The Economics Department

Brian M Trinque


LecturerPh.D., University of Texas

Brian M Trinque

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-8557
  • Office: BRB 2.102B
  • Office Hours: T/Th 2-5pm; or by appt.
  • Campus Mail Code: C3100

Courses


ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

34010 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM UTC 3.132

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34030 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM WEL 2.256

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34045 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM MEZ 2.124

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO F327 • Comparative Economic Systems

81595 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM BRB 1.118

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

81700 • Summer 2016
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM CLA 1.106

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33320 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM WAG 214

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33335 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM SAC 5.102

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

33345 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GAR 2.112

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33320 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.132

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33330 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 370

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

33335 • Fall 2015
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CLA 1.104

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO F327 • Comparative Economic Systems

82250 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM BRB 1.118

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

82360 • Summer 2015
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GDC 5.302

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33520 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 3.122

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

33525 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.130

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33530 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM SAC 5.102

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

33540 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM JGB 2.216

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

34475 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.132

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34495 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 370

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34510 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 1.118

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO F322 • Money And Banking

82927 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BRB 1.118

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

83040 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM CLA 1.104

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

34740 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.130

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34760 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM CLA 0.128

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34770 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM CLA 1.104

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34535 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM WAG 420

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34550 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM CBA 4.328

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO F327 • Comparative Economic Systems

83270 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM BRB 1.118

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

83380 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM CBA 4.328

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34325 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM BRB 2.136

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34345 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BRB 2.136

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34230 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BRB 2.136

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34245 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM BRB 2.136

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO F327 • Comparative Economic Systems

83390 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM ETC 2.102

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

83500 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM CBA 4.328

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

This course builds on the material presented in Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECO 304L).  Major theoretical concepts, analysis tools, and empirical regularities are explored in the context of issues facing the United States' economy.  By the end of the course, students should be able to address three sets of questions.  (1) What determines the performance of an economy (e.g., its growth rate, its unemployment rate)?  (2) What are the likely consequences of various government policies (regarding the supply of money, budget deficits, etc.)?  (3) What are macroeconomists saying about current issues (e.g., globalization, weakening of the U.S. dollar)?

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

34230 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.122

This course builds on the material presented in Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECO 304L).  Major theoretical concepts, analysis tools, and empirical regularities are explored in the context of issues facing the United States' economy.  By the end of the course, students should be able to address three sets of questions.  (1) What determines the performance of an economy (e.g., its growth rate, its unemployment rate)?  (2) What are the likely consequences of various government policies (regarding the supply of money, budget deficits, etc.)?  (3) What are macroeconomists saying about current issues (e.g., globalization, weakening of the U.S. dollar)?

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34250 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BRB 2.136

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on financial systems, national and global.  The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on financial systems – that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts.  Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of financial systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills.  Topics addressed during class meetings (apart from practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper) will emphasize financial innovation.  During the last third of the semester, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34258 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BRB 2.136

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34145 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM WAG 201

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34156 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BRB 2.136

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO F327 • Comparative Economic Systems

83325 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GEA 114

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

83450 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WAG 420

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

34431 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM BRB 2.136

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

33428 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM BRB 2.136

Theories of and practices in the principal types of economic systems.

Prerequisite: Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

ECO F327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

82820 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 2.112

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

82950 • Summer 2010
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM PAR 1

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

This course builds on the material presented in Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECO 304L) and 420K. Major theoretical concepts, analysis tools, and empirical regularities are explored in the context of seven case studies. The first case study presents stylized facts of long-run economic growth in the United States. The second case demonstrates how changes in the links between technology and economic behavior might account for alternating episodes of rapid then slow economic growth. Case three examines the role of financial markets, emphasizing that the long run is created as people respond to short-run circumstances. Case four introduces the basics of the business cycle by addressing the phenomenon of so-called "jobless growth." The fifth case continues the examination of how the business cycle might be substantially altered in the New Economy. In the final two cases, expectations and resulting dynamic interactions are highlighted in the treatment of international flows of goods and financial assets, the labor market, and economic growth. If more information is needed contact instructor.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33615 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM WAG 214

“The purpose of economics is not to acquire a set of readymade answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists." Joan Robinson, 1955

 

ECO 322 Money and Banking-W

 

Spring 2010                                      (33615) MWF 3 to 3:50                                WAG 214

 

Instructor: Brian M. Trinque                                                                                   BRB 3.102B

 

trinque@austin.utexas.edu (475-8557)               MTWTh, 10 to 11:30, or by appointment

 

Course description

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on financial systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on financial systems – that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts.  Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of financial systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills.

