Department of English

Mary E Blockley


ProfessorPh.D., 1984, Yale University

Mary E Blockley

Contact

Interests


Old English language and literature; history of the English language; medieval manuscripts; Germanic philology.

Courses


E 323L • English As A World Language

35305 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM CAL 221
(also listed as LIN 323L)

E 323L  l  English as a World Language

Instructor:  Blockley, M

Unique #:  35305

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  LIN 323L

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  English has no equal for being the most widely used language, though this has not always been the case and will not always be so.  We will look at the steps that brought it to this position: at earlier English in competition with other languages, at what might be the core features of English and what alters or preserves them, and particularly at the role of English’s role as an intermediary of translation and as one lingua franca among others.  The focus of this course is on the description of the past and current varieties of the language, particularly grammar (and within grammar, sentence structure, inflection, and spelling), and, despite Greene’s subtitle, not on the politics of ESL or EFL use and planning.

Topics will include a review of the history of English as a second or official language; the distinctive features of English over time and space; defining characteristics of spoken and written varieties, their registers, and vocabulary; brief case studies of English from among the following environments:  The United Kingdom (including Irish English), Australia and New Zealand, West Africa (e.g. Ghana), India, English-based creoles such as Tok Pisin and Sranan, and English in China.

Texts:  David Bellos, Is That A Fish in Your Ear? (Faber and Faber, 2011, ppb 2012) • Robert Lane Greene, You Are What You Speak (Random House, 2011) • Jennifer Jenkins, Global Englishes (2014) • J Nicholas Ostler, The Last Lingua Franca: English Until the Return of Babel (Walker and Company, 2010)

Optional:  David Crystal The Stories of English (2004) • Nicholas Ostler, Empires of the Word: An Language History of the World (2006) • James Pennebaker, The Secret Life of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us (2011)

Requirements & Grading:  Grades will be awarded on a scale of 100 and converted into plus and minus letter grades at the end of the semester in accord with departmental policy:  94-100 (A), 90-93 (A-), 87-89 (B+), 84-86 (B), 80-83 (B-), 77-79 (C+), 74-76 (C), 70-73 (C-), 67-69 (D+) and so on.

Quizzes (20%):  Weekly quizzes will be given as necessary to assess your grasp of essential points and data in the assigned readings (about 120 pages a week of nonfiction) and your powers of concise, accurate expression.  One class presentation on a short selection from the readings (10%).  Three in-class closed-book exams plus a final exam (70%).

E 364P • Old English

35480 • Fall 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM CLA 0.124
(also listed as E 395N, MDV 392M)

E 364P  l  Old English

Instructor:  Blockley, M

Unique #:  35480

Semester:  Fall 2016

Cross-lists:  E 395N, MDV 392M

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites:  Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:  The earliest vernacular compositions in English, dating from the seventh century to some decades beyond the Norman Conquest in the eleventh, are our sources for Old English, a.k.a. Anglo-Saxon.  In this course we will learn how to read them with healthy skepticism and an on-line concordance.  We will begin with the prose and read extracts from travelogues, chronicles, translations from Latin, and saints' lives.  We will do some transcription from facsimiles of manuscripts to discover what editors put in and leave out in producing texts.  We will spend most of the course reading the most-studied verse compositions, including The Wanderer and possibly The Seafarer, heroic poems like The Battle of Brunanburh, The Battle of Maldon, and The Dream of the Rood, possibly some riddles and Biblical epic.  Daily translation, homework exercises, grammar quizzes as necessary, a midterm exam covering the grammar of prepared translations, and a final exam.

Texts:

 J. C. Pope and R. D. Fulk, Eight Old English Poems (Norton, 2001)

 P. S. Baker, Introduction to Old English, 3rd ed. (Wiley Blackwell, 2012) and online

 J. Clark-Hall Concise Dictionary of Anglo-Saxon (Toronto 1984)

 Dictionary of Old English online corpus.

Requirements & Grading:  Daily translation, quizzes, exercises, 55%; Midterm, 25%; Final exam, 20%.

No makeup quizzes, no more than two unexcused absences without penalty.

