Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

MEREDITH COFFEY


Assistant Instructor, Department of English
MEREDITH COFFEY

Contact

Interests


Contemporary Anglophone African Fiction, Contemporary American Indian Fiction, Human Rights, Nations and Self-Determination

Biography


Meredith Coffey is a PhD student in the Department of English at the University of Texas at Austin. She received her MA in English from UT-Austin in 2012 and her BA in Comparative Literature & Literary Theory from the University of Pennsylvania in 2009. Her current research focuses on conceptions of nationalism, sovereignty, and separatism in contemporary Nigerian and American Indian fiction. 

PUBLICATIONS

“‘She is Waiting’: Political Allegory and the Specter of Secession in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun.” Research in African Literatures 45.2 (Summer 2014): 63-85.

Review of Americanah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. E3W Review of Books (Spring 2014).

Review of There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra, Chinua Achebe. E3W Review of Books 13 (Spring 2013).

Review of Delaware Tribe in a Cherokee Nation, Brice Obermeyer.  Studies in American Indian Literature 24.2 (2012).

Review of Movements, Borders, and Identities in Africa, ed. Toyin Falola and Aribidesi Usman.  E3W (Ethnic and Third World) Review of Books 12 (Spring 2012).

With Matt Cohen, review of Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape, ed. Joel W. Martin and Mark A. Nicholas.  Journal of American Studies 46.1 (2012).

Review of Abolitionism and Imperialism in Britain, Africa, and the Atlantic, ed. Derek Peterson.  E3W (Ethnic and Third World) Review of Books 11 (Spring 2011). 

PRESENTATIONS

“‘She is Waiting’: Political Allegory and the Specter of Secession in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun,” Workshop on Global Law & Economic Policy, Institute for Global Law & Policy, Harvard University, Doha, Qatar. January 2013.

“‘I Just Don’t Want You Passing Judgments and Making Decisions for Women in Africa’: The Authority to Speak on Female Genital Cutting in Pede Hollist’s So the Path Does Not Die,” Annual Graduate Student Conference in Comparative Literature, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.  October 2012.

“‘The Revenant is Going to Come’: The Spectral Spatialization of Biafra in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun,” Annual Africanist Graduate Student Research Conference, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.  October 2011.

“More than the Story of ‘The White Woman of the Genesee’: A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison as Property Claim,” Department of Modern Languages and Literatures Annual Graduate Student Conference, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.  February 2011.

HONORS AND AWARDS

Graduate Studies Professional Development Award, The University of Texas at Austin, 2011

Phi Kappa Phi, The University of Texas at Austin, 2011

Es’kia Mphahlele African Studies Prize, University of Pennsylvania, 2010

Phi Beta Kappa, University of Pennsylvania, 2010

Courses


E 314J • Literature And Film

33810 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM FAC 9

E 314J  l  1-Literature and Film

Instructor:  Coffey, M

Unique #:  33810

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: From fantastic tales of alien invasion to alarmingly plausible narratives of totalitarianism, dystopian visions have captured our imaginations for centuries. What is the lure of these often disturbing inventions, and how can they offer distinct means of analyzing our current perceptions and realities? By investigating the dystopic in contemporary literature and film, we will explore issues like genre, class, race, gender, authority, representation, the environment, and globalization.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale (1985); James McTeigue, dir., V for Vendetta (2005); Nnedi Okorafor, Lagoon (2014).

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade). There will also be short reaction papers and an in-class presentation (together comprising 30% of the final grade).

E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

35075 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 9

Instructor:  Coffey, M

Unique #:  35075

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Computer Instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Violence, social inequality, anarchy, authoritarianism, poverty, disease, natural disaster, manmade disaster: what makes a place truly dangerous, and for which people? And how can books that merely depict dangerous places seem so threatening that they themselves are deemed too risky for certain audiences? With a broad understanding of what might constitute “danger,” we will investigate these and other questions through reading banned fiction set in dangerous places around the world.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Sherman Alexie, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven (1993); Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis (2004); Chris Abani, GraceLand (2005).

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (such that altogether, the essays comprise 75% of the final grade). There will also be reaction papers and in-class presentations (together comprising 25% of the final grade).