Topics addressed during class meetings (apart from practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper) will emphasize financial innovation. During the last third of the semester, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

 

Prerequisites: To remain in this course, you must have both

(1) completed ECO 420K and

(2) completed ECO 320L.

If you lack either of these prerequisites, you will be dropped from this course; you are advised to adjust your schedule now (since no economics courses may be added after the fourth class meeting).

 

Materials

Required readings and reference materials will be placed on electronic reserves

(ereserves course page).

Details, including password, will be provided in class.

 

Assignments and Grading

Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) a scholarly debate or issue of relevance to financial systems. Grades are based on the quality of the written product.

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-329-3986 (video phone).

You are expected to begin working immediately on the first two assignments. All assignments must be submitted by the specified due dates (see table on the next page). All materials are to be turned in during regular class meetings. If you miss class on a due date, bring/send the items due before the class meets, if possible. If that is not possible, contact me within 24 hours of the class meeting. A late penalty may be imposed. If contact is not made within 24 hours, I reserve the right to refuse the submission, resulting in zero credit for that portion of the course grade. Detailed guidelines and procedures are provided in the Writing Guidelines. Failure to comply with any of the stated procedures may result in a grade penalty.

You will write an in-class essay most Wednesdays, beginning on 27 January and ending on 10 March. These essays will encourage and assess your understanding of lectures and related readings, and enable feedback on the effectiveness of your writing. Each essay will be scored between zero and four points; the average of essay scores will determine 20% of your course grade.

Attendance is expected. Moreover, each student will serve as a discussant for two classmates’ papers; attendance on the dates scheduled for the presentations of those papers is mandatory.

The in-class presentation is optional, but strongly recommended. The presentation deepens your understanding of your chosen research topic and contributes to your classmates’ knowledge. My intention is that everyone who does the presentation will receive an “A” for that 10% portion of the course grade. If you choose to not do the presentation, the weight on the final draft of the term paper is raised from 25% to 35%.

Graded assignments will be returned in class. Thereafter, such documents will be in my office for you to collect at your convenience (and are stored for approximately four years).  Retrieving the graded documents is the only way to know your grade. I do not post grades nor discuss grades via phone or email. Final course grades become available on line when and as the Registrar posts them.

Conversion of score to letter grade will occur as follows:

 

95 to 100 A

90 to 94 A-

87 to 89 B+

83 to 86 B

80 to 82 B-

75 to 79 C+

65 to 74 C

60 to 64 C-

50 to 59 D

0 to 49 F

 

ASSIGNMENT

DUE DATE

PORTION OF COURSE GRADE

 

PRACTICE REPORT

(based on assigned article;

minimum 5 pages)

 

19 February

10%

 

PROPOSAL STATEMENT

(based on "your" article)

 

19 February

10%

 

PRELIMINARY DRAFT

(minimum 10 pages)

 

12 March

10%

 

DISCUSSANT COMMENTS

7 May

15%

 

IN-CLASS PRESENTATION

(optional)

 

per individual sign-up

10%

 

FINAL DRAFT

(minimum 15 pages)

 

7 May

25%

 

IN-CLASS ESSAYS

Weds., 27 Jan. through 10

March

 

20%

 

THERE ARE NO EXAMS

 

 

 

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

33625 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122

“The purpose of economics is not to acquire a set of readymade answers to economic questions,

but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists." Joan Robinson, 1955

ECO 327 Comparative Economic Systems-W

spring 2010 (33625) MWF 1 – 1:50 p.m. UTC 3.122

Brian M. Trinque, Ph.D. Office hours: MTWTh, 10 to 11:30, or by appointment

trinque@austin.utexas.edu BRB 3.102B (475-8557)

Course description

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national

and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the

scholarly literature on economic systems – that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts.

Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills.

Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and

expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion.

This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies in unique, though interrelated, ways.

This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of

economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan’s economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present.

During the first two-thirds of the session, lectures will address economic transition as

well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper.

Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-inprogress.

Comparative Economic Systems-W (spring 2010) 2

Materials & Communication

There is no required text. Required readings and additional reference materials will be

placed at electronic reserves,

http://reserves.lib.utexas.edu/eres/courseindex.aspx?page=search

Details, including password, will be provided in class.

If you have a learning, sensory, or psychiatric disability, please let me know early in the

semester so your learning needs can be appropriately met.

I am committed to being available when you are, whether during the day, evening or on

weekends; please do not hesitate to schedule an appointment.

Graded assignments and exams will be returned in class. Thereafter, such documents

will be in my office for you to collect at your convenience (and are stored for approximately four years). Retrieving the graded documents is the only way to know your grade. I do not post grades nor discuss grades via phone or email. Final course grades become available on line when and as the Registrar posts them.

Assignments and Grading

Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing,

understanding, and communicating (in writing) a scholarly debate or issue of relevance to economic systems. Grades are based on the quality of the written product.

You are expected to begin working immediately on the first two assignments. All

assignments must be submitted by the specified due dates (see table on page 4). All materials are to be turned in during regular class meetings. If you miss class on a due date, bring/send the items due before the class meets, if possible. If that is not possible, contact me within 24 hours of the class meeting. A late penalty may be imposed. If contact is not made within 24 hours, I reserve the right to refuse the submission, resulting in zero credit for the corresponding portion of the course grade. Detailed guidelines and procedures are provided in the Writing Guidelines.

Failure to comply with any of the stated procedures may result in a grade penalty.

You will write an in-class essay each Wednesday, 27 January through 10 March. These

essays will encourage and assess your understanding of lectures and related readings, and enable feedback on the effectiveness of your writing. Each essay will be scored between zero and four points; the average of essay scores will determine 20% of your course grade.

Comparative Economic Systems-W (spring 2010) 3

Attendance is expected. Moreover, each student will serve as a discussant for two

classmates’ papers; attendance on the dates scheduled for the presentations of those papers

is mandatory.

The in-class presentation is optional, but strongly recommended. The presentation

deepens your understanding of your chosen research topic and contributes to your classmates’ knowledge. My intention is that everyone who does the presentation will receive an “A” for that 10% portion of the course grade. If you choose to not do the presentation, the weight on the final draft of the term paper is raised from 25% to 35%.

Conversion of score to letter grade will occur as follows:

Expected Learning Outcomes

Successful completion of this course will enable you to

a) identify several types of economic systems humans have devised.

b) describe how the British became the first to establish capitalism.

c) explain how and why capitalism in the United States differs from the capitalism

of Japan.

d) discuss the requirements and challenges of transition to capitalism in present-day

societies.

e) discuss the ethical basis of capitalism and compare it to the values underlying

other economic systems.

f) explain interactions among a society’s material environment, belief systems,

social hierarchy, and economic performance.

g) access, understand, and communicate (in writing) a scholarly debate or issue of

relevance to economic systems.

95 to 100 A

90 to 94 A-

87 to 89 B+

83 to 86 B

80 to 82 B-

75 to 79 C+

65 to 74 C

60 to 64 C-

50 to 59 D

0 to 49 F

 

Comparative Economic Systems-W (spring 2010)

ASSIGNMENT

DUE DATE

PORTION OF COURSE GRADE

 

PRACTICE REPORT

(based on Temin article;

minimum 5 pages)

 

12 February

10%

 

PROPOSAL STATEMENT

 (based on "your" article)

 

 

12 February

10%

 

PRELIMINARY DRAFT

(minimum 10 pages)

 

12 March

10%

 

DISCUSSANT COMMENTS

7 May

15%

 

IN-CLASS PRESENTATION

(optional)

 

per individual sign-up

10%

 

