Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Lauren J Gantz


PhD, University of Texas at Austin

Lauren J Gantz

Contact

  • Office: CAL 411
  • Office Hours: Monday 10AM-12:00PM; Wednesday 8-9:00AM; By Appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Interests


Caribbean Literatures, Diaspora Studies, Trauma Studies, Archives and Archival Studies, Queer and Gender Studies

Biography


Lauren Gantz is an alumni of the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin. In August 2014, she defended her dissertation,"To retrieve what was left": Archival Impulses in Diasporic Caribbean Fiction, which examines contemporary Caribbean literature's use of archive as a literary trope for negotiating histories of trauma, cultural memory, and identity.

AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Presidential Excellence Postdoctoral Fellowship, U. of Texas 2014-2015

Decherd Excellence Fellowship, U. of Texas, 2012, 2013

Outstanding Assistant Instructor, Department of English, U. of Texas, 2011-2012

Graduate Studies Professional Development Award, U. of Texas, 2010, 2011, 2013

GLQ Graduate Editorial Fellowship, U. of Texas, 2010-2011

Finalist, Hairston Prize for Excellence in Teaching, Division of Rhetoric and Writing, U. of Texas, 2010

Department of English Professional Development Award, U. of Texas, 2008

J. Philip and Kathleen Emily Tice Graduate Essay Award, Ohio University, 2006, 2007

Department of English Travel Grant, Ohio University, 2006, 2007

Shepherd Scholar, Emporia State University, 2004-2005

PUBLICATIONS

Refereed Journal Articles

“Archiving the Door of No Return in Dionne Brand’s At the Full and Change of the Moon.” Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism. 13.2 (2015). 123-147.

“‘Nothing ever ends’: Archives of Written and Graphic Testimony in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature. 46.4 (2015): 123-53.

Reviews

"Shall We Overcome?" Review of Jafari Allen’s ¡Venceremos?: The Erotics of Black Self-Making in Cuba. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies. 18.4 (2012): 621-23.

Book Review of David Eng’s The Feeling of Kinship: Queer Liberalism and the Racialization of Intimacy. E3W Review of Books 11 (Spring 2011): 38-39.

Book Review of Paule Marshall’s The Chosen Place, the Timeless People. E3W Review of Books 10 (Spring 2010): 57-58.

Book Review of Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. E3W Review of Books 9 (Spring 2009): 14-15. 

Book Review of Amos Tutuola’s The Palm Wine Drinkard. E3W Review of Books 8 (Spring 2008): 50. 

Book Review of Eric J. Sundquist’s Strangers in the Land: Blacks, Jews, Post-Holocaust America. Philip Roth Studies 2.2 (2006):166-68.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

“Welcome to Frye Street: Marita Bonner’s Chicago Stories (1930-41),” 129th MLA Convention:Vulnerable Times. Chicago, IL. 2014.

“‘Nothing ever ends’: The Limitations of Witnessing in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao,” 3rd International Conference on Caribbean Studies: Looking to the Caribbean: Film, Literature, and Gender Studies. Milwaukee, WI. 2013.

“Blue Airmail Letters: Missing Connections, Missing Archives in Dionne Brand’s At the Full and Change of the Moon,” Emory University Comparative Literature Conference: Comparative Caribbeans: An Interdisciplinary Conference. Atlanta, GA. 2011.

 “‘¿Qué es Patria?’: De-centered Homelands and the Archive as Mother,” Caribbean Studies Association Conference: Building a New House: Toward New Caribbean Futures in an Age of Uncertainty. Willemstad, Curaçao. 2011.

“Michelle Cliff’s Abeng and Maternal Trauma: The Possibilities of Queer Affiliations,” Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars Conference: Caribbean Dislocations/Caribbean Diasporas. Baton Rouge, LA. 2010.

“Queering Heteroglossia and ‘Out-Law’ Genres: Michelle Cliff’s Clare Savage Novels within the Tradition of Lesbian Autobiographical Writing,” University of Texas Lesbian Genres Conference. Austin, TX. 2009.

Quinceañera and Familia: Alternative Visions and Recapitulations,” Southwest Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations Annual Conference. Albuquerque, NM. 2008.

“Writing through the Body: Challenges to Medical Discourse in Winterson’s Written on the Body.” NeMLA Conference. Baltimore, MD. 2007.

“Racial Struggle: Malcolm X and Anna Deavere Smith.” Nicholls State University Fletcher Lecture Series Conference. Thibodaux, LA. 2006.

“Self-Deprecation and Peter Elbow’s Democratic Classroom.” Ohio University Work, Play, and Humor in English Studies Conference. Athens, OH. 2006.

