings that by nature respond to symbols.”  Although the use of visual rhetoric in mass media has an extensive history, the development of new visual networks in the 20th century changed the face of mass communication: film, television, and the world wide web all rely heavily on the interplay between visual and linguistic information. Inverting Burke’s definition of rhetoric, this class will analyze how symbols work as a linguistic means of communication.  The images of our everyday life—from memes, Instagram, and Vine to film, tv, and photojournalism—will serve as our primary texts as we explore the fascinating landscape of 21st century visual rhetoric.

            As we work together to expand our understanding of this rhetorical landscape, we will practice three basic approaches to reading images: visual rhetoric as a way to do something, visual rhetoric as a way to know something, and visual rhetoric as a way to be or become something.  We will begin by examining how images function as public address. How do we communicate with each other using images?  What are these images meant to signify, and how is communicating with images different than communicating with spoken or written language alone?  We will build on that understanding by looking at what sorts of assumptions and understandings different media rely on.  How do the codes, clichés, and conventions of the visual communicate to an audience via a system of informal logic?  Finally, we will read visual rhetoric as not only descriptive but also constitutive in the composition of our every-day lives.  How does visual rhetoric shape our perceptions, our identities, and our communities?  To answer these questions, we will produce both visual and written compositions that help us further our understanding of how visual rhetoric functions as a powerful communicative force in our society.

 

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

86310 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM PAR 103

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

E 314J • Literature And Popular Culture

34070 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 10

E 314J  l  Literature and Popular Culture

Instructor:  Thain, L

Unique #:  34070

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  Yes

Flags:  Writing

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course seeks to understand the intersections of literature and popular culture from the point of view of mass readership. While studies of popular culture at large tend to focus on the advent of mass culture in the 20th century, mass readership predates mass communication by two hundred years. This course will investigate how literature represents a particular branch of mass media both before and after broadcast media. How can we read mass readership as a form of mass culture? How does broadcast media inform, interact with, and reproduce mass literature in the 20th century and beyond?

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts:  Ian Fleming, From Russia, With Love; Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest; Suzanne Collins, The Hunger Games.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor. There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations.

Quizzes/short homework assignments: 10%; 3 response papers/ blog posts, 1 single-spaced page each: 10%; 3-5 page close reading of a visual object related to a text: 20%; 3-5 page paper comparing a text across mediums (literature and film, literature and radio, etc.): 25%; 3-5 page critical response to a text: 35%; Peer reviews: Mandatory; Participation: Invaluable.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Celebrity

45030 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 7

This course will examine how the concept of celebrity shapes the way we think about our society at large.  Who are celebrities?  How are celebrities made?  How do people maintain their celebrity?  What contribution does medium, especially the advent of celebrity blogs, Facebook, and twitter, make to our 2011 conceptions of celebrity? What responsibilities do celebrities have to the public?  In this course, students will examine various histories of celebrity and map out a particular history (for instance, television, sports, cinema, or socialite) of celebrity of interest to them.  Using what they’ve learned, students will then perform close rhetorical analyses on the media surrounding celebrities.  Finally, students will examine important social issues surrounding celebrity culture.  For instance, is celebrity advocacy always responsible? What about celebrity endorsement?  Are celebrities treated fairly in the legal system? When is celebrity warranted or unwarranted?  In the final paper, students will produce intelligent social commentary on an aspect of celebrity culture that is meaningful to them.

Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1 - 5%

Paper 1.2 - 10%

Paper 2.1 - 10%

Paper 2.2 - 15%

Paper 3.1 - 15%

Paper 3.2 - 15%

Research summaries - 20%

Reading Quizzes - 10%

Texts

Everything’s an Argument. Fifth Edition. Lunsford, Ruszkiewicz, and Walters. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010.

Easy Writer:  A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009.

Stardom and Celebrity: A Reader. Redmond and Holmes. Sage, 2007.

Additional readings to be posted on Blackboard.

