Department of English

Larry D Carver


ProfessorPh.D., 1973, University of Rochester

Director, Liberal Arts Honors Program
Larry D Carver

Contact

Interests


Eighteenth-century British literature and rhetoric.

Biography


Larry Carver, Professor of English and holder of the Doyle Professorship in Western Civilization, is a graduate of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut and of the University of Rochester.  He has taught at UT Austin since 1973, focusing his scholarly work on Restoration and 18th-Century British poetry and drama and on the work of Feliks Topolski.   He currently serves as the Director of the Liberal Arts Honors Programs. 

Courses


LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

29825 • Fall 2016
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM WEL 2.246

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 103H • The Ideas Of Civic Engagement

29080 • Spring 2016
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM WEL 2.246

HMN 116 continues the work LAH 102H, “The Idea of the Liberal Arts.”  Like LAH 102H, HMN 116 introduces Liberal Arts Honor freshmen to the resources of the University, their history and how to make best use of them.  It also provides guidance on internships, scholarships, and career paths, and in the belief that to those to whom much has been given, much is required, it encourages LAH students to prepare for a lifetime of civic engagement and public service.  Toward this latter goal, all students will propose a way or ways to become involved in the volunteer community of Austin.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

29365 • Fall 2015
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM WEL 2.246

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 103H • The Ideas Of Civic Engagement

29465 • Spring 2015
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM WEL 2.246

HMN 116 continues the work LAH 102H, “The Idea of the Liberal Arts.”  Like LAH 102H, HMN 116 introduces Liberal Arts Honor freshmen to the resources of the University, their history and how to make best use of them.  It also provides guidance on internships, scholarships, and career paths, and in the belief that to those to whom much has been given, much is required, it encourages LAH students to prepare for a lifetime of civic engagement and public service.  Toward this latter goal, all students will propose a way or ways to become involved in the volunteer community of Austin.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

30240 • Fall 2014
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM WEL 2.246

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 103H • The Ideas Of Civic Engagement

30390 • Spring 2014
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM GAR 0.102

HMN 116 continues the work LAH 102H, “The Idea of the Liberal Arts.”  Like LAH 102H, HMN 116 introduces Liberal Arts Honor freshmen to the resources of the University, their history and how to make best use of them.  It also provides guidance on internships, scholarships, and career paths, and in the belief that to those to whom much has been given, much is required, it encourages LAH students to prepare for a lifetime of civic engagement and public service.  Toward this latter goal, all students will propose a way or ways to become involved in the volunteer community of Austin.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

30065 • Fall 2013
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM WEL 2.246

Each week this course features a lecture by a professor in one of the departments in the College of Liberal Arts.  They discuss what it means to study their disciplines, what is new in their fields, and what career opportunities might open up to those who pursue a particular major.  Students are given a chance to ask questions and meet with professors to discuss their work in depth.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

30030 • Fall 2012
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM FAC 21

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 350 • Our Lives In Fiction

30265 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 286

In this course we will explore the hypothesis that human beings have and continue to create and recreate themselves through the telling of stories.  While we tell stories for many reasons--pleasure, escapism, will to power, and so forth--one of the principal reasons, or so the course posits, is to find out what is significant, what is praiseworthy, what is it we should value and why.  As the infant Akhilleus sat on the lap of his tutor, Phoenix, "wet[ing] [his] shirt, hiccuping/wine-bubbles in distress," the greatest of ancient Greek heroes was listening to stories "instruct[ing] [him] in these matters/to be a man of eloquence and action."  Years later, Phoenix will seek once again to guide the actions of his extraordinary charge by telling him a story.  If you are like me, as a child and now an adult, you too heard and continue to hear stories; you too have sought and now continue to seek in these stories patterns of how to live.  It is this educative function of story that we will be exploring.  We will begin the course with two 20th-century coming of age novels, one about a young man, and one about a young woman. We will then turn back to read four great novels of our literary history.

Texts.

Miguel de Cervantes, Don QuixoteCharles Dickens, Great ExpectationsFyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers KaramazovGustave Flaubert, Madame BovaryMaxine Hong Kingston, The Woman WarriorJ.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye

HMN 370 • Senior Tutorial Course

39840 • Fall 2011

A tutorial program of supervised reading and writing, including an individual paper or papers in which the student draws together the central directions and discoveries of his or her studies in the humanities. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Consent of the humanities adviser.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

29995 • Fall 2011
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.306

Each week this course features a lecture by a professor in one of the departments in the College of Liberal Arts.  They discuss what it means to study their disciplines, what is new in their fields, and what career opportunities might open up to those who pursue a particular major.  Students are given a chance to ask questions and meet with professors to discuss their work in depth.