E 323L • English As A World Language

34520 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 2:00PM-3:00PM PAR 310
(also listed as LIN 323L)

E 323L  l  English as a World Language

Instructor:  Blockley, M

Unique #:  34520

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  LIN 323L

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: English has no equal for being the most widely used language, though this has not always been the case and will not always be so. We will look at the steps that brought it to this position: at earlier English in competition with other languages, at what might be the core features of English and what alters or preserves them, and particularly at the role of English’s role as an intermediary of translation and as one lingua franca among others. The focus of this course is on the description of the past and current varieties of the language, particularly grammar (and within grammar, sentence structure, inflection, and spelling), and, despite Greene’s subtitle, not on the politics of ESL or EFL use and planning.

Topics will include a review of the history of English as a second or official language; the distinctive features of English over time and space; defining characteristics of spoken and written varieties, their registers, and vocabulary; brief case studies of English from among the following environments: The United Kingdom (including Irish English), Australia and New Zealand, West Africa (e.g. Ghana), India, English-based creoles such as Tok Pisin and Sranan, and English in China.

Texts: David Bellos, Is That A Fish in Your Ear? (Faber and Faber, 2011, ppb 2012) • Robert Lane Greene, You Are What You Speak (Random House, 2011) • Jennifer Jenkins, Global Englishes (2014)  • J Nicholas Ostler, The Last Lingua Franca: English Until the Return of Babel (Walker and Company, 2010)

Optional: • David Crystal The Stories of English (2004) • Nicholas Ostler, Empires of the Word: An Language History of the World (2006) • James Pennebaker, The Secret Life of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us (2011)

Requirements & Grading: Grades will be awarded on a scale of 100 and converted into plus and minus letter grades at the end of the semester in accord with departmental policy: 94-100 (A), 90-93 (A-), 87-89 (B+), 84-86 (B), 80-83 (B-), 77-79 (C+), 74-76 (C), 70-73 (C-), 67-69  (D+) and so on.

Quizzes (20%) Weekly quizzes will be given as necessary to assess your grasp of essential points and data in the assigned readings (about 120 pages a week of nonfiction) and your powers of concise, accurate expression. One class presentation on a short selection from the readings (10%).Three in-class closed-book exams plus a final exam (70%).

E 364M • History Of English Language

34710 • Spring 2016
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 204
(also listed as LIN 364M)

E 364M  l  History of the English Language

Instructor:  Blockley, M

Unique #:  34710

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  LIN 364M

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will survey the long history of what certainly is the most widely spoken language in the twenty-first century. Beginning with its prehistory on the Continent over two thousand years ago, we will trace the fortunes of English from Anglo-Saxon times to its present manifestations across national boundaries. We will learn the distinctions of sounds, inflectional endings, and sentence patterns that mark each major stage of the language. Though the course will focus on the different forms of the language as they survive in various texts, we will pay some attention to the interaction between the internal history of English and the social and political contexts that define its external history. The goal is a better understanding of change in English and the signs of this change that can be seen everywhere from spelling to legal procedure. No previous study of linguistics is required; a willingness to learn phonetic transcription early in the semester, however, is crucial.

Texts: David Crystal, The Stories of English (2004); John McWhorter, Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold History of English (2008), Harcourt, One Hundred Words Almost Everyone Mispronounces (2008).

Requirements & Grading: Three in-class blue-book exams and a final exam 75%; weekly reading quizzes and occasional homework exercises 15%; class participation and attendance 10%.

There will be no make-up quizzes. Weekly reading assignments of 50-75 pages a week

E 364P • Old English

34595 • Fall 2015
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 210
(also listed as E 395N)

E 364P  l  Old English

Instructor:  Blockley, M

Unique #:  34595

Semester:  Fall 2015

Cross-lists:  E 395N, MDV 392M

Flags:  n/a

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The earliest vernacular compositions in English, dating from the seventh century to some decades beyond the Norman Conquest in the eleventh, are our sources for Old English, a.k.a. Anglo-Saxon. In this course we will learn how to read them with healthy skepticism and an on-line concordance. We will begin with the prose and read extracts from travelogues, chronicles, translations from Latin, and saints' lives. We will do some transcription from facsimiles of manuscripts to discover what editors put in and leave out in producing texts. We will spend most of the course reading the most-studied verse compositions, including The Wanderer and possibly The Seafarer, heroic poems like The Battle of Brunanburh, The Battle of Maldon, and The Dream of the Rood, possibly some riddles and Biblical epic. Daily translation, homework exercises, grammar quizzes as necessary, a midterm exam covering the grammar of prepared translations, and a final exam.