E 314J • Literature And Popular Culture

34917 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 10

Instructor:  Thain, L            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34917            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course seeks to understand the intersections of literature and popular culture from the point of view of mass readership. While studies of popular culture at large tend to focus on the advent of mass culture in the 20th century, mass readership of literary works predates mass communication by two hundred years. This course will investigate how literature represents a particular branch of mass media both before and after broadcast media. How can we read mass readership as a form of mass culture? How does broadcast media inform, interact with, and reproduce mass literature in the 20th century and beyond?

We will read best-sellers from Frankenstein to The Hunger Games, concentrating on the ways in which they interrogate the role of media and technology to address social, political, and economic issues. Many of these texts also exist in other forms of broadcast media: Hitchhiker’s Guide, for instance, was a BBC radio broadcast and television miniseries before becoming a movie, and War of the Worlds was famously performed by Orson Wells in a 1938 radio broadcast. Examining these productions will help us address the multimedia afterlife of published texts in popular culture.

This course asks students to engage in basic literary analysis, utilize basic approaches to media and communication studies, and develop their own writing skills. As popular culture is an essentially interdisciplinary category of investigation, the course welcomes students from other disciplines, especially communication and media studies, to incorporate their own disciplinary practices into their literary analysis. Approaches that include cross-media analysis are especially encouraged.

Texts: Mary Shelley- Frankenstein (1818); Arthur Conan Doyle- The Sign of the Four (1890); H. G. Wells- War of the Worlds (1898); Ian Fleming- From Russia, With Love (1957); Ken Kesey- One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1961); Douglas Adams- Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1979); J. K. Rowling- Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (1997); Suzanne Collins- The Hunger Games (2008).

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes/short homework assignments: 10%; 5 response papers/ blog posts, 1 page each: 20%; 3-5-page close reading of a visual object related to a text: 10%; 3-5-page paper comparing a text across mediums (literature and film, literature and radio, etc.): 25%; 3-5-page critical response to a text: 35%.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Celebrity

44305 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM FAC 10

This course will examine how the concept of celebrity shapes the way we think about our society at large.  Who are celebrities?  How are celebrities made?  How do people maintain their celebrity?  What contribution does medium, especially the advent of celebrity blogs, Facebook, and twitter, make to our 2011 conceptions of celebrity? What responsibilities do celebrities have to the public?  In this course, students will examine various histories of celebrity and map out a particular history (for instance, television, sports, cinema, or socialite) of celebrity of interest to them.  Using what they’ve learned, students will then perform close rhetorical analyses on the media surrounding celebrities.  Finally, students will examine important social issues surrounding celebrity culture.  For instance, is celebrity advocacy always responsible? What about celebrity endorsement?  Are celebrities treated fairly in the legal system? When is celebrity warranted or unwarranted?  In the final paper, students will produce intelligent social commentary on an aspect of celebrity culture that is meaningful to them.

Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1 - 5%

Paper 1.2 - 10%

Paper 2.1 - 10%

Paper 2.2 - 15%

Paper 3.1 - 15%

Paper 3.2 - 15%

Research summaries - 20%

Reading Quizzes - 10%

Texts

Everything’s an Argument. Fifth Edition. Lunsford, Ruszkiewicz, and Walters. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010.

Easy Writer:  A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009.

Stardom and Celebrity: A Reader. Redmond and Holmes. Sage, 2007.

Additional readings to be posted on Blackboard.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Celebrity

44330 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 10

This course will examine how the concept of celebrity shapes the way we think about our society at large.  Who are celebrities?  How are celebrities made?  How do people maintain their celebrity?  What contribution does medium, especially the advent of celebrity blogs, Facebook, and twitter, make to our 2011 conceptions of celebrity? What responsibilities do celebrities have to the public?  In this course, students will examine various histories of celebrity and map out a particular history (for instance, television, sports, cinema, or socialite) of celebrity of interest to them.  Using what they’ve learned, students will then perform close rhetorical analyses on the media surrounding celebrities.  Finally, students will examine important social issues surrounding celebrity culture.  For instance, is celebrity advocacy always responsible? What about celebrity endorsement?  Are celebrities treated fairly in the legal system? When is celebrity warranted or unwarranted?  In the final paper, students will produce intelligent social commentary on an aspect of celebrity culture that is meaningful to them.

Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1 - 5%

Paper 1.2 - 10%

Paper 2.1 - 10%

Paper 2.2 - 15%

Paper 3.1 - 15%

Paper 3.2 - 15%

Research summaries - 20%

Reading Quizzes - 10%

Texts

Everything’s an Argument. Fifth Edition. Lunsford, Ruszkiewicz, and Walters. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010.

Easy Writer:  A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009.

Stardom and Celebrity: A Reader. Redmond and Holmes. Sage, 2007.

Additional readings to be posted on Blackboard.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Celebrity

44095 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 6

This course will examine how the concept of celebrity shapes the way we think about our society at large.  Who are celebrities?  How are celebrities made?  How do people maintain their celebrity?  What contribution does medium, especially the advent of celebrity blogs, Facebook, and twitter, make to our 2011 conceptions of celebrity? What responsibilities do celebrities have to the public?  In this course, students will examine various histories of celebrity and map out a particular history (for instance, television, sports, cinema, or socialite) of celebrity of interest to them.  Using what they’ve learned, students will then perform close rhetorical analyses on the media surrounding celebrities.  Finally, students will examine important social issues surrounding celebrity culture.  For instance, is celebrity advocacy always responsible? What about celebrity endorsement?  Are celebrities treated fairly in the legal system? When is celebrity warranted or unwarranted?  In the final paper, students will produce intelligent social commentary on an aspect of celebrity culture that is meaningful to them.

Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1 - 5%

Paper 1.2 - 10%

Paper 2.1 - 10%

Paper 2.2 - 15%

Paper 3.1 - 15%

Paper 3.2 - 15%

Research summaries - 20%

Reading Quizzes - 10%

Texts

Everything’s an Argument. Fifth Edition. Lunsford, Ruszkiewicz, and Walters. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010.

Easy Writer:  A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009.

Stardom and Celebrity: A Reader. Redmond and Holmes. Sage, 2007.

Additional readings to be posted on Blackboard.

RHE F309K • Rhetoric Of Celebrity

87945 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM MEZ 2.118

This course will examine how the concept of celebrity shapes the way we think about our society at large.  Who are celebrities?  How are celebrities made?  How do people maintain their celebrity?  What contribution does medium, especially the advent of celebrity blogs, Facebook, and twitter, make to our 2011 conceptions of celebrity? What responsibilities do celebrities have to the public?  In this course, students will examine various histories of celebrity and map out a particular history (for instance, television, sports, cinema, or socialite) of celebrity of interest to them.  Using what they’ve learned, students will then perform close rhetorical analyses on the media surrounding celebrities.  Finally, students will examine important social issues surrounding celebrity culture.  For instance, is celebrity advocacy always responsible? What about celebrity endorsement?  Are celebrities treated fairly in the legal system? When is celebrity warranted or unwarranted?  In the final paper, students will produce intelligent social commentary on an aspect of celebrity culture that is meaningful to them.

 Assignments and Grading

Paper 1.1 - 5%

Paper 1.2 - 10%

Paper 2.1 - 10%

Paper 2.2 - 15%

Paper 3.1 - 15%

Paper 3.2 - 15%

Research summaries - 20%

Reading Quizzes - 10%

Texts

Everything’s an Argument. Fifth Edition. Lunsford, Ruszkiewicz, and Walters. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010.

Easy Writer:  A Pocket Reference. Fourth Edition. Lunsford. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009.

Stardom and Celebrity: A Reader. Redmond and Holmes. Sage, 2007.

Additional readings to be posted on Blackboard.

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