Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

RACHEL C MAZIQUE


Courses


E 314J • Lit, Visual Cul & Deaf Studies

35012 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 9

Instructor:  Mazique, R

Unique #:  35012

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Flags:  Writing

Computer Instruction: 

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: From Harry Potter to the off-Broadway play, Tribes, we will examine popular literature and its transference to visual media. Students will analyze the relationship between literature and the popular imaginary as they explore what happens in the shifts from and or between the written word and the big screen, stage, or semi-graphic novel.  As we compare texts, we will analyze what the additions and deletions of plot points, characters, and other ‘integral’ aspects of a text mean for the stories that get told. Students will also explore language play across the “hearing line” (the invisible boundary separating deaf and hearing people).

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling; Tribes by Nina Raine; Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (3-4 page Close Reading of language play in Tribes 15%; 5-6 page Research paper into the historical and cultural contexts of In This Sign 25%; 4-6 page Critical Analysis of any assigned text in relation to the hearing line and its visual adaptation 30%; 1-page Response Papers, 3 times throughout course 10%; Reading Quizzes and classroom participation 10%; Weekly Discussion/Written Observations 10%). Grades will include +/- and will be determined at the midterm and at the final. Students may also check on their progress with the instructor during office hours—for help evaluating their work in between these two checkpoints.

E 314J • Lit, Visual Cul & Deaf Studies

35150 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 7

Instructor:  Mazique, R

Unique #:  35150

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Although popular culture is now an area of PhD study, craftsmen of “the popular” go back a long way, in the form of wedding ceremonies, for example, not to mention literature’s first pop culture superstar: William Shakespeare. From The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to Harry Potter to the off-Broadway play Tribes, we will examine the ways in which popular literature creates visual worlds, as well as the relationship between the imagined visual worlds of printed text and their transference to visual media. Students will analyze the relationship between literature and the popular imaginary in the form of musicals, films, artwork, and the stage. We will explore what happens in the shifts from and or between the written word and the big screen, stage, or semi-graphic novel.  In comparing texts to their remakes, we will analyze what the additions and deletions of plot points, characters, and other ‘integral’ aspects of a text mean for the stories that get told. Third, we will explore language play across the “hearing line” (the invisible boundary separating deaf and hearing people) and how language glosses are conveyed on the page and then translated into moving images.

The broad goals of this course will be to introduce students to the basic tools of literary analysis, familiarize them with some of the major theoretical trends in literary, pop culture, and film studies, and to develop students’ own critical writing. We will discuss the relationship between form and content, and students will learn to close read texts/films and other media for both historic context and cultural significance. In order to do so, we will first analyze the literary text, conducting research about a text’s contexts, and then extend our inquiry to the multimedia versions. No expertise in theory will be presumed. The course will help students prepare for upper-division English classes (and a range of upper-division courses in other departments) with the development of skills in close reading, critical writing, and research. As this is a writing flag course, students will write and revise three papers in addition to periodic reading responses. The major writing assignments will build upon each other as students learn to close read, apply close readings to the researched contexts and, finally, do comparative work between print and multimedia.

Tentative Reading List:

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Czubek Todd A. and Janey Greenwald. “Understanding Harry Potter: Parallels to the Deaf World.” Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education 10.4 (Fall 2005): 442-450. Web.

Tribes by Nina Raine

Brantley, Ben. “World of Silence and Not Listening: ‘Tribes,’ by Nina Raine, at the Barrow Street Theater.” The New York Times. Theater Review. 4 March 2012. Web.

Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick

Minzesheimer, Bob. “Brian Selznick is ‘Wonderstruck’ by Novel and Movie.” USA Today. 2 Sept 2011. Web.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Krentz, Christopher. "Exploring the 'Hearing Line': Deafness, Laughter, and Mark Twain," in Disability Studies: Enabling the Humanities. ed. Brenda Brueggeman, Sharon Snyder, and Rosemarie Garland Thomson, MLA Press (2002).

In This Sign by Joanne Greenberg

Viewing of Emmy-award winning remake (for best director): Love is Never Silent

Grading and Requirements (tentative): Weekly Discussion/Written Observations 10%; Reading Quizzes and classroom participation 15%; 1-page Response Papers, 5 times throughout course 15%; 3-4 page Close Reading of language play in Tribes 15%; 5-6 page Research paper into the historical and cultural contexts of In This Sign 20%; 6-7 page Critical Analysis of any assigned text in relation to the hearing line and its visual adaptation 25%.

