Department of English

Paul V Sullivan


LecturerPh.D., 2005, University of Texas at Austin

Paul V Sullivan

Contact

  • Phone: 471-8776
  • Office: PAR 318
  • Office Hours: TTh 9:30-10:45a & by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: B5000

Interests


Early modern drama, rhetoric, and education

Courses


E 314L • Texts And Contexts-Hon

33870 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 11:00AM-12:30PM GDC 2.502

E 314L  l  4-Texts and Contexts-HONORS

Instructor:  Sullivan, P

Unique #:  33870

Semester:  Spring 2016

Cross-lists:  n/a

Restrictions:  English Honors; Plan I Honors

Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: One of the following: E 603A, RHE 306, 306Q, or T C 603A.

Description: Note: This description is adapted from the one written by Professor Dan Birkholz for this course for fall 2015.

This course is designed to prepare students for the English major. We will read, discuss, and write about a collection of texts in several complementary ways: we will consider the text of each work, its literary and historical contexts, and the cultural contests in which it has participated. Each student will develop a working set of questions to take to the texts she or he will encounter in other English courses and beyond.

When we consider the text of each work, we will examine stylistic and aesthetic elements (e.g., the author's use of character, setting, imagery, language patterns, and even sentence syntax) and how those elements contribute to the work's broader themes, apparent purposes, and plausible effects, intended or not.

In considering each work's relationship to its literary and historical context, we will read a number of historical documents as well as shorter literary works from the period in which the work was written. Some questions we'll ask: what kinds of historical knowledge does the work assume its reader to have? How was the work in question been shaped by—and how did it shape—historically specific events, issues, and literary trends? How does each text overlap with and alter other texts?

Finally, we will consider how each of the central works has fared since its publication—that is, how it has been valued and devalued in various cultural "contests." For whom has it been especially important? When has it been considered "great literature"? By what criteria has it been judged since its first publication? Does the work have the power even now to give pleasure, deepen understanding, improve lives?

Texts: (subject to change) Shakespeare, The Tempest; Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Baldwin, Go Tell It On The Mountain; Hansberry, Raisin in the Sun; Bechdel, Fun Home.

Packet of readings posted on the Canvas internet site for this course (Ovid, “Daedelus and Icarus”; a selection of lyric poetry, including Stevens, “Sunday Morning”; Austen, from Persuasion and Pride and Prejudice; James, from Washington Square; Fitzgerald, “The Rich Boy” and “Winter Dreams”; critical essays; historical documents. Two required film screenings.

Requirements & Grading: Assignment specifics to be distributed & discussed; percentages approximate and subject to change.

Three 5-7+ pp. papers (plus required drafts for first two; required 1-page prospectus for all three), 25% each; In-Class Performance (writing, discussion, engagement, preparation, peer feedback), 25%; Attendance (repeated absences will affect grade), Required; On-time Completion of Reading & Writing Assignments, Required.

Please Note: All assignments must be completed satisfactorily in order for you to receive any passing grade for the course.

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

34845 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 204

E 360R  l  Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English

Instructor:  Sullivan, P

Unique #:  34845

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  n/a

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  Writing

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how best to develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power." Recognizing that "[t]exts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable," this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts, tentative: • Lahiri, Jumpha. The Lowland. (Bloomsbury; 1408828111) • Oates, Joyce Carol (editor). The Oxford Book of American Short Stories (Oxford; 0199744394) • Orwell, George. 1984  (Signet; 0451524934) • Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. (Norton Critical; B0070Z76WI) • Vendler, Helen. Poems, Poets, Poetry (3rd Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 978-0312463199) • Packet of photocopies available at Jenn’s Copies (Guadalupe at 21st).

Requirements & Grading: • Ten one-page reading responses and critical responses: 20% of final grade • Three short (4-6-page) papers. The first essay must be revised: 60% of final grade • Attendance (15 points) and class presentations (5 points): 20% of final grade.

Attendance will be taken in each class meeting. Students should contact the teacher about any absence. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Writing Flag

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

36105 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 204

Instructor:  Sullivan, P

Unique #:  36105

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  n/a

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description:

Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how best to develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power." Recognizing that "[t]exts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable," this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts: • Lahiri, Jumpha. The Lowland. (Bloomsbury; 1408828111) • Oates, Joyce Carol (editor). The Oxford Book of American Short Stories (Oxford; 0199744394) • Orwell, George. 1984  (Signet; 0451524934) • Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. (Norton Critical; B0070Z76WI) • Vendler, Helen. Poems, Poets, Poetry (3rd Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 978-0312463199) • Packet of photocopies available at Jenn’s Copies (Guadalupe at 21st).