LAH 350 • Rhetoric Of Great Speeches

30055 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.210

This course has three goals:  (1) to learn about the nature and history of rhetoric; (2) to introduce ourselves, or reintroduce ourselves, to some of the great speeches of the Western tradition; and (3) in carrying out goals one and two, to learn a good deal of history.  The course opens by tracing the ancient Greek ideal that the hero must be accomplished on the battlefield as well as in the assembly, a doer of deeds but also a speaker of words.  We will read and analyze speeches from The Iliad and Odyssey as well as those from Xenophon and Thucydides, Plato, and Euripides.  Along the way, we will learn about the art of rhetoric.  Following a brief look at the place of rhetoric in the Roman Republic and early empire, we will continue our study of rhetoric by focusing on the "Gettysburg Address," an astonishing 272 words that William Safire considers "the best short speech since the Sermon on the Mount."  Having then acquired the proper tools, we will read famous, and perhaps not so famous, speeches, literary and historical, from the Renaissance forward, from Henry V's St. Crispin Day speech to those by Churchill, President Kennedy, and Barbara Jordan.

LAH 350 • Our Lives In Fiction

30312 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM SZB 286
(also listed as CTI 345)

In this course we will explore the hypothesis that human beings have and continue to create and recreate themselves through the telling of stories.  While we tell stories for many reasons--pleasure, escapism, will to power, and so forth--one of the principal reasons, or so the course posits, is to find out what is significant, what is praiseworthy, what is it we should value and why.  As the infant Akhilleus sat on the lap of his tutor, Phoenix, "wet[ing] [his] shirt, hiccuping/wine-bubbles in distress," the greatest of ancient Greek heroes was listening to stories "instruct[ing] [him] in these matters/to be a man of eloquence and action."  Years later, Phoenix will seek once again to guide the actions of his extraordinary charge by telling him a story.  If you are like me, as a child and now an adult, you too heard and continue to hear stories; you too have sought and now continue to seek in these stories patterns of how to live.  It is this educative function of story that we will be exploring.  We will begin the course with two 20th-century coming of age novels, one about a young man, and one about a young woman. We will then turn back to read four great novels of our literary history.

Texts and Works: (assigned readings from)

Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote

Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary

Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior

J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye

Requirements and Grading Policy:

Grades will be based on the following:  (1) regular class attendance, careful preparation of the readings, and active participation in the games; (2) short papers responding to the day’s reading; (3) timely submission of all work; and (4) a final examination, which will ask you to identify and tell the significance of selected passages from the semester’s reading.  Grades on writing will make up 35% of the grade; class participation will constitute 35%; and the final examination 30%.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

29330 • Fall 2010
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM PAI 3.02

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 350 • Rhetoric Of Great Speeches

29395 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM MEZ 2.210
(also listed as CTI 375)

Description:

This course has three goals:  (1) to learn about the nature and history of rhetoric; (2) to introduce ourselves, or reintroduce ourselves, to some of the great speeches of the Western tradition; and (3) in carrying out goals one and two, to learn a good deal of history.  

The course opens by tracing the ancient Greek ideal that the hero must be accomplished on the battlefield as well as in the assembly, a doer of deeds but also a speaker of words.  We will read and analyze speeches from The Iliad and Odyssey as well as those from Xenophon and Thucydides, Plato, and Euripides.  Along the way, we will learn about the art of rhetoric.  Following a brief look at the place of rhetoric in the Roman Republic and early empire, we will continue our study of rhetoric by focusing on the "Gettysburg Address," an astonishing 272 words that William Safire considers "the best short speech since the Sermon on the Mount."

Having then acquired the proper tools, we will read famous, and perhaps not so famous, speeches, literary and historical, from the Renaissance forward, from Henry V's St. Crispin Day speech to those by Churchill, President Kennedy, and Barbara Jordan.

 

Texts:

Edward P.J. Corbett, Classical Rhetoric for the Modern Student

William Safire, Lend Me Yours Ears: Great Speeches in History

Euripides, Medea (Dover edition; trans. Rex Warner)

Gary Wills, Lincoln at Gettsburg

Packet of speeches by Winston Churchill available from I.T. Copy, 214 West MLK Blvd.