Texts: J. C. Pope and R. D. Fulk, Eight Old English Poems (Norton, 2001); P. S. Baker, Introduction to Old English, 3rd ed. (Wiley Blackwell, 2012) and online; J. Clark-Hall Concise Dictionary of Anglo-Saxon (Toronto 1984); Dictionary of Old English online corpus.

Requirements & Grading: Daily translation, quizzes, exercises, 55%; Midterm, 25%; Final exam, 20%.

No makeup quizzes, no more than two unexcused absences without penalty.

E 364M • History Of English Language

34860 • Spring 2015
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 308
(also listed as LIN 364M)

E 364M  l  History of the English Language

Instructor:  Blockley, M

Unique #:  34860

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  LIN 364M

Restrictions:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Writing

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: In this course we will survey the history of what certainly is the most widely spoken language in the twenty-first century. Beginning with its prehistory on the Continent over two thousand years ago, we will trace the fortunes of English from Anglo-Saxon times to its present manifestations across national boundaries. We will learn the distinctions of sounds, inflectional endings, and sentence patterns that mark each major stage of the language. Though the course will focus on the different forms of the language as they survive in various texts, we will pay some attention to the interaction between the internal history of English and the social and political contexts that define its external history. The goal is a better understanding of change in English and the signs of this change that can be seen everywhere from spelling to legal procedure. No previous study of linguistics is required; a willingness to learn phonetic transcription early in the semester, however, is crucial.

Texts: David Crystal, The Stories of English (2004); Harcourt, One Hundred Words Almost Everyone Mispronounces (2008).

Requirements & Grading: Two in-class blue-book exams, 35%; Quizzes, frequent homework exercises, 40%; Comprehensive final exam, 25%.

There will be no make-up quizzes.

E 396L • Beowulf

35150 • Spring 2015
Meets MW 3:00PM-4:30PM PAR 210

In this course we will  read the 3,182 line poem in the original Old English and its several hundred years of linguistic and critical tradition, moving necessarily at the pace of 220-250 lines of translation a week.  Previous semester-length study of Old English or Old Norse required.

Texts:

Fulk, Bjork and Niles, Klaeber’s Beowulf  4th edition (Toronto, 2008)

DOE online corpus (and DOE for A-F, when available)

Grading and Requirements:

Daily translation, quizzes, exercises     50%

Midterm      25%

Final exam or project     25%

No makeup quizzes.  More than two unexcused absences incurs a penalty.

http://ebeowulf.uky.edu/images/Opening-sml.jpg?1302304326?

E 323L • English As A World Language

35705 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 302
(also listed as LIN 323L)

Instructor:  Blockley, M

Unique #:  35705

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 323L

Flags:  Global Cultures; Writing

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: English has no equal for being the most widely used language, though this has not always been the case and will not always be so.  We will look at the steps that brought it to this position: at earlier English in competition with other languages, at what might be the core features of English and what alters or preserves them, and particularly at the role of English’s role as an intermediary of translation and as one lingua franca among others.   The focus of this course is on the description of the past and current varieties of the language, particularly grammar (and within grammar, sentence structure, inflection, and spelling), and, despite Greene’s subtitle, not on the politics of ESL or EFL use and planning.

Topics will include a review of the history of English as a second or official language; the distinctive features of English over time and space; defining characteristics of spoken and written varieties, their registers, and vocabulary; case studies of English from among the following environments:  England (sometimes called English English), Australia, West Africa (e.g. Ghana), India, English-based creoles such as Tok Pisin and Sranan,  Chicana/o English, Estuary English,  Irish English, and Newfoundland English.

Texts: David Bellos,  Is That A Fish in Your Ear? ( Faber and Faber, 2011, ppb 2012) • Leslie Dunton-Downer,  The English Is Coming! (Simon and Schuster, 2010) • Robert Lane Greene, You Are What You Speak (Random House, 2011) • Nicholas Ostler  The Last Lingua Franca: English Until the Return of Babel (Walker and Company, 2010) • Peter Trudgill and Jean Hannah, International English, 5rd ed (Hodder, 2008).

Optional: • David Crystal The Stories of English (2004) • Nicholas Ostler  Empires of the Word: An Language History of the World (2006) • James Pennebaker, The Secret Life of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us (2011) • Scott L Montgomery Does Science need a Global Language? (2013) • Jennifer Jenkins, World Englishes, 2nd ed.  (2009).

Requirements & Grading: Grades will be awarded on a scale of 100 and converted into plus and minus letter grades at the end of the semester in accord with departmental policy: 94-100 (A), 90-93 (A-), 87-89 (B+), 84-86 (B), 80-83 (B-), 77-79 (C+), 74-76 (C), 70-73 (C-), 67-69  (D+) and so on.