Grades will include +/- and will be determined at the midterm and at the final. Students may also check in with the instructor on their progress and for help evaluating their work in between these two checkpoints during office hours.

RHE 309K • Disability In Pop Culture

44320 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 6

Pop culture simultaneously works to entrench, subvert, and transform the meanings of (dis)ability to varying degrees of success. From movies like A Beautiful Mind and Mr. Holland’s Opus to documentaries like Murderball, to the rhetoric of the beauty industry, and classic literature like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, controversies abound. The rhetoric of “the supercrip” is pervasive in a variety of media including shows like Little People, Big World; Switched at Birth; “human interest” news reports; and “Just Do It”™ Nike commercials.

In this course, students will focus on analyzing the relationship between pop culture and rhetoric. Their analyses will examine public disagreements about various issues such as: How do popular (mis)representations of “the supercrip” convince us to make political decisions regarding accessibility, advocacy, education, and/or social policy? How can we evaluate arguments that not only depict (dis)abled people as “heroic” but also those that portray the converse: the “grotesque unfortunate” deserving of “pity” and “help”? How do these arguments address questions of basic human rights, needs, drives and “eugenics rhetoric”? Will children (and adults) make political decisions based on recurrent thematic representations of “disability” in pop culture, and, is that a good or bad influence?

Beginning with a selection of readings that introduce disability theory, students will conduct research to explore a controversy of their choice on (dis)ability in pop culture.  Throughout, students will engage with their controversy, analyzing editorials, print and video advertisements, and other contemporary portrayals of “the supercrip” in pop culture to analyze rhetorical appeals.  The last unit will focus on multimodal arguments; students will create a multimodal composition that takes a position on the representations of bodies and abilities.

Assignments and Grading

- One annotated bibliography (with peer review and additional revision)

- One 4-7 page visual rhetorical analysis (with peer review and additional revision)

- One group argument project using multimedia (with presentation and revision)

- Three 1-page research summaries posted to the class wiki and short reading quizzes

Grades in this course are determined through analysis and evaluation of student work (both the products and the overall process) via the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work with respect to the student’s development across six dimensions of learning: independence, knowledge, skills, use of prior and emerging experience, reflectiveness, and originality. Students must demonstrate growth across the five course strands: presentation, argumentation, writing process, digital literacy, and research. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record website: http://www.learningrecord.org/.

Required Texts

Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities (UT Custom Edition)Stancliff and Crowley

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference Andrea A. Lunsford

Course packet with selections from disability theory/rhetoric such as: “Seeing the Disabled: Visual Rhetorics of Disability in Popular Photography” by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson; “Does Language Disable People?” by Deborah Marks; “Disability, Genetics and Eugenics” by Tom Shakespeare; “Disabled in Images and Language” by Margaret Taylor

RHE 309K • Disability In Pop Culture

44080 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 9

Pop culture simultaneously works to entrench, subvert, and transform the meanings of (dis)ability to varying degrees of success. From movies like A Beautiful Mind and Mr. Holland’s Opus to documentaries like Murderball, to the rhetoric of the beauty industry, and classic literature like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, controversies abound. The rhetoric of “the supercrip” is pervasive in a variety of media including shows like Little People, Big World; Switched at Birth; “human interest” news reports; and “Just Do It”™ Nike commercials.

In this course, students will focus on analyzing the relationship between pop culture and rhetoric. Their analyses will examine public disagreements about various issues such as: How do popular (mis)representations of “the supercrip” convince us to make political decisions regarding accessibility, advocacy, education, and/or social policy? How can we evaluate arguments that not only depict (dis)abled people as “heroic” but also those that portray the converse: the “grotesque unfortunate” deserving of “pity” and “help”? How do these arguments address questions of basic human rights, needs, drives and “eugenics rhetoric”? Will children (and adults) make political decisions based on recurrent thematic representations of “disability” in pop culture, and, is that a good or bad influence?