 

Requirements:

 For writing assignments, we will analyze speeches but also write speeches; and we will, given the proper occasion, listen to some speeches.  As a final assignment, I am thinking of a choice between a commencement speech or a study of a body of speeches of your own choosing.


LAH 358Q • Supervised Research

29420 • Fall 2010
(also listed as HMN 358Q)

Supervised Research. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: A
University grade point average of at least 3.50 and consent of the
liberal arts honors program adviser. Only one LAH 358Q may be applied towards college honors. Course may be repeated.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

29547 • Spring 2010
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM MEZ 2.202

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

HMN 379 • Conference Course

40505 • Fall 2009

Individual instruction in a topic approved by the instructor and the humanities adviser.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the humanities adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. May be repeated for credit.

HMN 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

40510 • Fall 2009

Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

29665 • Fall 2009
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.306

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 358Q • Supervised Research

29750 • Fall 2009

Supervised Research. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: A
University grade point average of at least 3.50 and consent of the
liberal arts honors program adviser. Only one LAH 358Q may be applied towards college honors. Course may be repeated.

LAH 679TA • Honors Thesis

29755 • Fall 2009

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.

LAH 679TB • Honors Thesis-W

29760 • Fall 2009

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

29090 • Spring 2009
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM CBA 4.342

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

29825 • Fall 2008
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.306

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

29620 • Spring 2008
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM CBA 4.342

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

30170 • Fall 2007
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.306

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

29125 • Spring 2007
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM HRH 3.102A

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

29715 • Fall 2006
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.306

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

28315 • Spring 2006
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM HRH 3.102A

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

27845 • Fall 2005
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.306

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

26970 • Spring 2005
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM HRH 3.102A

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

27620 • Fall 2004
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM MEZ 1.306

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

26020 • Spring 2004
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM HRH 3.102A

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

26170 • Fall 2003
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM FAC 21

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAH 679TA • Honors Thesis

26225 • Fall 2003

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.

LAH 679TB • Honors Thesis-W

26230 • Fall 2003

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.

LAH W679TA • Honors Thesis

81936 • Summer 2003

Restricted to Plan I majors in the College of Liberal Arts. Supervised research, reading, and writing of a substantial paper on an interdepartmental subject.

Prerequisite: For Liberal Arts Honors 679TA, upper-division standing, a grade point average of at least 3.50, and written consent of the director of the Liberal Arts Honors Program; for 679TB, Liberal Arts Honors 679TA.

Offered on the letter-grade basis only.

HMN 101 • Community Service

36210 • Spring 2003
Meets T 5:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

LAH 112H • The Nature Of Inquiry

25420 • Spring 2003
Meets T 3:30PM-5:00PM GEB 4.200C

Liberal Arts Honors 112H is designed to help students in their junior year who will be writing a Senior Plan I Honors Thesis the following year.  The class format will be a workshop setting in which we will discuss pertinent topics concerning the process of writing a thesis and share our on-going work. 

LAH 102H • The Idea Of The Liberal Arts

25895 • Fall 2002
Meets M 4:00PM-5:30PM FAC 21

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. An overview of the liberal arts disciplines.

Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

HMN 101 • Community Service

36050 • Spring 2002
Meets T 5:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

HMN 101 • Community Service

35970 • Spring 2001
Meets T 5:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

HMN 379 • Conference Course

36000 • Spring 2001

Individual instruction in a topic approved by the instructor and the humanities adviser.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the humanities adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. May be repeated for credit.

HMN 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course-W

36005 • Spring 2001

Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.

HMN 101 • Community Service

36765 • Fall 2000
Meets TH 5:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

HMN 101 • Community Service

35650 • Spring 2000
Meets T 5:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

HMN 101 • Community Service

35655 • Spring 2000
Meets TH 5:00PM-6:00PM CAL 200
 
A Community Based Service Learning course in which students mentor elementary level students struggling with literacy through the SEAL student organization. This course will entail guest speakers, weekly discussion, weekly journal entries, and supplemental readings.
 

Students must be available from 2:45 to 4:45, once per week, on either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, to volunteer at their assigned school.

If you are interested, email davey.seal.literacy@gmail.com for approval and further information.

Curriculum Vitae


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