Requirements & Grading: • Ten one-page reading responses and critical responses: 20% of final grade • Three short (4-6-page) papers. The first essay must be revised: 60% of final grade • Attendance (15 points) and class presentations (5 points): 20% of final grade.

Attendance will be taken in each class meeting. Students should contact the teacher about any absence. Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Writing Flag

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback from your instructor to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you may be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work. You should therefore expect a substantial portion of your grade to come from your written work. Writing Flag classes meet the Core Communications objectives of Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork, and Personal Responsibility, established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

35575 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 5:00PM-6:30PM PAR 204

Instructor:  Sullivan, P            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35575            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls “Textual Power.” Recognizing that “[t]exts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable,” this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts:  

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. (McDougal Littel; 0395775590)

Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. (Third Edition; Bedford/St. Martin’s; 0-312-457537)

Oates, Joyce Carol (editor). The Oxford Book of American Short Stories (Oxford; 0199744394)

Shakespeare, William. Twelfth Night. (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 0-312-20219-9)

Vendler, Helen. Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology 3rd Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 978-0312463199)

Packet of photocopies available at Jenn’s Copies (Guadalupe at 21st)

Requirements & Grading:

• Ten one-page reading responses and critical responses posted on Blackboard            20% of final grade

• Three short (3-5-page) papers, the first essay must be revised and resubmitted            60% of final grade

• Attendance (15 points) and class presentations (5 points)            20% of final grade

Policies:

Honor Code: The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Academic Integrity: Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student's own work. For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php 

Documented Disability Statement: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with dis­abilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd

Religious Holy Days: By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a reli­gious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Web Site: We will use the Blackboard web site provided for this course at https://courses.utexas.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past

30035 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SZB 286

Restricted to students in the Freshman Honors Program in the College of Liberal Arts. Intensive small class lecture or seminar course addressing basic issues in various liberal arts disciplines. Lectures, readings, discussions, examinations. Humanities 305 and Liberal Arts Honors 305 may not both be counted unless the topics vary. Liberal Arts Honors 305 (Topic 1) and 305 (Topic: Reacting to the Past) may not both be counted.

May be counted toward the writing flag requirement.

Designed to accommodate 35 or fewer students. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

35375 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM BEN 1.104

Instructor:  Sullivan, P            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35375            Flags:  Writing

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  n/a            Computer Instruction:  No

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls “Textual Power.” Recognizing that “[t]exts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable,” this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts: Dubois, W.E.B. The Souls of Black Folk. (Dover; 0486280417)

Hemingway, Ernest. In Our Time. (Scribner Classics; 0-68482-276-8)

Melville, Herman. Bartleby and Benito Cereno (Dover; 0486264734)

Richter, David H. Falling Into Theory: Conflicting Views On Reading Literature. (Bedford Books; 0-312-20156-7)

Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 0-312-19766-7)

Vendler, Helen. Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology 3rd Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 978-0312463199)

Packet of photocopies available at Jenn’s Copies (Guadalupe at 21st)

Requirements & Grading:

• Ten one-page reading responses and critical responses posted on Blackboard            30% of final grade

• Three short (3-5-page) papers, the first essay must be revised and resubmitted            45% of final grade

• Attendance (15 points) and class presentations (10 points)            25% of final grade

Policies:

Honor Code: The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Academic Integrity: Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student's own work. For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php 

Documented Disability Statement: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with dis­abilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd

Religious Holy Days: By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a reli­gious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Web Site: We will use the Blackboard web site provided for this course at https://courses.utexas.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

35385 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 204

E 360R and RHE 379C (Topic: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how to best develop what Robert Scholes calls “Textual Power.” Recognizing that “[t]exts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable,” this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers. 

Texts: Finkel, Donald M. Teaching With Your Mouth Shut. (Boynton/Cook; 0-867-09469-9)

Hemingway, Ernest. In Our Time. (Scribner Classics; 0-68482-276-8)

Richter, David H. Falling Into Theory: Conflicting Views On Reading Literature. (Bedford Books; 0-312-20156-7)

Scholes, Robert. Textual Power: Literary Theory and the Teaching of English. (Yale UP; 0-300-03726-0)

Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 0-312-19766-7)

Vendler, Helen. Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology 3rd Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 978-0312463199)

Packet of Xeroxes available at Speedway Copies & Printing (in the Dobie Mall)

Requirements & Grading: Students will keep a dialectical reading journal and write three, short (2 page) papers, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Any subsequent essay may be revised and resubmitted before the next paper is due (note: all drafts must be submitted with re-writes). Grades will be based on reading journals, class discussion, and attendance (40%), and on the above requirements (papers – 60%).