FINAL DRAFT

(minimum 15 pages)

 

7 May

25%

 

IN-CLASS ESSAYS

Weds., 27 Jan. through 10

March

 

20%

 

THERE ARE NO EXAMS

 

 

 

ECO 322 • Money And Banking-W

33785 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 2.112

“The purpose of economics is not to acquire a set of readymade answers to economic questions,

but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists." Joan Robinson, 1955

ECO 322 Money and Banking-W

fall 2009 (33785) MWF 12:00 to 12:50 GAR 2.112

Instructor: Brian M. Trinque BRB 3.102B

trinque@eco.utexas.edu (475-8557) MTW, 9 to 11:30, or by appointment

Course description

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on financial systems, national

and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the

scholarly literature on financial systems – that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts.

Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of financial systems,

exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing

skills.

Topics addressed during class meetings (apart from practical tips on accessing the

literature and composing a coherent term paper) will emphasize financial innovation. During the

last third of the semester, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their

work-in-progress.

Prerequisites: To remain in this course, you must have both

(1) completed ECO 420K and

(2) completed ECO 320L.

If you lack either of these prerequisites,

you will be dropped from this course;

you are advised to adjust your schedule now

(since no economics courses may be added after the fourth class meeting).

Materials

Required readings and reference materials will be placed on electronic reserves

(

ereserves course page).

Money and Banking-W (fall 2009) 2

Assignments and Grading

Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing,

understanding, and communicating (in writing) a scholarly debate or issue of relevance to

financial systems. Effort itself will be rewarded with my respect and sympathy; grades are based

on the quality of the written product.

Any student with a documented disability who requires academic accommodations

should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (512) 471-6259 (voice) or 1-866-

329-3986 (video phone).

You are expected to begin working immediately on the first two assignments. All

assignments must be submitted by the specified due dates (see table on the next page). All

materials are to be turned in during regular class meetings. If you miss class on a due date,

bring/send the items due before the class meets, if possible. If that is not possible, contact me

within 24 hours of the class meeting. A late penalty may be imposed. If contact is not made

within 24 hours, I reserve the right to refuse the submission, resulting in zero credit for that

portion of the course grade. Detailed guidelines and procedures are provided in the Writing

Guidelines. Failure to comply with any of the stated procedures may result in a grade penalty.

You will write an in-class essay most Wednesdays, beginning on 2 September and ending

on 4 November. These essays will encourage and assess your understanding of lectures and

related readings, and enable feedback on the effectiveness of your writing. Each essay will be

scored between zero and four points, the lowest two scores will be dropped, and the remaining

scores will determine 20% of your course grade.

Attendance is expected. Moreover,

classmates’ papers; attendance on the dates scheduled for the presentations of those papers

is mandatory.

each student will serve as a discussant for two

The in-class presentation is optional, but strongly recommended. The presentation

deepens your understanding of your chosen research topic and contributes to your classmates’

knowledge. My intention is that everyone who does the presentation will receive an “A” for that

10% portion of the course grade. If you choose to not do the presentation, the weight on the final

draft of the term paper is raised from 20% to 30%.

Money and Banking-W (fall 2009) 3

Conversion of score to letter grade will occur as follows:

Graded assignments will be returned in class. Thereafter, such

documents will be in my office for you to collect at your convenience

(and are stored for approximately four years). Retrieving the graded

documents is the only way to know your grade. I do not post grades

nor discuss grades via phone or email. Final course grades become

available on line when and as the Registrar posts them.

ASSIGNMENT DUE DATE PORTION OF COURSE GRADE

PRACTICE REPORT

(minimum 5 pages)

11 September 10%

PROPOSAL STATEMENT

9 September 10%

PRELIMINARY DRAFT

(minimum 10 pages)

9 October 10%

DISCUSSANT

4 December 20%

IN

-CLASS PRESENTATION

(optional)

per individual sign-up 10%

FINAL DRAFT

(minimum 15 pages)