Quizzes (20%) Quizzes will be given as necessary to check progress on reading to test your grasp of essential points and data in the readings, and your powers of concise, accurate expression. Three in-class closed-book exams plus a final exam (70%).

E 364P • Old English

35905 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 9:30AM-11:00AM CAL 200
(also listed as E 395N)

Instructor:  Blockley, M

Unique #:  35905

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  E 395N, MDV 392M

Flags:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The earliest vernacular compositions in English, dating from the seventh century to some decades beyond the Norman Conquest in the eleventh, are our sources for Old English, a.k.a. Anglo-Saxon. In this course we will learn how to read them with healthy skepticism and an on-line concordance. We will begin with the prose and read extracts from travelogues, chronicles, translations from Latin, and saints' lives. We will do some transcription from facsimiles of manuscripts to discover what editors put in and leave out in producing texts. We will spend most of the course reading the most-studied verse compositions, including The Wanderer and possibly The Seafarer, heroic poems like The Battle of Brunanburh, The Battle of Maldon, and The Dream of the Rood, possibly some riddles and Biblical epic. Daily translation, homework exercises, grammar quizzes as necessary, a midterm exam covering the grammar of prepared translations, and a final exam.

Texts: J. C. Pope and R. D. Fulk, Eight Old English Poems (Norton, 2001); P. S. Baker, Introduction to Old English, 3rd ed. (Wiley Blackwell, 2012) and online; J. Clark-Hall Concise Dictionary of Anglo-Saxon (Toronto 1984); Dictionary of Old English online corpus.

Requirements & Grading: Daily translation, quizzes, exercises, 55%; Midterm, 25%; Final exam, 20%.

No makeup quizzes, no more than two unexcused absences without penalty.

E 323L • English As A World Language

35690 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 302

Instructor:  Blockley, M            Areas:  IV / G

Unique #:  35690            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: English is presently spoken by 5.4% of the world’s population. It has no equal at present for being the most widely used language, though this has not always been the case and may not always be so. We will look at the steps that brought English to this position over the last three centuries, at earlier English in competition with other languages, at what might be the core features of English and what alters or preserves them, sometimes through the English-language media outside this country. The focus in this course is on the description of the past and current varieties of the language, not on the politics of ESL use and planning.

Topics will include a brief review of the history of English as a first language since 1066; the history of English as a second or official language (including a look at English loanwords in other languages); the distinctive features of English over time and space: sounds, inflections, and grammar; the spoken and the written varieties, with some attention to register and vocabulary; and brief case studies from among the following environments: Australia, India, Tok Pisin and Sranan, West Africa, Canada, Chicano English, and Estuary English.

Texts: David Bellos, Is that A Fish In Your Ear? (2012) Leslie Dunton-Downer The English Is Coming! (2012), Robert Lane Green You Are What You Speak (2011) Nicholas Ostler The Last Lingua Franca: English Until the Return of Babel (2010) Peter Trudgill and Jean Hannah, International English, 5th ed. 2008 (Edward Arnold);

Requirements & Grading: Quizzes (15%) Quizzes will be given as necessary to check progress on reading.

Selective bibliography and sentence outline (subheadings) for an encyclopedia-style report on a variety of World English (3 pages) (10%)

Four in-class exams (60%)

Comprehensive final exam or, with arrangement by the 5th week of class, a formal paper (15%)

E 364P • Old English

35910 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM PAR 305
(also listed as E 395N)

Description:

The earliest vernacular compositions in English, dating from the seventh century to some decades beyond the Norman Conquest in the eleventh, are our sources for Old English, aka Anglo-Saxon.  In this course we will learn how to read them with healthy skepticism, an on-line concordance, and standard student grammars.  We will begin with the prose and read extracts from proverb collections, vernacular chronicles, and saints’ lives.  We will do some transcription from facsimiles of manuscripts to discover what editors put in and leave out in producing texts.  We will spend most of the course reading the most-studied verse compositions, including The Wanderer, heroic poems like The Battle of Brunanburh and The Battle of Maldon,  enigmatic first-person poems like The Dream of the Rood, The Wife’s Lament, and possibly some riddles.  There will be daily translation, homework exercises, grammar quizzes as necessary, a midterm exam covering the grammar of prepared translations, and a final exam or, with previous negotiation by October 25th, a brief but formal presentation culminating in a written project.