Courses


E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

33820 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 0.122

E 314L  l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

Instructor:  Gantz, L

Unique #:  33820 & 33830

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: What makes a text “dangerous” or “obscene”? Who gets to police the written word? How do we balance the desire to protect specific individuals or groups with the democratic ideal of the free expression of ideas? In this course, we will attempt to answer such questions by drawing upon a variety literary works that have at various points in history been banned or censored, as well as works that discuss censorship and its ramifications. We will engage in careful reading and analysis of plays, poems, novels, and short stories, focusing both on their artistic merits and on the historical and cultural contexts that led to their censorship.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Marie-Vieux Chauvet, Anger; Reinaldo Arenas, Before Night Falls; Christopher Durang, Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade). There will also be reading journals, quizzes, and short presentations (30% of the final grade).

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

33830 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM JES A216A

E 314L  l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

Instructor:  Gantz, L

Unique #:  33820 & 33830

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: What makes a text “dangerous” or “obscene”? Who gets to police the written word? How do we balance the desire to protect specific individuals or groups with the democratic ideal of the free expression of ideas? In this course, we will attempt to answer such questions by drawing upon a variety literary works that have at various points in history been banned or censored, as well as works that discuss censorship and its ramifications. We will engage in careful reading and analysis of plays, poems, novels, and short stories, focusing both on their artistic merits and on the historical and cultural contexts that led to their censorship.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Marie-Vieux Chauvet, Anger; Reinaldo Arenas, Before Night Falls; Christopher Durang, Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade). There will also be reading journals, quizzes, and short presentations (30% of the final grade).

E 316M • American Literature

34520 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 105

E 316M  l  American Literature

Instructor:  Gantz, L

Unique #:  34520

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course is a broad survey of American Literature from colonization to the present. We will read a few influential and powerful pieces of American writing. Our goal is to deepen students’ understanding and appreciation of these works. Some of this understanding will come with interpreting the works in historical context, so we’ll ask questions like why these texts were written, who comprised their intended audience, and how they spoke to those readers. To sharpen students’ perception of these works, we’ll also practice describing literary effects. As we read works from different genres—autobiography, fiction, poetry—students will learn relevant terms to describe the formal components of each. In this way they’ll accumulate over the course of the semester a kind of toolbox of methods and frameworks for interpreting literature. Overall, the class will encourage attentive reading and reflection. We will read slowly and carefully, with close attention to language and detail. Learning to notice, describe and analyze details in a text will make students more thoughtful readers both of these few important works and, hopefully, of books that they encounter in the future.

Texts: Ed. Nina Baym, Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Eight Edition. Course packet available at Jenn’s Copies, 2200 Guadalupe.

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes and Participation, 25%; Midterm Exam, 35%; Final Exam, 40%.

E 376M • Gndr/Sexlty In Multiethnic Lit

35953 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.344
(also listed as WGS 335)

Instructor:  Gantz, L

Unique #:  35953

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The term “queer” emerged as an identity and critical framework focused on non-normative ways of being, but in recent years LGBTQ individuals and politics have occupied an increasingly mainstream position in American culture. With successes such as the overturnings of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell and the Defense of Marriage Act, queer activists and allies have much to celebrate. Yet despite this progress, voices of LGBTQ people of color are still underrepresented in American media and political discourse. This class will bring a few of those voices to the fore, drawing on elements of critical race theory to investigate the particular experiences and cultural productions of gender and sexually variant peoples from Asian American, Latina/o, African American, and Native American communities. In order to encourage depth of comprehension and analysis, our readings comprise a strategic sampling of contemporary queer of color voices rather than an exhaustive survey. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the historical and theoretical construction of sexual and gender identities and sexual/cultural practices in distinct racial/ethnic communities. By the end of the course, students should have a clear understanding of the praxis of intersectional analysis, as well as of the nuance and variety of queer identities in America.

Texts: Monique Truong, The Book of Salt. Mariner, 2004 • Achy Obejas, Memory Mambo. Cleis Press, 1996 • Shyam Selvadurai, The Hungry Ghosts. Doubleday Canada, 2013 • Sharon Bridgforth, Love Conjure/Blues. RedBone Press, 2005 • Qwo-Li Driskill, Walking with Ghosts. Salt Publishing, 2005 •Additional readings available in course packet.

Requirements & Grading: In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from me to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise major essays, and to read and discuss your peers' work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work.

2 pg. Critical Responses (x4), 20%; 5-7 pg. Midterm Essay, 20%; 8-10 pg. Final Essay, 40%; Presentations, 10%; Reading quizzes, 10%; and participation.