4 December 20%

IN

-CLASS ESSAYS Weds., 2 Sept. thru 4 Nov. 20%

THERE ARE NO EXAMS

95 to 100 A

90 to 94 A-

87 to 89 B+

83 to 86 B

80 to 82 B-

75 to 79 C+

65 to 74 C

60 to 64 C-

50 to 59 D

0 to 49 F

ECO 355 • Dev Probs/Pols In Lat Amer-W

33875 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM UTC 3.102

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO F327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

82635 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 0.128

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

82750 • Summer 2009
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM GAR 0.128

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 304L • Introduction To Macroeconomics

33005 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 3.132

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33110 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM UTC 3.122

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

33120 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking-W

33985 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM UTC 3.132

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 355 • Dev Probs/Pols In Lat Amer-W

34080 • Fall 2008
Meets MWF 3:00PM-4:00PM UTC 3.102

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO F327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

84015 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 10:00AM-11:30AM GAR 1.126

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

CONTAINS A SUBSTANTIAL WRITING COMPONENT AND FULFILLS PART OF THE BASIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENT IN WRITING.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

84150 • Summer 2008
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM GAR 0.128

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33845 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM BRB 1.118

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

33855 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.132

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Devel Probs/Pols In Lat Amer-W

33942 • Spring 2008
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM UTC 3.132

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems

34410 • Fall 2007
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BRB 1.120
(also listed as REE 335)

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 355 • Dev Probs/Pols In Latin Amer

34500 • Fall 2007
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM BRB 2.136

DESCRIPTION OF THE LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMY; BUSINESS AND MARKET ORGANIZATION; PROBLEM OF GROWTH (INVOLVING CREDIT, PUBLIC FINANCE, TRADE, INVESTMENT ASPECTS).

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

SAME AS LAS 355 (TOPIC 1) , URB 351 (TOPIC 1).

Course description Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC), more than any other region, has been and continues to be a laboratory for economic theories, ideologies, and strategies. This has been a mixed blessing, at best, for residents of the region. However, those who seek to understand the determinants of economic performance and development find here an abundance of raw material. LAC economies are today part legacy and part dynamic reshaping of intellectual and political influences (some indigenous, others imported). In this course, current circumstances in the economies of Latin America & the Caribbean prompt us to ask how such things arise and where they might lead. The principal objective of the graded assignments in this course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on LAC economies - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of the region's economies, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Your grade in this course will depend principally on your success in accessing, understanding, and communicating (in writing) scholarly debates or issues of relevance to the economies of LAC.

ECO F322 • Money And Banking-W

84025 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM UTC 3.132

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

84155 • Summer 2007
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM UTC 3.124

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33045 • Spring 2007
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM WCH 1.120

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

33200 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.122

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 327 • Comparative Economic Systems-W

33210 • Spring 2007
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.132

THEORIES OF AND PRACTICES IN THE PRINCIPAL TYPES OF ECONOMIC SYSTEMS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is a writing workshop and seminar focusing on economic systems, national and global. The principal objective of the course is to enable your engagement with the scholarly literature on economic systems - that is, to learn how to learn from relevant experts. Secondary course objectives include deepening your understanding of economic systems, exercising your talents in information retrieval and processing, and sharpening your writing skills. Economic transition is an important phenomenon of the 21st century. In a large and expanding number of countries, a transition process is underway or, at least, under discussion. This transition is away from economic systems based on personal authority and inter-personal loyalties toward an economic system based on self-interested and self-reliant competitive struggle under a de-personalized rule of law. Such transitions are altering the global economy and affecting specific societies as diverse as Mexico, Germany, Uganda, Russia, India, and Japan. This course sets aside the contentious debates over the feasibility and desirability of economic transition, attempting instead to understand transition as an historical process. The focus of the course is on two instances of such transition. What caused Great Britain to become the pioneer of transition? What explains the peculiar characteristics of Japan's economic system? In our approach to these specific cases, we examine selected aspects of the evolution of economic systems from ancient times to the present. During the first two-thirds of the semester, lectures will address economic transition as well as practical tips on accessing the literature and composing a coherent term paper. Thereafter, most class meetings will consist of presentations by students of their work-in-progress.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33780 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM UTC 3.122

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

33805 • Fall 2006
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM UTC 3.122