Policies:

Honor Code: The core values of The University of Texas at Austin are learning, discovery, freedom, leadership, individual opportunity, and responsibility. Each member of the university is expected to uphold these values through integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, and respect toward peers and community.

Academic Integrity: Any work submitted by a student in this course for academic credit will be the student's own work. For additional information on Academic Integrity, see http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acadint.php 

Documented Disability Statement: The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with dis­abilities. For more information, contact Services for Students with Disabilities at 471-6259 (voice) or 232-2937 (video phone) or http://www.utexas.edu/diversity/ddce/ssd

Religious Holy Days: By UT Austin policy, you must notify me of your pending absence at least fourteen days prior to the date of observance of a reli­gious holy day. If you must miss a class, an examination, a work assignment, or a project in order to observe a religious holy day, I will give you an opportunity to complete the missed work within a reasonable time after the absence.

Web Site: We will use the Blackboard web site provided for this course at https://courses.utexas.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp

LAH 305 • Reacting To The Past

30000 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 10:00AM-11:00AM SZB 286

“Reacting to the Past” seeks to introduce students to major ideas and texts.  It uses role-playing to replicate the historical context in which these ideas acquired significance.  During this semester, students will play three games:  “The Threshold of Democracy:  Athens in 403 B.C.”; “Shakespeare and Marlowe, 1592”; and “Rousseau, Burke, and the Revolution in France, 1791.”  Students will be assigned different roles-e.g. Thrasybulus, a radical Democrat, Oligarch, Supporter of Socrates, Rich Athlete--derived from the historical setting, each role being defined largely by its game objective-exonerate Socrates, banish Socrates, condemn him to death.  Students will determine on their own, however, how best to attain their goals, though they will receive guidance from important texts in the history of ideas, for example The Republic and the speeches of Pericles in “The Threshold of Democracy” game.  For the first few sessions of each game, we will provide guidance on the issues and historical context on which the game will turn.  Early in the third session of each game, the class will break into factions, as students with similar roles join forces to accomplish their objectives.  By the fourth or fifth session, the class will again meet as one.  Students in their roles will run the class.  We will serve as the Game Masters, intruding to resolve technical issues concerning the operation of the game or in other rare circumstances.  The heart of each game is persuasion.  For nearly every role to which you will be assigned, you must persuade others that your views make more sense than those of your opponents.  Your views will be informed by the texts cited in your game objectives, and the more you draw upon these texts and the more cleverly you draw upon them, the better.  You have two ways of expressing your views: orally and in writing.  Both will be graded.

 

Texts:

Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France (Oxford); Carnes, The Threshold of Democracy Athens in 403 B.C. and Rousseau, Burke and Revolution in France, 1791; Shakespeare, Taming of the Shrew; Marlowe, Doctor Faustus; McDonald, The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare; JACT, The World of Athens; Hacker, Rules for Writers (Bedford/St. Martin's); Plato, The Republic (Penguin); Rousseau, The Social Contract and The First and Second Discourses (Yale)

 

Requirements:

Your grade will be based on the following:  (1) regular class attendance, careful preparation of the readings, and active participation in the games; 40% (2) approximately six writing assignments- speeches, newspaper articles, poems, or whatever written expression that enables you to persuade your fellow students - totaling about thirty pages; 60%.  Timely submission of all work is essential.  

 

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays

35395 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 208

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Course Description: On completing this course a student should have detailed knowledge of eleven of Shakespeare’s plays, ten we study together and one the student chooses for independent reading and a class presentation. Together we will consider A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV Part 1, Twelfth Night, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, King Lear, and The Tempest. Our reading will inform critical writing and conversation about the plays, with a dual emphasis on close analysis of text and the dynamics of drama. As a final project, each student will read and write about one play we have not studied together in the course.

We will take some time to practice using secondary resources that help make sense of Shakespeare’s language in these and other plays and poems.

Students will attend one performance of Shakespeare, and will also study two or more filmed performances.

Texts: The Norton Shakespeare: The Essential Plays and Sonnets, edited by Stephen Greenblatt and others. Selections from seminal essays in Shakespeare criticism.

Grading: Attendance and active participation in discussion: 10%; short written responses to readings 20%; essay in close reading (5-7 pages) 20%; essay in performance criticism (6 pages) 20%; final paper and presentation (10 pages) 30%.