This course will not have a final or midterm exam.

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

35175 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 2.122

Instructor:  Gantz, L

Unique #:  35175

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description:

“The dirtiest book of all is the expurgated book.” –Walt Whitman

“An idea that is not dangerous is not worthy of being called an idea at all.”—Oscar Wilde

What makes a text “dangerous” or “dirty”? Who gets to police the written word? How do we balance the desire to protect specific readers with the democratic ideal of the free expression of ideas? In this course, we will attempt to answer such questions by drawing upon a variety of literary works that have at various points in history been deemed dangerous or obscene, as well as works that discuss censorship and its ramifications. We will engage in careful reading and analysis of plays, poems, and novels, focusing both on their artistic merits and on the historical and cultural contexts that led to their censorship.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of literature at a college level. To that end, our readings and written assignments will focus on three goals central to preparing for the English major:

  1. Students will learn about and practice close reading of literary texts.
  2. Students will develop a broad-based vocabulary of useful literary and critical terms and will learn how to use apply those terms to arguments about literature.
  3. Students will practice researching literary history and criticism of texts, and learn to incorporate their research into written analyses of literature.

Requirements & Grading: 30%: 3 critical essays (2-4 page); 30%: 1 research paper and revision (5-8 page); 20%: Reading journal and quizzes; 20%: Presentations, regular participation and attendance; Mandatory peer review.

Possible texts include: “Good Country People” by Flannery O’Connor; Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman; Before Night Falls by Reinaldo Arenas; Anger by Marie Chauvet; Woman at Point Zero by Nawal el Saadawi; Sister Mary Ignatius Explains it All for You by Christopher Durang; secondary readings.

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34940 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GEA 127

Instructor:  Jewell, B            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34940            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: In this course, we will try to discover how and why literary representations of violence, sex and desire can sometimes be so threatening – so powerful – that they provoke people to stamp them out of existence. Understanding both the socio-historical contexts that produce such controversial texts and the cultures that demand they be censored will position us to see tensions and connections between morals, desires, and creative expression. In what ways might moralism or the definition of a limit, a too-far-ness, be an expression of the same desires it seeks to snuff out? Though our analysis will necessarily draw on material beyond the texts in question, our primary endeavors in this class will be to cultivate close reading skills, and to develop arguments based on sustained engagements with our texts.

This course helps students prepare for upper-division classes in English and other majors by focusing on close reading and critical writing, and by introducing formal, historical, and cultural approaches to literary texts. Students will learn how to use the online Oxford English Dictionary as well as other resources essential to literary study.

Possible texts include: Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov; The Merchant of Venice, William Shakespeare; I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou; Beloved, Toni Morrison; Tropic of Cancer, Henry Miller; and,selections from Marquis de Sade and Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales.

Requirements & Grading: Two 4-pg. essays: 30%; One revision: 15%; One 6-pg. essay: 25%; Short papers and Informal Writing assignments: 20%; Attendance and Participation: 10%.

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

87637 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM BEN 1.108

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34615 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM PAR 308

Instructor:  Gantz, L            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34615            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: “The dirtiest book of all is the expurgated book.” –Walt Whitman

“An idea that is not dangerous is not worthy of being called an idea at all.”—Oscar Wilde

What makes a text “dangerous” or “dirty”? Who gets to police the written word? How do we balance the desire to protect specific individuals or groups with the democratic ideal of the free expression of ideas? In this course, we will attempt to answer such questions by drawing upon a variety of literary works that have at various points in history been deemed dangerous or obscene, as well as works that discuss censorship and its ramifications. We will engage in careful reading and analysis of plays, poems, and novels, focusing both on their artistic merits and on the historical and cultural contexts that led to their censorship.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of literature at a college level. To that end, our readings and written assignments will focus on three goals central to preparing for the English major:

 

  1. Students will learn about and practice close reading of literary texts.
  2. Students will develop a broad-based vocabulary of useful literary and critical terms and will learn how to use apply those terms to arguments about literature.

      3.   Students will practice researching literary history and criticism of texts, and learn to incorporate their research into written analyses of literature.

Possible texts include: Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman; Love, Anger, Madness by Marie Chauvet; Before Night Falls by Reinaldo Arenas; Woman at Point Zero by Nawal el Saadawi; selections from Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie; Sister Mary Ignatius Explains it All for You by Christopher Durang; course packet with secondary readings.

Requirements & Grading: Grading: 30%: 3 critical essays (2-4 page); 30%: 1 research paper and revision (5-8 page); 20%: Reading journal and quizzes; 20%: Presentations, regular participation and attendance; Mandatory peer review.