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking-W

33947 • Fall 2006
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM BRB 1.120

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO F320L • Macroeconomic Theory

83950 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM GAR 313

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

84105 • Summer 2006
Meets MTWTHF 11:30AM-1:00PM UTC 3.132

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

32120-32125 • Spring 2006
Meets MW 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.124

A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

32210 • Spring 2006
Meets M 3:30PM-6:30PM BRB 1.120

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking-W

32220 • Spring 2006
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.132

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

31560 • Fall 2005
Meets TTH 8:00AM-9:30AM JES A121A

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

31755 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 101

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

31760 • Fall 2005
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM PAR 1

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO F322 • Money And Banking

83490 • Summer 2005
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM UTC 1.146

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

30645 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.132

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 304K • Introduction To Microeconomics

30655 • Spring 2005
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM WAG 214

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 420K • Microeconomic Theory

30770-30775 • Spring 2005
Meets MW 2:00PM-3:30PM WAG 214

A SURVEY OF NEOCLASSICAL AND CONTEMPORARY THEORIES OF THE PRINCIPAL DETERMINANTS OF PRICES AND OF THE ROLE OF PRICES IN ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K AND 304L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH, AND MATHEMATICS 408C AND 408D, OR MATHEMATICS 408K AND 408L, WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

The primary objective of the course is to study contemporary theories of the principal determinants of prices and the role of prices in economic organization. The course will emphasize the fundamental concepts of microeconomics and provide concrete examples of their application. The course will cover the demand and supply theories for competitive markets, some instances of market power, basics of the game theory, choice under uncertainty, and equilibrium in an exchange and production economy.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

31475 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM UTC 3.102

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

31490 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM UTC 3.124

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

31495 • Fall 2004
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.124

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO F322 • Money And Banking-W

83390 • Summer 2004
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM UTC 1.146

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

29570 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 4.110

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

29605 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking-W

29610 • Spring 2004
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM UTC 3.122

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

29915 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM UTC 3.102

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

29935 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.124

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ECO 322 • Money And Banking

29940 • Fall 2003
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM BRB 2.136

THE ROLE OF MONEY AND DEPOSITORY INSTITUTIONS IN THE ECONOMY; INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL AND MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING MAY BE COUNTED: ECONOMICS 322, FINANCE 354, 354H.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K AND 320L WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C- IN EACH.

This course is about economic wealth: its various forms (called assets), the institutions that create, own, and exchange wealth, the government policies that regulate the behavior of these institutions, and the social origins and consequences of these assets, institutions, and policies. Financial assets-including but not limited to money-exist as stores of value, linking the production of goods in the present to the production and consumption of goods in the future. The focus of this course is on the challenge wealth presents to society: the need to ensure thta the public can assess with reasonable accuracy the various rates of return on financial assets. So long as financial assets, on average, meet people's expectations, people will seek to acquire and be willing to hold them. The resulting demand for financial assets is simultaneously a reflection of the public's confidence in them and a principal determinant of their rates of return. The origins and evolution of assets, institutions, and policies may be understood as an endless search for socially effective and privately profitable means of managing the risky task of betting on the future.

ANS 361 • Contemporary Indian Economy-W

26751 • Spring 2003
Meets TTH 12:30PM-2:00PM RLM 5.112

Selected topics in south and east Asian anthropology, economics, history, geography, government, art, music, and philosophy.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Asian Studies 320 and 361 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ECO 304L • Intro To Macroeconomics-Cxs

29020 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM UTC 1.146

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

29128 • Spring 2003
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM UTC 3.122

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 304K • Intro To Microeconomics-Cxs

29394 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM PAR 1

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 304K • Intro To Microeconomics-Cxs

29395 • Fall 2002
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 214

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

29550 • Fall 2002
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM UTC 3.124

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

83780 • Summer 2002
Meets MTWTHF 1:00PM-2:30PM GAR 1

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 304L • Intro To Macroeconomics-Cxs

29125 • Spring 2002
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM UTC 3.132

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

29210 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM UTC 1.116

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 350K • Contemporary Indian Economy-W

29285 • Spring 2002
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM RAS 218
(also listed as ANS 361)

Please check back for updates.