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Teacher Of Eng

34755 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 8:00AM-9:00AM PAR 204

Cross-listed with RHE 379C

Course Description: Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how best to develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power." Recognizing that "[t]exts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable," this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts: Finkel, Donald M. Teaching With Your Mouth Shut. (Boynton/Cook; 0-867-09469-9); Hemingway, Ernest. In Our Time. (Scribner Classics; 0-68482-276-8); Richter, David H. Falling Into Theory: Conflicting Views On Reading Literature. (Bedford Books; 0-312-20156-7); Scholes, Robert. Textual Power: Literary Theory and the Teaching of English. (Yale UP; 0-300-03726-0); Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 0-312-19766-7); Tillyard, E. M. W. The Elizabethan World Picture (Vintage; 0394701623); Vendler, Helen. Poems . Poets . Poetry : An Introduction and Anthology, 2nd Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 0-312-25706-6); Packet of Xeroxes available at Speedway Copies & Printing (in the Dobie Mall).

Grading: Students will keep a dialectical reading journal and write three, short (2 page) papers, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Any subsequent essay may be revised and resubmitted before the next paper is due (note: all drafts must be submitted with re-writes). Grades will be based on reading journals, class discussion, and attendance (40%), and on the above requirements (papers – 60%).

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

E 360R • Lit Std For H S Tchrs Of Eng-W

34910 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 3:30PM-5:00PM PAR 302
(also listed as RHE 379C)

E 360R / RHE 379C: Literary Studies for High School Teachers of English  /  Spring 2010

Unique numbers: 34910 / 45150
Instructor: Paul Sullivan  /  Office: Parlin 318  /  Office hours: MW 2-3:30 p.m.  or by appointment
sullivan@mail.utexas.edu  /  471-8776                                            


This Course Contains a Substantial Writing Component

Note: The course description, readings, and writing requirements are adopted directly from the course as taught by Professor Brian Bremen. The readings in the Xerox packet and the schedule for papers will vary somewhat from Professor Bremen’s course.

Description:

Designed for students planning a career teaching English, this course will introduce students to scholarship in literary studies that informs the teaching of literature today. Although it is not a methods course, E 360R will have a practical orientation: we will discuss the reasons for teaching literature, both historically and currently; we will examine some of the contemporary constraints on the teaching of English; and we will pursue how best to develop what Robert Scholes calls "Textual Power." Recognizing that "[t]exts are places where power and weakness become visible and discussable, where learning and ignorance manifest themselves, where structures that enable and constrain our thoughts and actions become palpable," this course will explore how the use of the study of literature can help students become better readers, writers, and thinkers.

Required Texts:

  • Finkel, Donald M. Teaching With Your Mouth Shut. (Boynton/Cook; 0-867-09469-9)
  • Hemingway, Ernest. In Our Time. (Scribner Classics; 0-68482-276-8)
  • Richter, David H. Falling Into Theory: Conflicting Views On Reading Literature.  (Bedford Books; 0-312-20156-7)
  • Scholes, Robert. Textual Power: Literary Theory and the Teaching of English. (Yale UP; 0-300-03726-0)
  • Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 0-312-19766-7)
  • Vendler, Helen. Poems . Poets . Poetry : An Introduction and Anthology 2nd Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s; 0-312-25706-6)
  • Packet of Xeroxes available at Jenn’s Copies at 2200 Guadalupe Street

Requirements:

Students will keep a dialectical reading journal and write three, short (2 page) papers, the first of which must be revised and resubmitted. Any subsequent essay may be revised and resubmitted before the next paper is due (note: all drafts must be submitted with re-writes). Grades will be based on reading journals, class discussion, and attendance (40%), and on writing assignments papers (60%).

Attendance will be taken. Students should contact the teacher about any absence.

Syllabus of Topics and Assignments

Note on due dates: Reading and the related journal writing (at least the right side) must be completed before coming to class on the date for which the reading assignment appears in the syllabus.

Notes on three class formats listed in the syllabus:

  • Faculty Meetings: students will play assigned roles, making presentations on various pedagogical and theoretical approaches. Reading and journal writing must be done before the scheduled meeting.
  • Workshops: students will play assigned roles as above, but using materials to be read in class.
  • Teaching: students will teach the class as if it were a high school English class.

