Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

Stephanie Rosen


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Courses


E 314V • Gay & Lesbian Lit & Culture

34753 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM FAC 10
(also listed as WGS 301)

Instructor:  Rosen, S            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  34753            Flags:  Cultural Diversity, Writing

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F            Computer Instruction:  Yes

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: In 2010, Dan Savage began a viral video campaign when he and his partner posted a video to YouTube promising a viewing audience of gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual kids that life “gets better.” The project’s uncritical positive attitude has received critique from some queer intellectuals and kids, but it has also inspired videos from prominent LGBT people and allies, and given some viewers suffering from discrimination and heartbreak a sense of community and hope.

Before YouTube, queer people read books. In fact, reading, writing, and critiquing literary works has long been an occupation of queer-identified people. Literature can build community and offer hope, but it can also reflect the complexities of queer lives and relationships, transform transgressive pleasures into art, and analyze the histories and ideologies that often keep things from simply getting better, in spite of Savage’s promise.

In this course, we will examine the specific features of literary works that enable them to do all this, and that have long made them an important part of queer culture. Students will develop skills — close analytic reading and creative critical writing — that will help them succeed in upper-division courses across campus. This class is therefore recommended for English majors and non-majors alike. Readings include canonical and popular literatures, as well as some music, film and new media, and scholarly articles that will inform our approach.

Texts: Readings will include works by Gloria Anzaldúa, Langston Hughes, Frank O’Hara, Sappho, Shakespeare, Eve Sedgwick, Sandy Soto, Michel Foucault, Oscar Wilde. Readings will be provided in a coursepack available for purchase.

Requirements & Grading: Students will write three 2-page papers, revise two of these papers, and write one longer 5-7-page paper. Students will write regularly in an online forum.

Grades in this class will be determined using the Learning Record, a nontraditional, evidence-based system for assessing student progress and achievement.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Health

44130 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM FAC 10

Are you well? Are you healthy? The answers to these questions reveal much about your sense of self and your experience of the world. But this class argues that the answers reveal much also about the rhetoric of health in the world around you. Doctors aren't the only ones who decide what mental, physical, and sexual health mean; TV commercials, internet ads, e-mail spam, drug companies, and public officials do too (or try to) through persuasive arguments about health. In this course we will examine those arguments with the goal of learning both about rhetoric and about health in our society and history. One major premise of this class is that arguments made by medical texts throughout history have not shared a common definition of health and that the definition of health remains a site of controversy. Another major premise is that even non-medical texts often make implicit arguments about this controversial concept. Therefore we will work with texts as varied as ads for Zoloft and Viagra, news on Obama-care and H1N1, and works by Freud, Hippocrates, and Pasteur.

Major Written Assignments

Blog Post (250-500 words) – Synthesize an argument about health made in the assigned text.

Essay I (500 - 750 words) - Summarize a text from class reading and write a rhetorical analysis of the arguments it makes about health.

Blog Post (500-750 words) Write a short summary and analysis of an advertisement you found in your research that makes an argument about health.

Advertisement (group project) - Work in a group to create an FDA-approved advertisement for an imaginary drug for a venue of your choosing.

Annotated Bibliography (5 sources) – Create an annotated bibliography in proper MLA format.

Public Controversy Map (1000-1250 words) - Write a short map of the controversy you will research.

Public Health Controversy Analysis (1200-2000 words) - Write an essay in which you comment on or intervene in the public health debate.

Grading

Grades in this course will be determined by use of the Learning Record, a system which requires students to compile a portfolio of work at the midterm and at the end of the semester. These portfolios present a selection of your work, observations about your learning, and analysis of your work development in terms of the five dimensions of learning and the goals or “strands” for this course. The dimensions of learning have been developed by teachers and researchers, and they represent what learners experience in most any learning situation: (1) Confidence and independence, (2) Knowledge and understanding, (3) Skills and strategies, (4) Use of prior and emerging experience, (5) Reflectiveness. The course strands for RHE 309K are (1) Presentation: writing style and mechanical correctness, (2) Argumentation: the ability to present a convincing claim and the ability to organize information in a convincing manner, (3) Writing Process: efforts that precede composition and critical reconsideration and reshaping of a written product, (4) Digital Literacy: the ability to locate and manage streams of information in electronic environments, compose multimodal texts using digital technologies, and participate in collaborative online spaces, (5) Research: the ability to find credible sources and incorporate them into one's writing.

Required Texts

Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities by Sharon Crowley and Michael Stancliff

Easy Writer by Andrea Lunsford

“Medicine,” Lapham's Quarterly, Fall 2009.

RHE 309K • Rhetoric Of Health

43950 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM FAC 7

Are you well? Are you healthy? The answers to these questions reveal much about your sense of self and your experience of the world. But this class argues that the answers reveal much also about the rhetoric of health in the world around you. Doctors aren't the only ones who decide what mental, physical, and sexual health mean; TV commercials, internet ads, e-mail spam, drug companies, and public officials do too (or try to) through persuasive arguments about health. In this course we will examine those arguments with the goal of learning both about rhetoric and about health in our society and history. One major premise of this class is that arguments made by medical texts throughout history have not shared a common definition of health and that the definition of health remains a site of controversy. Another major premise is that even non-medical texts often make implicit arguments about this controversial concept. Therefore we will work with texts as varied as ads for Zoloft and Viagra, news on Obama-care and H1N1, and works by Freud, Hippocrates, and Pasteur.

Major Written Assignments

Blog Post (250-500 words) – Synthesize an argument about health made in the assigned text.

Essay I (500 - 750 words) - Summarize a text from class reading and write a rhetorical analysis of the arguments it makes about health.

Blog Post (500-750 words) Write a short summary and analysis of an advertisement you found in your research that makes an argument about health.

Advertisement (group project) - Work in a group to create an FDA-approved advertisement for an imaginary drug for a venue of your choosing.

Annotated Bibliography (5 sources) – Create an annotated bibliography in proper MLA format.

Public Controversy Map (1000-1250 words) - Write a short map of the controversy you will research.

Public Health Controversy Analysis (1200-2000 words) - Write an essay in which you comment on or intervene in the public health debate.

Grading

Grades in this course will be determined by use of the Learning Record, a system which requires students to compile a portfolio of work at the midterm and at the end of the semester. These portfolios present a selection of your work, observations about your learning, and analysis of your work development in terms of the five dimensions of learning and the goals or “strands” for this course. The dimensions of learning have been developed by teachers and researchers, and they represent what learners experience in most any learning situation: (1) Confidence and independence, (2) Knowledge and understanding, (3) Skills and strategies, (4) Use of prior and emerging experience, (5) Reflectiveness. The course strands for RHE 309K are (1) Presentation: writing style and mechanical correctness, (2) Argumentation: the ability to present a convincing claim and the ability to organize information in a convincing manner, (3) Writing Process: efforts that precede composition and critical reconsideration and reshaping of a written product, (4) Digital Literacy: the ability to locate and manage streams of information in electronic environments, compose multimodal texts using digital technologies, and participate in collaborative online spaces, (5) Research: the ability to find credible sources and incorporate them into one's writing.

Required Texts

Critical Situations: A Rhetoric for Writing in Communities by Sharon Crowley and Michael Stancliff

Easy Writer by Andrea Lunsford

“Medicine,” Lapham's Quarterly, Fall 2009.

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