Ethnic and Third World Literature
Ethnic and Third World Literature

YVETTE MARIE DECHAVEZ


Courses


E 314L • Banned Books And Novel Ideas

34940 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM PAR 308

E 314L  l  3-Banned Books and Novel Ideas

 

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  34940

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  One of the following: E 303C (or 603A), RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 303C (or 603A).

 

Description:  This course emphasizes the connections between the past, present, and future in Black literature and culture.  We will examine a variety of texts--including novels, movies, and musical performances--as we address topics such as gender, sexuality, anti-Blackness, and the potential for political and social change in America.

 

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines.  They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities.  Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

 

This course contains a writing flag.  The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

 

Tentative Texts:  Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; James Baldwin, Notes of a Native Son; Beyoncé, Lemonade.

 

Requirements & Grading:  There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted.  Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (80% of the final grade).  There will also be short reading quizzes at the beginning of each class (20% of the final grade).

E 377M • American Novel After 1960

35735 • Fall 2017
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 206

E 377M  l  The American Novel after 1960

 

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  35735

Semester:  Fall 2017

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

 

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description:  This course will focus on the American novel and the stories it tells about the past, present, and future.  We will focus on a diverse group of voices and investigate how these voices diverge and come together.  We will think about the role of the American novel, who we value as American novelists, and what the novel itself looks like.  The goal of this course is for students to think critically about each text and to connect with both literature and America in a new way.

 

Texts (Tentative):  Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Jennifer Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad.

 

Requirements & Grading (Subject to Change):  Class Participation, including reading quizzes--20%; 1 in-class oral presentation and annotated bibliography--25%; 2 short (1250-1500 word) analytical essays, one of which may be rewritten for credit--30% (15% each); and one take-home final essay exam--25%.

 

Attendance:  Students are allowed three unexcused absences during the semester.  Additional absences will result in a lower course grade.

AFR 317F • African American Lit And Cul

29675 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM MEZ 1.102
(also listed as E 314V)

E 314V  l  1-African American Literature and Culture

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  34135

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  AFR 317F

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.; Writing

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: This course touches on many facets of African American literature and culture. We will begin with a discussion of slavery and the Middle Passage and move toward the present, focusing on the ways in which the past continues to inform the present moment. We will examine a variety of texts, including novels, performances, and musical pieces. This course will address topics such as gender and sexuality, racism, and the potential for political and social change in America.

The primary aim of this course is to help students develop and improve the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills needed for success in upper-division courses in English and other disciplines. They will also gain practice in using the Oxford English Dictionary and other online research tools and print resources that support studies in the humanities. Students will learn basic information literacy skills and models for approaching literature with various historical, generic, and cultural contexts in mind.

This course contains a writing flag. The writing assignments in this course are arranged procedurally with a focus on invention, development through instructor and peer feedback, and revision; they will comprise a major part of the final grade.

Tentative Texts: Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; W.E.B. DuBois, selections from The Souls of Black Folk; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Michelle Alexander, selections from The New Jim Crow.

Requirements & Grading: There will be a series of 3 short essays, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Subsequent essays may also be revised and resubmitted by arrangement with the Instructor (70% of the final grade). There may also be short quizzes, reaction papers, and/or in-class presentations (30% of the final grade).

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

35240 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JES A203A
(also listed as MAS 314)

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y

Unique #:  35240

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  MAS 314

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: In this course, the promise and failures of the American Dream will guide our discussion of Mexican American literature and culture. The course will focus on the imagined spaces that literature opens up for Mexican Americans, and how these spaces are used to critique and re-imagine the American Dream in the real world. We will address topics such as immigration, gender and sexuality, popular culture, and the potential for Chicana/os to build coalitions with others to enact political and social change in America. Additionally, we will examine the ways in which the American Dream has shaped Mexican Americans’ lived experience, including the formation of both individual and national identities. This course will be built upon the foundations of Mexican and Mexican American history, showing how, from the moment of European conquest, these histories work together to create the present for Chicana/os, and push against the American Dream.

Tentative Texts: Villarreal, Jose Antonio. Pocho (1959); Anzaldua, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza; Islas, Arturo. The Rain God (1984); Casares, Oscar. Brownsville (2003); Palacio, Melinda. Ocotillo Dreams (2011).

In addition to the listed texts, you are required to purchase a course reader that contains supplemental works by authors such as Octavio Paz and Sandra Cisneros.

Requirements & Grading: (3) Critical Reading Responses, 20%; Creative Critical Response, 15%; Quizzes, 10%; 5-7-pg Critical Essay, 15%; Critical Essay Revision, 20%; In-class Writing Exercises, 10%; Participation, 10%.

E 314V • Mexican American Lit And Cul

35065 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM CAL 200
(also listed as MAS 314)

Instructor:  DeChavez, Y            Areas:  -- / A

Unique #:  35065            Flags:  Cultural Diversity; Writing

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  MAS 314            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: In this course, the promise and failures of the American Dream will guide our discussion of Mexican American literature and culture. The course will focus on the imagined spaces that literature opens up for Mexican Americans, and how these spaces are used to critique and re-imagine the American Dream in the real world. We will address topics such as immigration, gender and sexuality, popular culture, and the potential for Chicana/os to build coalitions with others to enact political and social change in America. Additionally, we will examine the ways in which the American Dream has shaped Mexican Americans’ lived experience, including the formation of both individual and national identities. This course will be built upon the foundations of Mexican and Mexican American history, showing how, from the moment of European conquest, these histories work together to create the present for Chicana/os, and push against the American Dream.

Tentative Texts: Villarreal, Jose Antonio. Pocho (1959); Anzaldua, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza; Islas, Arturo. The Rain God (1984); Casares, Oscar. Brownsville (2003); Palacio, Melinda. Ocotillo Dreams (2011).

In addition to the listed texts, you are required to purchase a course reader that contains supplemental works by authors such as Octavio Paz and Sandra Cisneros.

Requirements & Grading: (3) Critical Reading Responses, 20%; Creative Critical Response, 15%; Quizzes, 10%; 5-7-pg Critical Essay, 15%; Critical Essay Revision, 20%; In-class Writing Exercises, 10%; Participation, 10%.

RHE S306 • Rhetoric And Writing

87975 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM PAR 310

Multiple meeting times and sections. Please consult the Course Schedule for unique numbers.

This does NOT meet the Writing Flag requirement.

This composition course provides instruction in the gathering and evaluation of information and its presentation in well-organized expository prose. Students ordinarily write and revise four papers. The course includes instruction in invention, arrangement, logic, style, revision, and strategies of research.

Course centered around the First-Year Forum (FYF) selected readings. Students focus on the foundational knowledge and skills needed for college writing. In addition, they are introduced to basic rhetoric terms and learn to rhetorically analyze positions within controversies surrounding the FYF readings.

RHE 306 is required of all UT students. Contact the Measurement and Evaluation Center, 2616 Wichita (471-3032) to petition for RHE 306 credit.

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