Unit 1            Education by Poetry

Tuesday 19 January:  Introductions  

Thursday 21 January: 

   Workshop: first writing assignments:

  1. TEKS Results:  due next Tuesday, January 26th
  2. High School Teacher Questionnaire:  due Thursday, February 4

   Faculty Meeting: Role-playing discussion of the reading journal method and its relation to the two-page papers.
   Gary Lindberg: “The Journal Conference” (Photocopy) and all instructions on the reading journal and the two-page paper.

Tuesday 26 January

   Faculty Meeting (using your reading journal): TEKS Requirements  
         
Thursday 28 January

   Teaching: summary and due emphasis
   Vladimir Nabokov      “Good Readers and Good Writers” (Photocopy)
   Robert Frost              “Education by Poetry,” “After Apple Picking” (Photocopy)

Tuesday 2 February
    
   Teaching: summary and due emphasis
   Robert Mackey       Reading an editorial: “A Boom in the Financial Metaphor Market” (Photocopy)
   Samuel Taylor Coleridge       from The Stateman’s Manual (Photocopy)
   John Bunyan                       from Pilgrim’s Progress (Photocopy)

Unit 2            Letting the Text Talk

Thursday 4 February   

   Teaching: shrewd reading
   Nathaniel Hawthorne             “Preface” from The House of the Seven Gables,
                                              “My Kinsman, Major Molineux” (Photocopy)
   High School Teacher Questionnaire Results: Discussion
   Schedule Initial Journal Conferences (February 10th - 12th)
 
Tuesday 9 February
    
   Faculty Meeting:  Mary McCarthy    “Settling the Colonel’s Hash”    
   Workshop: Format for Discussion Board on David Richter, ed. Falling Into Theory: “Why We Read”

Talking Long Distance: Discussion Board on Richter 11 February to 16 February

Thursday 11 February

   Faculty Meeting: Theoretical Approaches  

Tuesday 16 February
    
   Faculty Meeting: the Finkel model
   Donald Finkel        Teaching With Your Mouth Shut (pp. 1 – 50)

Thursday 18 February

   Teaching: Spencer Holst        “The Zebra Storyteller”

Unit 3            Textual Power

Tuesday 23 February
   1st Paper due in class (Group A)
   Workshop: NCTE Guideline: Beliefs About the Teaching of Writing

Thursday 25 February
   1st Paper due in class (Group B
   Faculty Meeting: Robert Scholes            Textual Power (pp. 1-73)

Tuesday 2 March
   Workshop: Revising
   Donald Murray           “The Maker's Eye" and "Interview Your Draft”
   Beth Newman            "Responding to Students' Work" (Photocopy)

Thursday 4 March
   Conceptual Workshop on “fun” with Hemingway
   Ernest Hemingway       In Our Time  

Tuesday 9 March
   Rewrite of 1st Paper due in class (Group A)
   Workshop:  Responding to writing (and giving grades)

Thursday 11 March: Rewrite of 1st Paper due in class (Group B)
   Mary McCarthy          “Settling the Colonel’s Hash” (Photocopy)
   Donald Finkel            Teaching With Your Mouth Shut (pp. 86-110; 148-72)

SPRING BREAK

Unit 4             How We Read

Tuesday 23 March:
   John Kilgore             “Why Teachers Can’t read Poetry” (Photocopy)
   Laurence Perrine       “The Nature of Proof . . .” (Photocopy)
   Helen Vendler           Poems . Poets . Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology
                                                 pp. xli-xlv; 3-14; 27-61 (Sonnet 29, p. 64)

Thursday 25 March:

   Schedule Second Journal Conferences (Optional: March 29th - April 1st)           
   Vendler                pp. 73-95 (Sonnet 130, p. 97); (“Ars Poetica,” p. 522;                        
                                   Sonnet 18, p. 581)
                              pp. 107-34 (Sonnet 129, p. 137; “Mending Wall,” p. 144)

Tuesday 30 March:

   Vendler                pp. 151-65; 177-94 (“My Last Duchess,” p. 168)
                              pp. 283-92; 311-28 (“On Being Brought,” p. 300)

Thursday 1 April:

   David Richter, ed.            Falling Into Theory: “How We Read”

Talking Long Distance:  Discussion Board on Richter (April 1st - April 6th)

Tuesday 6 April: Second Paper due in class today.
   Workshop: Teaching Discussion
   Wilbert J. McKeachie          “Facilitating Discussion” (Photocopy in Appendix)
   C. Roland Christensen        “Premises and Practices of Discussion Teaching”

Thursday 8 April:
   Francine Prose                   “I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read”

Unit 5             What We Read – Who We Are

Tuesday 13 April:

   David Richter, ed.      Falling Into Theory: “What We Read”

