The Economics Department

William Glade


Professor Emeritus

William Glade

Contact

Biography


Dr. William Glade began teaching at The University of Texas at Austin in 1971 and served as the director of the Institute of Latin American Studies. His research focused on comparative economics, international business, money and banking. Dr. Glade held numerous consulting positions for government agencies including the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the United States Information Agency and the Ford Foundation.

Courses


ECO 350K • Economy Of The Arts-W

33275 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WRW 113

Please check back for updates.

ECO 350K • Pol Econ Of Publ/Cul Diplomacy

33285 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 3.102
(also listed as REE 335)

Please check back for updates.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

33955 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 420
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 350K • Chronic Inequal In Lat Am Dev

34025 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 420

Please check back for updates.

ECO 355 • Dev Probs/Pols In Latin Amer

34065 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BRB 2.136

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

32230 • Spring 2006
Meets MW 8:00AM-9:30AM BRB 1.118
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 350K • Economy Of The Arts-W

32305 • Spring 2006
Meets MW 12:30PM-2:00PM BRB 1.118

Please check back for updates.

ECO 350K • Growth: Brazil, Mexico, Chile

32310 • Spring 2006
Meets MW 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 1.116

Please check back for updates.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

31775 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 420
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Probs/Pols In Latin Amer

31870 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BRB 2.136

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO S350K • Growth: Brazil/Mexico/Chile-W

83640 • Summer 2005
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM WEL 3.402

The course is designed for undergraduate students who seek an understanding of how to apply basic microeconomic tools to the study of health and medical care issues.  This course will examine the special features of medical care as a commodity, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers, the functioning of insurance markets, federal health insurance programs, and regulation.  Finally, this course will examine ideas for health care reform.  Empirical results, current issues, and policy applications will be discussed throughout the course.  

Prerequisites: ECO 420K with at least a C- or better.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

30890 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 215

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Probs/Pols In Latin Amer

31000 • Spring 2005
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM UTC 3.132

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

31510 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 420
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Probs/Pols In Latin Amer

31590 • Fall 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.102

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

29620 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM GAR 215

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Probs/Pols In Latin Amer

29715 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 3.132

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

29950 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 420
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Prob & Pol In Latin Amer

30030 • Fall 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.124

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 355 • Dev Prob & Pol In Latin Amer

29250 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.132

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

LAS 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

36600 • Spring 2003

For honors candidates in Latin American studies. Individual reading of selected works for one semester, followed in the second semester by the writing of an honors thesis.

Prerequisite: For Latin American Studies 679HA, Latin American Studies 359H, admission to the Latin American Studies Honors Program, and written consent of the Latin American Studies Honors Program adviser; for 679HB, Latin American Studies 679HA.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

29575 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM WAG 420
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Prob & Pol In Latin Amer

29655 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.110

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

29230 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM UTC 3.132
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Prob & Pol In Latin Amer

29310 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.132

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

30055 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 420
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Prob & Pol In Latin Amer

30122 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.122

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 379H • Honors Tutorial Course II-W

30160 • Fall 2001

SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL READING, RESEARCH, AND WRITING OF A SUBSTANTIAL PAPER ON A SPECIAL TOPIC IN THE FIELD OF ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 378H.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

29520 • Spring 2001
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BRB 1.118

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

30000 • Fall 2000
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 420
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

28985 • Spring 2000
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BRB 1.120

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

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