Texts:

J. C. Pope and R. D. Fulk, Eight Old English Poems (Norton, 2001)

P. S. Baker, Introduction to Old English, 3nd ed (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012) and online

Clark-Hall Concise Dictionary of Anglo-Saxon (for the mystery text, and for finding out more than the contextual glosses for the prose passages in Baker)

(optional) Fulk and Cain,  History of Old English Literature (2002), this and the Treharne and Pulsiano collection of 2001 offer introductions to cultural and interpretative material

DOE online corpus (and DOE for A-F, when available)

Grading and Requirements:

Daily translation, quizzes, exercises                 55%

Midterm                                                    25%

Final exam or project                                   20%

No makeup quizzes.  More than two unexcused absences incurs a penalty.

 

E 364P • Old English

35610 • Spring 2013
Meets MWF 1:00PM-2:00PM PAR 302
(also listed as E 395N)

Instructor:  Blockley, M            Areas:  IV / D

Unique #:  35610            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  E 395N, LIN 350            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: The earliest vernacular compositions in English, dating from the seventh century to some decades beyond the Norman Conquest in the eleventh, are our sources for Old English, a.k.a. Anglo-Saxon. In this course we will learn how to read them with healthy skepticism and an on-line concordance. We will begin with the prose and read extracts from travelogues, chronicles, translations from Latin, and saints' lives. We will do some transcription from facsimiles of manuscripts to discover what editors put in and leave out in producing texts. We will spend most of the course reading the most-studied verse compositions, including The Wanderer and possibly The Seafarer, heroic poems like The Battle of Brunanburh, The Battle of Maldon, and The Dream of the Rood, possibly some riddles and Biblical epic. Daily translation, homework exercises, grammar quizzes as necessary, a midterm exam covering the grammar of prepared translations, and a final exam.

Texts: J. C. Pope and R. D. Fulk, Eight Old English Poems (Norton, 2001); P. S. Baker, Introduction to Old English, 3rd ed. (Wiley Blackwell, 2012) and online; J. Clark-Hall Concise Dictionary of Anglo-Saxon (Toronto 1984); Dictionary of Old English online corpus.

Requirements & Grading: Daily translation, quizzes, exercises, 55%; Midterm, 25%; Final exam, 20%.

No makeup quizzes, no more than two unexcused absences without penalty.

E 603A • Comp And Reading In World Lit

34560 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 11:00AM-12:00PM CRD 007B

In the first semester we will read a number of texts from the European epic tradition in historical order, with a view towards understanding how these works have retained their interest and authority over the centuries, and how they provide models of literary form that persist from antiquity through the long medieval era.  Some of the texts are central to the Great Books curriculum of the twentieth century; others’ significance is no longer so obvious. We will look into both the workings of large narrative forms that lie behind the modern notion of a book chapter and the development of a forensic tool kit of rhetorical, literary, and even grammatical structures.

Texts/Readings:

Fall

Iliad, Homer (trans. Lombardo)

Aeneid, Vergil (Lombardo)

Civil War, Lucan (trans. Matthew Fox)

Njalssaga, Anon. (trans. Cook)

The Táin (Táin Bó Cúailnge), Anon. (trans. Carson)

Hacker, Pocket Style Manual, 5th ed. 2009 MLA Update Version (Bedford St. Martins)

Murfin and Roy, Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms, 3rd ed. (Bedford St. Martins)

Occasional supplementary texts

Spring

Don Quixote, Cervantes (trans. Rutherford)

Tristram Shandy, Sterne

Faust, Part I, Goethe (trans. Kaufmann)

The Master and Margarita, Bulgakov (trans. Pevar and Volokhonsky)

Doctor Faustus, Mann (trans. Wood)

Generations of Winter, Aksyonov (trans. Glad and Morris)

Assignments:

Beginning in the second week, everyone will regularly bring to class meetings a written focused response (about 300 words) to the reading selection that can catalyze discussion and provide the seed for cogent essays. Plagiarism = Failure.  Since there is no midterm or final exam, presence and participation in class are crucial; anyone missing four classes, for any reason,  will fail the course.  You will also write four short formal essays (800-1000 words) over the course of the semester that will develop your ability to present an original and persuasive contextual close reading of passages from these texts and a slightly longer formal analytical one towards the end of the semester.