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34544 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BEN 1.104

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: “The dirtiest book of all is the expurgated book.” –Walt Whitman

“An idea that is not dangerous is not worthy of being called an idea at all.”—Oscar Wilde

What makes a text “dangerous” or “dirty”? Who gets to police the written word? How do we balance the desire to protect specific individuals or groups with the democratic ideal of the free expression of ideas? In this course, we will attempt to answer such questions by drawing upon a variety of literary works that have at various points in history been deemed dangerous or obscene, as well as works that discuss censorship and its ramifications. We will engage in careful reading and analysis of plays, poems, and novels, focusing both on their artistic merits and on the historical and cultural contexts that led to their censorship.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of literature at a college level.  To that end, our readings and written assignments will focus on three goals central to preparing for the English major:

 

  1. Students will learn about and practice close reading of literary texts.
  2. Students will develop a broad-based vocabulary of useful literary and critical terms and will learn how to use apply those terms to arguments about literature.

      3.  Students will practice researching literary history and criticism of texts, and learn to incorporate their research into written analyses of literature.

Possible texts include: Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman; Lord of the Flies by William Golding; The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison; Woman at Point Zero by Nawal el Sadaawi; Sister Mary Ignatius Explains it All for You by Christopher Durang; course packet with secondary readings.

Requirements & Grading: Grading: 30%: 3 critical essays (2-4 page); 30%: 1 research paper and revision (5-8 page); 20%: Reading journal and quizzes; 20%: Presentations, regular participation and attendance; Mandatory peer review.

Teaching


St. Edwards University

Rhetoric and Composition II: Fall 2015

Primary Instructor

Designed and taught course to undergraduates through the department of Literature, Writing, and Rhetoric. Students learned skills and vocabularies necessary for rhetorical analysis, improved their information literacy, constructed research projects, and engaged in multimodal revision.

University of Texas at Austin 

Asian American Literature and Culture: Spring 2016                                              

Designed and am currently teaching this course to undergraduates through the Department of English. Students will gain skills necessary for literary analysis, in addition to field-specific research in Asian American studies. Students will consider how authors past and present have conceptualized Asian American identity.

Banned Books and Novel Ideas: Fall 2011, Fall 2012, 2013-2014, Fall 2015

Primary Instructor

Designed and taught this course to undergraduates through the English Department. Students learned skills necessary for literary study in upper-division English courses, including: close reading, critical and theoretical approaches to literary analysis, research methods, and writing strategies.  

Masterworks of American Literature: Spring 2015

Primary Instructor

Designed and taught this survey course to undergraduates through the Department of English. Students gained an understanding of American literature from colonization to the present, focusing on major authors, literary movements, and their historical contexts.  

Queer Ethnicities: Gender/Sexuality in Multiethnic Literatures: Fall 2014

Primary Instructor

Designed and taught this course to advanced undergraduates through the Department of English. Students learned to conduct intersectional literary analysis and increased their understanding of queer and critical race theories.    

Rhetoric and Writing: 2008-2009, Summer 2013

Primary Instructor

Taught this course to undergraduates through the Division of Rhetoric and Writing. Students read and performed rhetorical analysis of written arguments, learned research methods, and wrote essays.                 

The Rhetoric of Protest: 2009-2010

Primary Instructor

Designed and taught this course to undergraduates through the Division of Rhetoric and Writing. Students performed rhetorical analysis of written and visual arguments, learned research methods, and wrote essays.

Ohio University                                                                                           

Women and Writing: The Female Hero: Winter 2007, Spring 2007

Primary Instructor

Designed and taught this course to upper-division undergraduates through the English Department. Students engaged in literary analysis, argumentative writing, and learned research methods.

Writing and Reading: Native American Literature: Fall 2006

Primary Instructor

Designed and taught this course to undergraduates through the English Department. Students engaged in literary analysis and argumentative writing, and learned research methods.

Writing and Rhetoric II: Summer 2006

Primary Instructor

Designed and taught this course to undergraduates through the English Department. Students performed rhetorical analysis of written and visual arguments, learned research methods, and wrote essays.

Writing and Rhetoric I: 2005-2006

Primary Instructor

Taught this course to undergraduates through the English Department. Students read and rhetorically analyzed written texts, learned research methods, and wrote essays.

Emporia State University                                                                                                     

Composition II: Spring 2005

Primary Instructor

Taught this course to undergraduates through the English Department. Using stasis theory, students learned how to write a variety of essays, including descriptive, argumentative, and persuasive.