Beginning with a selection of readings that introduce disability theory, students will conduct research to explore a controversy of their choice on (dis)ability in pop culture.  Throughout, students will engage with their controversy, analyzing editorials, print and video advertisements, and other contemporary portrayals of “the supercrip” in pop culture to analyze rhetorical appeals.  The last unit will focus on multimodal arguments; students will create a multimodal composition that takes a position on the representations of bodies and abilities.

Assignments and Grading

- One annotated bibliography (with peer review and additional revision)

- One 4-7 page visual rhetorical analysis (with peer review and additional revision)

- One group argument project using multimedia (with presentation and revision)

- Three 1-page research summaries posted to the class wiki and short reading quizzes

Grades in this course are determined through analysis and evaluation of student work (both the products and the overall process) via the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work with respect to the student’s development across six dimensions of learning: independence, knowledge, skills, use of prior and emerging experience, reflectiveness, and originality. Students must demonstrate growth across the five course strands: presentation, argumentation, writing process, digital literacy, and research. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record website: http://www.learningrecord.org/.

Required Texts

Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities (UT Custom Edition) Stancliff and Crowley

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference Andrea A. Lunsford

Course packet with selections from disability theory/rhetoric such as: “Seeing the Disabled: Visual Rhetorics of Disability in Popular Photography” by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson; “Does Language Disable People?” by Deborah Marks; “Disability, Genetics and Eugenics” by Tom Shakespeare; “Disabled in Images and Language” by Margaret Taylor

RHE 309K • Disability In Pop Culture

44140 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 104

Pop culture simultaneously works to entrench, subvert, and transform the meanings of (dis)ability to varying degrees of success. From movies like A Beautiful Mind and Mr. Holland’s Opus to documentaries like Murderball, to the rhetoric of the beauty industry, and classic literature like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, controversies abound. The rhetoric of “the supercrip” is pervasive in a variety of media including shows like Little People, Big World; Switched at Birth; “human interest” news reports; and “Just Do It”™ Nike commercials.

In this course, students will focus on analyzing the relationship between pop culture and rhetoric. Their analyses will examine public disagreements about various issues such as: How do popular (mis)representations of “the supercrip” convince us to make political decisions regarding accessibility, advocacy, education, and/or social policy? How can we evaluate arguments that not only depict (dis)abled people as “heroic” but also those that portray the converse: the “grotesque unfortunate” deserving of “pity” and “help”? How do these arguments address questions of basic human rights, needs, drives and “eugenics rhetoric”? Will children (and adults) make political decisions based on recurrent thematic representations of “disability” in pop culture, and, is that a good or bad influence? 

Beginning with a selection of readings that introduce disability theory, students will conduct research to explore a controversy of their choice on (dis)ability in pop culture.  Throughout, students will engage with their controversy, analyzing editorials, print and video advertisements, and other contemporary portrayals of “the supercrip” in pop culture to analyze rhetorical appeals.  The last unit will focus on multimodal arguments; students will create a multimodal composition that takes a position on the representations of bodies and abilities.

Assignments and Grading

- One annotated bibliography (with peer review and additional revision)

- One 4-7 page visual rhetorical analysis (with peer review and additional revision)

- One group argument project using multimedia (with presentation and revision)

- Three 1-page research summaries posted to the class wiki and short reading quizzes

Grades in this course are determined through analysis and evaluation of student work (both the products and the overall process) via the Learning Record, which accompanies a portfolio of work presented at the midterm and at the end of the course. These portfolios present a selection of student work, both formal and informal, completed during the semester, ongoing observations about student learning, and analysis of student work with respect to the student’s development across six dimensions of learning: independence, knowledge, skills, use of prior and emerging experience, reflectiveness, and originality. Students must demonstrate growth across the five course strands: presentation, argumentation, writing process, digital literacy, and research. The criteria for grades are posted at the Learning Record website: http://www.learningrecord.org/.

Required Texts

Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities (UT Custom Edition) Stancliff and Crowley

Easy Writer: A Pocket Reference Andrea A. Lunsford

Course packet with selections from disability theory/rhetoric such as: “Seeing the Disabled: Visual Rhetorics of Disability in Popular Photography” by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson; “Does Language Disable People?” by Deborah Marks; “Disability, Genetics and Eugenics” by Tom Shakespeare; “Disabled in Images and Language” by Margaret Taylor

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