Reading responses, attendance and class participation (including peer reviews, oral reports): 40%

Short Essays 10% each (4 total)

Analytical Essay 20%

About the Professor:

Mary Blockley received her Ph.D. from Yale in 1984.  Her research interests include medieval philology and historical linguistics.

 

 

E 395N • Renaissance English

35715 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM CBA 4.342

Renaissance English

Instructor: Mary Blockley

E 323L • English As A World Language

35420 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 308
(also listed as LIN 323L)

Cross-listed with LIN 323L

Description: English is presently spoken by 5.4% of the world’s population.  It has no equal at present for being the most widely used language, though this has not always been the case and may not always be so.  We will look at the steps that brought English to this position over the last three centuries, at the role earlier English has played in competition with other languages, and at what might be the core features of English and what alters or preserves them, sometimes through the English-language media outside this country.  The focus in this course is on the description of the past and current varieties of the language, not on the politics of ESL use and planning.

Topics will include a brief review of the history of English as a first language since 1066; the history of English as a second or official language (including a look at English loanwords in other languages); the distinctive features of English over time and space: sounds, inflections, and grammar; the spoken and the written varieties, with some attention to register and vocabulary; and brief case studies from among the following environments:  Australia, India, Tok Pisin and Sranan, West Africa, Canada, Chicano English, and Estuary English.

Texts:  David Crystal, English as a Global Language 2nd ed 2003 (Cambridge UP), Peter Trudgill and Jean Hannah, International English, 5th ed. 2008 (Edward Arnold,), Jenn’s Coursepack (Foster, Romaine, Penfield, Burridge and Mulder, etc.)

 

Grading Policy: Quizzes (15%) Quizzes will be given as necessary to check progress on reading. Selective bibliography and sentence outline (subheadings) for an encyclopedia-style report on a variety of World English (3 pages)(10%). Three or Four in-class exams (60%) Students elect either to take a comprehensive final exam or write a draft and final version of the report (4-page rough draft with sources; 6-8 page final version of report) (15%)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

English Major Area:  IV. Language or Writing

E 364M • History Of English Language

35705 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 2:00PM-3:30PM PAR 101
(also listed as LIN 364M)

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. No exceptions.

Course Description: In this course we will survey the history of what could be argued to be now the most popular language in the world, and certainly the most widely known. Beginning with its prehistory on the Continent over two thousand years ago, we will trace the fortunes of English from Anglo-Saxon times to its present manifestations across national boundaries. We will learn the distinctions of sounds, inflectional endings, and sentence patterns that mark each major stage of the language. Though the course will focus on the different forms of the language as they survive in various texts, we will pay some attention to the interaction between the internal history of English and the social and political contexts that define its external history. The goal is a better understanding of change in English and the signs of this change that can be seen everywhere from spelling to legal procedure. No previous study of linguistics is required; a willingness to learn phonetic transcription early in the semester, however, is crucial.

Texts: Millward and Hayes, A Biography of the English Language, 3rd edition (2011); Millward, Workbook to Accompany A Biography of the English Language (1990); Harcourt, One Hundred Words Almost Everyone Mispronounces (2008).

Grading: Two in-class blue-book exams, 35%; Quizzes, workbook exercises, 40%; Comprehensive final exam, 25%.

There will be no make-up quizzes for any reason, and no make-up final without a proven medical emergency.

E 364P • Old English

34805 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM PAR 103
(also listed as E 395N, LIN 350)

The earliest vernacular compositions in English, dating from the seventh century to some decades beyond the Norman Conquest in the eleventh, are our sources for Old English, also known as Anglo-Saxon in some places.  In this course we will learn how to read them with healthy skepticism and on-line grammars and concordances.  We will begin with the prose and read extracts from proverb collections, translations from Latin, vernacular chronicles, and saints’ lives.  We will do some transcription from facsimiles of manuscripts to discover what editors put in and leave out in producing texts.  We will spend most of the course reading the most-studied verse compositions, including The Wanderer, heroic poems like The Battle of Brunanburh and The Battle of Maldon, enigmatic first-person poems like The Dream of the Rood, The Wife’s Lament, The Seafarer (for which students can consult Ezra Pound’s battered student reader in the HRHRC) and possibly some riddles. 

Requirements

Daily translation, homework exercises, grammar quizzes as necessary, a midterm exam covering the grammar of prepared translations, and a final exam of sight and prepared translation and commentary, or, with previous negotiation by October 25th, a substantial written project.

Curriculum Vitae


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