Talking Long Distance:  Discussion Board on Richter (April 15th – April 20th)

Thursday 15 April:

   Ralph W. Emerson   “Fate” (Photocopy)

Tuesday 20 April:

   W. E. B. DuBois       The Souls of Black Folk

Thursday 22 April:
           
   Langston Hughes     “The Negro Artist & the Racial Mountain,”
                                  Selected Poems (Photocopy)
   Countee Cullen         “Yet Do I Marvel” (Photocopy)
   Joe Wood                 “Who Says a White Band Can’t Play Rap?” (Photocopy)
   Toni Morrison            “Unspeakable Things Unspoken” (Photocopy)

Unit 6             Putting It All Together

Tuesday 27 April: Third Paper due in class ( both groups)

   Workshop:  Performance
Thursday 29 April:

   William Shakespeare                        The Tempest
   Gerald Graff and James Phelan          “A Case Study in Critical Controversy”    
   Schedule Final Journal Conferences (May 3rd to May 5th)

Tuesday 4 May:

   Performance Workshop (continued)

Thursday 6 May:

   Summations. Course Instructor Surveys.

General Grading Guide:

A

  • Students working at this level engage fully every assignment and demonstrate a willingness to examine their own thinking and assumptions. All work reflects a level of thinking far beyond the obvious and the superficial. Students come to class fully prepared to discuss assigned readings and to participate actively in all phases of the course. All assignments are submitted on time and all make-up work from authorized absences is managed in a timely fashion. Obviously, all work is the student's own.
  • Students' essays contain few, if any errors in sentence structure and coherence, and they develop fully an interesting, insightful, tightly focused argument. They provide the reader with clear support and argumentation that fully justifies the author’s conclusions, and they are written in a style that is both felicitous and sophisticated. Their arguments are both complex and fully developed.
  • Reading journals indicate not only the questions and problems a student has while working with a text, but also an honest attempt at logical answers and solutions. In addition, the journals provide a full and rich argument on the student's reading of the text and go well beyond the minimum requirements of the course. Finally, the conference about the journals is consistently focused on the reading skills emphasized in class.
  • All conferences are led by the student and are focused on the reading or writing skills identified in class.

B

  • Students working at this level competently engage every assignment and consistently attempt to examine their own thinking and assumptions. The majority of the student's work reflects a level of thinking beyond the obvious and the superficial. Students come to class fully prepared to discuss assigned readings and to participate actively in all phases of the course. Most assignments are submitted on time and most make-up work from authorized absences is managed in a timely fashion. Obviously, all work is the student's own.
  • Students' essays contain few, if any, errors in sentence structure, and they develop a clear, coherent argument. Support and explanation of that argument, however, are insufficient either to convince the reader completely or to make clear how the author reaches his or her conclusions. The essays’ arguments may also be somewhat general and/or incompletely developed.
  • Reading journals indicate not only the questions and problems a student has while working with a text, but also some attempt at logical answers and solutions. In addition, the journals provide an adequate argument on the student's reading of the text and go beyond the minimum requirements of the course. Finally, the conference about the journals is somewhat focused on the reading skills emphasized in class.
  • All conferences are primarily led by the student and are focused on the reading or writing skills identified in class.

C

  • Students working at this level do not yet engage every assignment and inconsistently demonstrate a willingness to examine their own thinking and assumptions. Only a minor portion of the student's work reflects a level of thinking beyond the obvious and the superficial. Students come to class minimally prepared to discuss assigned readings and to participate actively in all phases of the course. A majority of assignments are submitted on time and most make-up work from authorized absences is managed in a timely fashion. All work is the student's own.
  • Students' essays are fundamentally sound at the level of sentence structure and diction, but their arguments rely too heavily on assertion. Specific support is either unclear or missing, and the focus of the essay may stray from its stated argument to make a more general and unrelated point. There may also be problems in coherence, complexity, or in the overall development of arguments.
  • Reading journals often indicate the questions and problems a student has while working with a text, but make only minor attempts at logical answers and solutions. In addition, the journals provide only an opinion of the text, not a supported argument on the student's reading, and they don’t go beyond the minimum requirements of the course. Finally, the conference about the journals is not fully focused on the reading skills emphasized in class.
  • All conferences are led by the student with some help, but lack consistent focus.