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Tourism

45035 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 9

Despite recent global financial crises, the tourism industry has flourished, expanding to include new forms like ecotourism, medical tourism, space tourism, voluntourism, slum tourism, disaster tourism, sex tourism, wildlife tourism, drug tourism, cultural tourism, dark tourism, and birth tourism—to name just a few of the emerging modes through which tourists hope to view and/or experience something “foreign.” Examining this unprecedented growth in the industry, the course will investigate issues like the relationship between tourism and authenticity, tourism and local economies, and tourism and power dynamics. In conjunction with these broader inquiries, students will also pursue a more specific topic of their own choosing. Consider, for example: does Austin’s music scene benefit from increasing SXSW attendance each year, or might this growth in popularity erode the city’s unique character? Do European volunteer teachers in sub-Saharan Africa provide unique educational services to communities in need, or is their inevitable departure too disruptive to the students they intend to help? Should curators maintain Auschwitz to encourage visitors, or should they abandon the tragic Holocaust site to natural decay? Beginning with a selection of readings that introduces the growing field of tourism studies, the course will ask students to research historical context and current arguments surrounding a relevant debate. As the course progresses, students will continue to engage with their controversies, analyzing rhetorical appeals of texts like newspaper editorials, travel magazine articles, blog posts, print and video ads, and short documentary films. The final project may take one of a number of forms, including that of a travelogue article, a critical essay, or a multimedia project.

Assignments and Grading

Research Summaries (5) - 20%

Annotated Bibliography - 10%

Rhetorical Analysis Essay - 10%

Rhetorical Analysis Essay Revised - 15%

Final Project Proposal - 10%

Final Project - 10%

Final Project Presentation - 10%

Final Project Analysis Paper - 15%

Required Texts and Course Readings

Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

Andrea Lunsford, Easy Writer

Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place

Other readings will be available in a course packet, which will include work by authors such as: environmental writer David Nicholson-Lord; postcolonial theorist Frantz Fanon; Lara Week, associate producer of the arts group Tribal Soul; Omar Mouffakir, founder of the International Centre for Peace through Tourism Research; Peter M. Burns, Director of the Centre for Tourism Policy Studies; political economist Fabian Frenzel; and cultural tourism scholar Michel Picard.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Tourism

44715 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 6

Despite recent global financial crises, the tourism industry has flourished, expanding to include new forms like ecotourism, medical tourism, space tourism, voluntourism, slum tourism, disaster tourism, sex tourism, wildlife tourism, drug tourism, cultural tourism, dark tourism, and birth tourism—to name just a few of the emerging modes through which tourists hope to view and/or experience something “foreign.” Examining this unprecedented growth in the industry, the course will investigate issues like the relationship between tourism and authenticity, tourism and local economies, and tourism and power dynamics. In conjunction with these broader inquiries, students will also pursue a more specific topic of their own choosing. Consider, for example: does Austin’s music scene benefit from increasing SXSW attendance each year, or might this growth in popularity erode the city’s unique character? Do European volunteer teachers in sub-Saharan Africa provide unique educational services to communities in need, or is their inevitable departure too disruptive to the students they intend to help? Should curators maintain Auschwitz to encourage visitors, or should they abandon the tragic Holocaust site to natural decay? Beginning with a selection of readings that introduces the growing field of tourism studies, the course will ask students to research historical context and current arguments surrounding a relevant debate. As the course progresses, students will continue to engage with their controversies, analyzing rhetorical appeals of texts like newspaper editorials, travel magazine articles, blog posts, print and video ads, and short documentary films. The final project may take one of a number of forms, including that of a travelogue article, a critical essay, or a multimedia project.

Assignments and Grading

Research Summaries (5) - 20%

Annotated Bibliography - 10%

Rhetorical Analysis Essay - 10%

Rhetorical Analysis Essay Revised - 15%

Final Project Proposal - 10%

Final Project - 10%

Final Project Presentation - 10%

Final Project Analysis Paper - 15%

Required Texts and Course Readings

Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

Andrea Lunsford, Easy Writer

Jamaica Kincaid, A Small Place

Other readings will be available in a course packet, which will include work by authors such as: environmental writer David Nicholson-Lord; postcolonial theorist Frantz Fanon; Lara Week, associate producer of the arts group Tribal Soul; Omar Mouffakir, founder of the International Centre for Peace through Tourism Research; Peter M. Burns, Director of the Centre for Tourism Policy Studies; political economist Fabian Frenzel; and cultural tourism scholar Michel Picard.

RHE F306 • Rhetoric And Writing

87595 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM BEN 1.102

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.