ECO 304K • Intro To Microeconomics-Cxs

29822 • Fall 2001
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM WAG 214

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ECO 350K • Compartv Eco South/East Asia-W

30104 • Fall 2001
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM JES A217A
(also listed as ANS 361)

Please check back for updates.

ECO 379C • Individual Conference Course

30155 • Fall 2001

SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL STUDY OF SELECTED PROBLEMS IN ECONOMICS. MAY NOT BE COUNTED TOWARD THE TWENTY-FOUR SEMESTER HOURS IN ECONOMICS REQUIRED FOR THE MAJOR IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: UPPER-DIVISION STANDING AND CONSENT OF INSTRUCTOR. STUDENTS SHOULD ORDINARILY HAVE COMPLETED SIX SEMESTER HOURS OF UPPER-DIVISION COURSEWORK IN ECONOMICS AND COURSEWORK WITH SUPERVISING INSTRUCTOR.

MAY BE COUNTED TOWARD THE INDEPENDENT INQUIRY FLAG REQUIREMENT.

HOUR(S) TO BE ARRANGED. RESTRICTED ENROLLMENT; CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT FOR PERMISSION TO REGISTER FOR THIS CLASS. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT.

ECO F320L • Macroeconomic Theory

83202 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM UTC 3.122

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO S320L • Macroeconomic Theory

83295 • Summer 2001
Meets MTWTHF 8:30AM-10:00AM WEL 2.122

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 304L • Intro To Macroeconomics-Cxs

29405 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM RAS 313A

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 

ECO 320L • Macroeconomic Theory

29465 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM UTC 3.124

THEORY OF THE DETERMINATION OF NATIONAL INCOME, EMPLOYMENT, AND THE PRICE LEVEL, WITH POLICY IMPLICATIONS. REQUIRED OF STUDENTS MAJORING IN ECONOMICS.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 420K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

The purpose of this course is to further students' understanding of the central ideas of macroeconomics.  We will study long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations.  Once we have a basic understanding of these phenomena, we will discuss the main macroeconomic tools of the government, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to critically read articles on current economic issues that appear in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

ECO 350K • Contemporary Indian Economy-W

29578 • Spring 2001
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM RLM 5.118
(also listed as ANS 361)

Please check back for updates.

ECO 304K • Intro To Microeconomics-Cxs

29840 • Fall 2000
Meets MWF 9:00AM-10:00AM WEL 3.402

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUAL CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND WORKERS; SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF MARKETS.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course provides an introduction to the theory of how consumers and business firms behave in the market economy. The topics include demand and supply in a competitive market, optimal consumption choice by the individual household given its budget constraint, the producer's costs and output decisions, the demand for labor and other inputs, and economic outcomes under product demand structures ranging from perfect competition to pure monopoly. For specific instructor syllabi and requirements, contact individual instructor.

ANS 361 • Contemporary Indian Economy-W

26860 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM RAS 213

Selected topics in south and east Asian anthropology, economics, history, geography, government, art, music, and philosophy.  Specific offerings are listed in the Course Schedule.  Asian Studies 320 and 361 may not both be counted unless the topics vary.  Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

ECO 304L • Intro To Macroeconomics-Gw

28845 • Spring 2000
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM RAS 313A

ANALYSIS OF THE ECONOMY AS A WHOLE (ITS ORGANIZATION AND THE BASIC FORCES INFLUENCING ITS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT); MONEY AND BANKING, NATIONAL INCOME, PUBLIC FINANCE, AND INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES.

PREREQUISITE: ECONOMICS 304K WITH A GRADE OF AT LEAST C-.

DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE 100 OR MORE STUDENTS.

This course is designed to introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and models of analysis of macroeconomics. We will discuss the behavior of the aggregate economy, particularly the Gross Domestic Product; Consumption; Savings; Investment,Unemployment; Inflation; the role of the Monetary System and and Policy, the role of Taxes, Government Spending and Fiscal Policy; the National Debt and Government Budget Deficits and Surpluses; Exports, Imports and International Trade.

 

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