D

  • Students working at this level seldom engage any assignment and consistently demonstrate an unwillingness to examine their own thinking and assumptions. The student's work reflects a level of thinking that is obvious and superficial. Students come to class ill-prepared to discuss assigned readings and to participate actively in the course. Some assignments are submitted late; some assignments are missing completely. Make-up work from authorized absences is missing or seriously late. Obviously, all work is the student's own.
  • Students' essays contain problems at the level of sentence structure and diction. They are marred by repeated mechanical errors and/or awkward constructions that obscure the essay’s meaning. Argumentation here relies almost completely on assertion, with no clear support or development, and gives little or no analysis. Paragraphs contain weak or no coherence and/or focus.
  • Reading journals might indicate the questions and problems a student has while working with a text, but seldom attempt logical answers and solutions. They often deal with only a portion of the text or address the entire text on only a surface level (perhaps offering a plot summary or personal connections to a story line or character). In addition, the journal provides only broad judgmental statements on the text, not a supported argument on the student's reading of the text, and they are less than the minimum requirements of the course. Finally, the conference about the journals is unfocused and ignores required discussion of particular reading skills.
  • Required conferences are sometimes ignored by the student or the student is not prepared to discuss the reading or writing skills identified in class.

F

  • This level of work is obviously unacceptable. Work is often not submitted, or the student may completely ignore the requirements of the assignment, or the student is in violation of The University of Texas at Austin academic integrity policy.

Scholastic dishonesty:

Turning in work that is not your own, or any other form of scholastic dishonesty, will result in a major course penalty, including possible failure of the course. A report of the incident will be made to the Office of the Dean of Students. Do not use editing services other than those offered by the Undergraduate Writing Center (FAC 211) or the Learning Skills Center, where approved tutors are trained to help you resolve your own problems so that all your writing reflects what you have learned.

Research and citation:

You are not expected to use any additional sources or research for your papers, but if you do, you must provide me with photocopies or printouts of all sources you use. If you have any questions about the use you are making of sources for your assignments, see me before you turn in the paper.

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

E 321 • Shakespeare: Selected Plays-W

34985 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 12:00PM-1:00PM GAR 0.132

 

E 321: Shakespeare: Selected Plays (34985)

MWF 12-1 pm, GAR 0.132 
Instructor: Paul Sullivan  /  Office: PAR 318 MW 1:30-3:30 p.m.
English Major Requirement: Area I - Single or Dual Author; Substantial Writing Component: Yes
Prerequisite: 9 semester hours of English or RHE credit  /  Final Exam: none.


Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

Course Description

On completing this course a student should have detailed knowledge of eight of Shakespeare's plays, seven we study together and one the student chooses for independent reading and a class presentation. Together we will consider A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry the Fourth Part 1, Twelfth Night, Othello, King Lear, and The Tempest. Our reading will inform critical writing and conversation about the plays, with a dual emphasis on close analysis of text and the dynamics of drama.

We will take some time to practice using secondary resources that help make sense of Shakespeare’s language in these and other plays and poems.

Students will attend one performance of Shakespeare, and will also study two or more filmed performances.

Grading Policy

Attendance and active participation in discussion; commonplace book entries: 10%
Quizzes and a test on reading 20%
Essay in close reading (5-7 pages) 20%
Essay in performance criticism (6 pages) 20%
Final paper and presentation (10 pages) 30%

Texts

  • The Norton Shakespeare: The Essential Plays and Sonnets, edited by Stephen Greenblatt and others.
  • Selections from seminal essays in Shakespeare criticism.
  • Recommended: Russ McDonald, The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare Studies, 2nd Edition.

Reading Quizzes and Memorization

A portion (20%) of your grade will be based on the following reading quizzes, for which you will earn two points each.

M August 31:  Quiz on MND I-III.
W September 2: Quiz on MND I-V.
M September 14: Quiz on MV I-V.
W September 23: Quiz on King Lear I-II.  
M September 28: Quiz on King Lear I-V
F October 16: Quiz on HIV.1.
W October 21: Quiz on Twelfth Night I-V.
W October 28: Quiz on Othello I-V.
W November 4: Quiz on The Tempest I-V.
M November 9: Independent reading test due  

Each quiz will have several quotations from the assigned reading. You will have five minutes to identify, in brief but precise terms, the speaker and situation of a specified number of the quotations: for quizzes over two or three acts of a play, two out of three quotations; for quizzes over all five acts, three out of five quotations.

Memorizing option: you may always substitute one quotation (at least two full lines of text) that you write on the quiz from memory, along with a brief identification of speaker and situation.

The independent reading test will comprise four quotations of your choice (one-half point each) from your first reading of the play you choose for your seminar report, with brief explanations of the speaker’s situation and the effect of the words on a reader or theater audience.

Class Meetings, Topics, Due Dates

Week 1: Introductions
W August 26:  Information. Questionnaire. Reading a scene.
F August 28:  Reading and staging a scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Assign commonplace and memory option for quiz.

Week 2: Close Reading for Staging and for Writing. A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
M August 31:  Quiz on MND I-III. Close reading. Notes: verse forms in drama.
W September 2: Quiz on MND I-V. Close reading. Notes: language, lexicons. Gleek. Assign commonplace/meditation.
F September 4: Meditation on commonplace: 1 page, key scene/words. Notes: critical approaches. Assign: Find a crux in MV.

Week 3: (following Labor Day / M September 7) Close Reading in Merchant of Venice.
W September 9: Workshop: critical cruxes in Merchant of Venice. Assign: word play reports.
F September 11: Reports: word play, with examples from MND and MV. Assign Paper #1, groups.

Week 4:  First Papers Due. Staging scenes from Merchant of Venice.
M September 14: Quiz on MV I-V. Notes: writing from close reading.
W September 16: Close Reading Paper due, Group 1. Workshop: Staging MV.
F September 18: Close Reading Paper due, Group 2. Workshop: Staging MV.

Week 5: Merchant / Lear / Performance Criticism
M September 21: Close Reading Paper due, Group 3. Notes: gender and sexuality in MV.
W September 23: Quiz on King Lear I-II.  Notes: genre and tragedy.
F September 25: Bring a crux from King Lear II-IV. Linking close reading and performance.

Week 6: King Lear in Performance.
M September 28: Quiz on King Lear I-V. Perform scenes.
W September 30: Notes and workshop: performance criticism. Assign Paper #2 (Performance Criticism), groups. Tonight: performance of King Lear.
F October 2: Performance criticism of King Lear.

Week 7: Filmed Scenes from Three Tragedies for Performance Criticism: Old Plays, New Audiences
M October 5:  King Lear and the Cordelia problem
W October 7:  Romeo and Juliet and that balcony scene     
F October 9:  Hamlet and that soliloquy.

Week 8: Henry IV, Part 1:  History and Historicism
M October 12: Notes: history and HIV.1. Performance Criticism Paper due, Group 1.
W October 14: Workshop: editing/cutting for performance. Performance Criticism Paper due, Group 2.
F October 16: Quiz on HIV.1. Assign Seminar Papers. Stage scene.

Week 9: Twelfth Night and Festive Comedy. Performance Criticism Paper due, Group 3.
Writing Conferences
M October 19: Notes: festive comedy. Staging a scene.
W October 21: Quiz on Twelfth Night I-V. Staging a scene.
F October 23: Notes from a critical reading on Twelfth Night.

Week 10: Othello, Race, and Ethical Criticism. Writing Conferences
M October 26: Notes: race and ethical criticism. Reading a scene for staging.    
W October 28: Quiz on Othello I-V. Reading a speech for staging.
F October 30: Ethical criticism in Othello.

Week 11: The Tempest  
M November 2: Bring three cruxes from The Tempest, Acts I and II: verbal, dramatic, ethical/historical.
W November 4: Quiz on The Tempest I-V.
F November 6: Assign independent reading test.

Week 12: Seminar Papers on Other Plays
M November 9: Reading test due (except for today’s presenters, who may submit test on Friday).
    Taylor Gilliam
    Alex Pham
W November 11: Christopher Giles, Rebecca Reilly, Emily Lane
F November 13: Lauren Ratliff, Chelsea Mikulencak, Caroline Krause

Week 13: Seminar Papers on Other Plays
M November 16: Russell Lang, Emma Wingfield, Jeannette Saucillo
W November 18: Maddie Crum, Travis Arnold, Ben Smith
F November 20:  Amanda Smoot, Megan Reed, Lisa Alley

Week 14: Seminar Papers on Other Plays / Thanksgiving
M November 23: Sean Kennedy, Luis Perales, Nathan Seitzman
W November 25:
THANKSGIVING BREAK

Week 15: Seminar Papers on Other Plays
M November 30: Aditi Rao, Alex Gonzalez
W December 2: Daryn Ofczarsak, Kayla Johnson
F December 4: Course Evaluation

For more information, please download the full syllabus.

Publications


Sullivan, P. (2008, March) Playing the Lord: Tudor Vulgaria and the Rehearsal of Ambition. ELH, 75(1).

download

Sullivan, P. (1997, September) Murdering Macbeth: The Education of a Shakespeare Schoolteacher. Shakespeare Magazine, 1(4).

Curriculum Vitae


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